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BIOMATERIALS

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Bioinspired and biointegrated materials as new frontiers nanomaterials VII

The Symposia series I – VI on Bioinspired and Biointegrated Materials as New Frontier Nanomaterials has been running from 2009 to 2016, with a total of 1317 Presenters, featuring inspiring presentations on rapidly-developing bio-nanotechnologies for next generation nanomaterials, nanosystems and robotic nanodevices.

The VII edition of the Symposium, to be held on May 22-26 2017 in Strasburg (France), is aimed to give an overview of recent development on fundamentals and innovative applications of bio-nanotechnologies, with a special focus on biomaterials engineering and frontier nanomaterials based on emerging concepts for preparing, characterizing and applying bioinspired and biomimetic materials.

Scope:

The Symposium, boosting an interdisciplinary vision, welcomes researchers active in materials science, chemistry, physics, biotechnology and  nanomedicine. Submissions reporting on interdisciplinary research efforts, especially those exploring new and emerging concepts, as well as more-developed ideas that are breaking down barriers in biomedical research, are encouraged.

The Symposium will also be the opportunity to bring together researchers from several associated international projects including the COST Actions (MP 1301 NEWGEN & CA 15107 MultiComp) and EU HORIZON 2020 FET Open Programs (LiNaBioFluid), HORIZON 2025 started Programs

Topics to be covered by the symposium:

  • Cells, intracellular membranes & tissues bioscience, engineering and 3D/4D imaging
  • Smart scaffolds for cell seeding and soft & bone tissue bioengineering
  • Chemical and biological synthesis of biomimetic molecules and supramolecular aggregates,
  • Stimuli responsive systems, including motors, rotors, switches, pumps, receptors, light emitters, energy harvesting devices at nanoscale 
  • New nanomaterials for smart bioresponsive interfaces with biological signaling
  • Bioinspired synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles for nanomedicine
  • Carbon multifunctional 2D & 3D architectures, structure-development of  graphene, graphene oxide, nanocarbons
  • Biosensing  & biological signaling by interfaces engineering
  • Electronics and photonics based on biomolecules, supramolecular assemblies, biopolymers, including nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, etc…

The participation of young investigators is strongly encouraged, to provide the most effective and exciting environment for the discussion of the latest, cutting edge results.

The E-MRS Hq and Symposium K support Young Investigators through the E-MRS Graduate Students Awards Prizes and a special support from the Symposium K’s budget fund (cf. bottom of page for more details).          

Projects for Focused Sessions from May 22 to May 26, 2017:  

I. Cell and Tissue Nature Science, Growth at Surface/Interface, Inspired Repair & 3D/4D Imaging.

The Special Session & Young Investigator Forum are  dedicated to the 2016 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi “for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy”.  

Keynote Presentations:                

  • Tomas Webster Northeastern University, USA                                                                           
  • Osamu Suzuki, Tohoku University, Japan;
  • Paula E. Colavita, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland;
  • Yoshikatsu Akiyama, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Japan                                             
  • Masaru Tanaka , Kyushu & Yamagata Universities;                                                                            
  • Karsten Haupt, Compiegne University of Technology, France                                                          
  • Grazia Maria Lucia Messina, University of Catania;
  • Insung S. Choi, KAIST, Korea;                                                                               
  • Bert Muller, University of Basel, Switzerland;  
  • Julian R. Jones, Imperial College, London, UK

Keynote Presentations of Investigators

The COST ACTION MP 1301 NEWGEN on “Frontier Materials for bone engineering”

Paul Wolff, TUM, Germany; Lenka Novotna, CEITEC, Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Ana Mariado Espirito Santo, Federal University of Sao Paolo (UMFESP), Brazil     

The H2020 Project “LiNaBioFluid” on “ Advanced Surface Laser Engineering for Biomimetics”

Emmanuel Stratakis, IESL,FORTH & University of Crete, Greece; Johannes Heitz, Johannes Kepler University  Linz, .Austria; Sabrina Kirner, and Joern Bonze, BAM, Berlin, Germany; Jan Siegel ,Institute de Optica, CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Philipp Commanns, RWTH, Aachen University, Institute for Biology II, Aachen,Germany (Co-ordinator of the project - Emmanuel Stratakis). 

II. Smart Stimuli Responsive Nanomaterials: from designed synthesized to biological & biomimetics.

The Special Session & Young Investigator Forum are dedicated to the 2016 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry Professors Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart,  Bernard L. Feringa “for the design and synthesis of molecular machines”.                                                                       

Keynote Lecture Jean-Pierre Sauvage, University of Strasbourg, France

Keynote Presentations   

  • Yury Gogotsi, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, & A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, Drexel University, United States           
  • Hicham Fenniri, Northeastern  University, USA                                                                                    
  • Carolyn A.Koh, Dep. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, USA                                                                               
  • Arzum Erdem, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey

Invited Presentation:  Raghvendra Bohara, ,D.Y. Patil University Kolhapur, India       

Biosignaling Responsive Biomimetic Soft Nanomaterials & Interfaces. Bioelectronics                                                      

(Presenters from China Invited by Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University)   

Light Responsive Biological & Biomimetic Nanomaterials. Biophotonics & Biophotoenergy Sources                                                       

(Presenters from European Countries &  Israel Invited by Emanuela Gatto, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy)..                                                    

III. New Frontiers in Nanocarbons: 2D Materials, 3D Architecture Structures, Polycrystalline Graphene & Bio (synthesized, printed, immobilized ,integrated) Nanocarbons Multifunctionality

Keynote Presentations                                                                                                                            

  • Paolo Samori, University of Strasbourg, France; 
  • Dirk M. Guldi, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg, Germany
  • Richard B. Jackman, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College, London, UK;
  • Laura Ballerine, SISSA/ISAS & University of Trieste, Italy: Ching-Wei Lin, Rice University, USA; 
  • Aron W. Cummings, Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona, Spain 
  • Christian Muller, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden;                                          
  • Stephen J. Picken, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands;                                        
  • Nikos Tsierkezos, TU Ilmenau, Germany.                                             

Keynote Presentations of Investigators                                                                                                                                                     

The COST Action CA 15107 MultiComp, The Working Group WG 3”Chracterization, Health and Safety” The Nano-Carbon Materials Research Lab Silvia Giordani, The Italian Institute of Technology, IIT, Genova, Italy

(Invited Presenters by Silvia Giordani, IIT, Italy)                                                                        

IV. Frontier Nanomaterials: Inorganic, Organic & Bio (synthesized, immobilized, integrated) Nanoparticles

Keynote Session

Invited Presentations                                                                                                                    

Helder A. Santos, University of Helsinki, Jarno Salonan, University of Turku, & Veiko Linko, Aalto University, Finland  & Nanasaheb D. Thorat, University of Limerick, Ireland; Kenneth A. Dawson, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Thomas Werzer, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Keynote Lecture.

Reshef Tenne, Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Sciences, Rehovot, Israel;

V. Nanomaterials , Nanodevices & Bioimaging for Nanomedicine

Collaborative Session Keynote Presenters from Taiwan, Japan & Switzerland

Invited by Peilin Chen ( Academia Sinica, Taiwan): Yeukuang Hwu, Jack Hu, Chiung Wen Kuo, Peilin Chen Academia Sinica, Taiwan; Dar – Bin Hsieh, National Cheng Kung University & Yu-Sheng Hsiao, Min Chi University; Shyng-Chyang Luo, National Taiwan University; Si-Han Wu & Yi Ping Chen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan;                                   

Koichi Kato, Hiroshima University; Hideaki Yamamoto, Tohoku University, Shigeori Takenaka, Kyushu Institute Technology, Japan & Jau-Ye Shiu, ETH Zurich, Switzerland.

We look forward to seeing you at the E-MRS Spring Meeting 2017 in Strasbourg.                                               


Documentation

young_investigator_forum_may_22-23.pdf

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I. Cell &Tissue Nature Science, Growth at Surface/Interface, Inspired Repair & 3D/4D Imaging. The Special Session & Young Investigator Forum are dedicated to the 2016 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine : Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi “for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy”. Keynote Presentations Session. Chairs: Dr.D.Iandolo &Professors G.Marletta,T.Webster, Yoshikatsu Akiyama & Insung S.Choi
09:00
Authors : Donata Iandolo
Affiliations : Department of Bioelectronics, Ecole Natioal Superieure des mines, CMP-EMSE, Gardanne, France www.mines-stetienne.fr

Resume : This special session dedicated to The 2016 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi “for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy”. The discoveries have determined principal responses on the question “What is it, Autophagy? The responses we will demonstrate due to Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi Nobel Lecturers www.nobelprize.org. We look forward to working with you at this session what aimed to discuss frontiers investigations which Invited Keynote Presenters report on Cell & Tissue growth at surface/interface, inspired repair, ageing and 3D/4D imaging for ones.

K.I.1
09:10
Authors : Professor Thomas J. Webster
Affiliations : Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115

Resume : This presentation will focus on the unprecedented impact nanotechnology has had across all of medicine, specifically focusing on improved disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Disease systems will cover cancer, infection, inflammation, and poor tissue growth including bone, vascular, cardiovascular, bladder, nervous system and others. A particular focus will be placed on sensors that personalize medicine towards one's immune system. Toxicity will also be covered. A new field, picomedicine, will also be introduced concerning how further advances in medicine can be made. Here, the focus will be placed on controlling electron distributions (as opposed to atomic distribution in nanotechnology) to improve disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

K.I.2
09:40
Authors : Prof. Osamu Suzuki, Dr. Takahisa Anada, Yukari Shiwaku
Affiliations : Division of Craniofacial Function Engineering, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Japan

Resume : Bone mineralization is a process that non-stoichiometric Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) is precipitated within collagenous matrix proteins [1]. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) have been suggested to be precursor phases to bone apatite crystals [2]. Degree of supersaturation (DS) is a factor to determine which phase is precipitated on preexisting (seeded) calcium phosphate or spontaneously without any substrate calcium phosphate materials [3]. We have previously found that, if granules of ACP and OCP are mixed, the hydrolysis of OCP is enhanced by accelerating HA nano-particles deposition onto OCP crystals in simulated body fluid (SBF), and that the mixture enhances osteoconductivity more than that of single OCP if implanted in rat cranial bone defect [4]. When Ca-deficient HA, obtained from OCP hydrolysis in an experimental solution, is compared with OCP regarding immune responses, OCP stimulates macrophage-like cells accumulation more than Ca-deficient HA around the crystals in vivo condition, resulting in enhancing osteoclastogenesis, which leads to the augmentation of the biodegradable property of OCP [5]. OCP does not dissolve simply but tends to slightly become saturated with respect to OCP in physiological conditions [6,7] as well as biodegradable ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) behaves [7], suggesting that the biodegradation of OCP is induced associated with the cellular phagocytic activity in vivo [7]. The difference of osteoblast activity in OCP, HA and ?-TCP can be manifested by evaluating 3D cell culture system utilizing an osteoblastic spheroid-calcium phosphate materials construct in vitro [8]. Phosphate species in OCP surface could be detected spectroscopically associated with the chemical composition during its hydrolysis to HA [4,9]. The mechanism that OCP induces the osteoconductivity will be discussed in relation to the dissolution and the crystallization of calcium phosphate crystals. References: [1] Kim HM et al. J Bone Miner Res 10:1589 (1995); [2] Myer JL and Eanes ED. Calcif Tissue Res 25:209 (1978); [3] Wang L and Nancollas GH. Chem Rev 108:4628 (2008); [4] Kobayashi K et al. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 6:22602 (2014); [5] Hirayama B et al. RSC Adv 6:57475 (2016); [6] Suzuki O et al. J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 77:201 (2006); [7] Sakai S et al. Dent Mater J 35:216 (2016); [8] Anada T et al. Regen Therapy 3:58 (2016); [9] Suzuki O et al. J Dent Res 74:1764 (1995).

K.I.3
10:00
Authors : Prof. Yoshikatsu AKIYAMA, Jun KOBAYASHI, Masayuki YAMATO, Tatsuya SHIMIZU and Teruo OKANO
Affiliations : Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women?s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Resume : Cell-sheet based tissue engineering has been clinically applied for treatment of damaged human tissues such as corneal epithelium, esophagus tissue, sever cardiac disease and periodontal ligament and so on.[1] Such damaged human tissues were well recovered by transplantation of various cell-sheets to damaged human tissues. Those tissues were relatively simple structure in contrast to liver and heart, because of having less physiological function and no blood vessel structures. Our second target is fabrication of liver and heat tissues, which has more complicated physiological function, structure and thicker tissues, by using cell-sheet based tissue-engineering technology. We have tried to develop a new temperature-responsive cell culture surface, which was modified with growth factor, to fabricate hepatic cell sheet.[2] Hepatic cells were well adhered to the growth factor immobilized surface. By lowering temperature, adhered hepatic cells were readily harvested as a contagious cell sheet (hepatic cell sheet). The hepatic cells sheet maintained hepatocyte specific physiological function for longer period. To maintain viability of thick tissue layer such as cardiac muscle tissue, vascular formation was necessary in the thick tissue. [3] To introduce vascular formation into cardiac cell sheets, we have developed special bioreactor. In this presentation, characteristic of the growth factor immobilized temperature-responsive cell culture surface as well as fabricated hepatic cell sheet will be shown. In addition, method for vascular formation in the cardiac cell sheets will also be discussed. REFERENCES. [1] Tang Z., Akiyama Y., Okano T., Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics., 2014, 52, 917-926. [2] Arisaka Y., Kobayashi J., Ohashi K., Tatsumi K., Kim K., Akiyama Y., Yamato M., Okano T., Regenerative Therapy, 2016, 3, 97-106. [3] Sakaguchi K., Shimizu T., Horaguchi S., Sekine H., Yamato M., Umezu M., Okano T., Scientific Reports, 2013, 1316.

K.I.4
10:20 Coffee Break. General Photo    
 
The H 2020 Project “LiNaBioFluid” on “ Advanced Surface Laser Engineering for Biomimetics” : Coordinator of the project Dr. Em. Stratakis. Keynote Presentations of Co-Investigators
10:40
Authors : Emmanuel Stratakis
Affiliations : Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Heraklion, 71003, Greece; email: stratak@iesl.forth.gr 2 Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, 71003, Greece

Resume : Our recent progress on the laser-assisted biomimetic processing of materials will be reviewed. The first part of the talk will be devoted to the presentation of the objective and the public summary of the LiNaBioFluid Project (www. laserbiofluid.eu). LiNaBioFluid is a Research and Innovation Action funded by the European Community's Horizon 2020 - FET Open Programme, which supports early-stage research on any idea for a new technology (Grant Agreement no: 665337). It brings together 7 partners from 4 different countries. The project consortium is strongly interdisciplinary combining renowned experts from the fields of zoology, physics, mechatronics, life sciences, materials sciences, laser-matter interaction, production technology, tribology, and biomimetics. The second part will be focused on laser-assisted biomimetic surface texturing for neural tissue engineering applications. We show that the artificial surfaces obtained by femtosecond laser texturing of solids comprise dual scale quasiperiodic structures at the micro- and nano- length scales that better simulate the morphology of the extracellular matrix. The ability to precisely control the structures' geometry and pattern regularity is an important advantage for the use of the laser-fabricated surfaces as models to study the dependence of growth, division and differentiation of cells on topographical cues. It is shown that the geometrical characteristics of the biomimetic surfaces alone could drive the directional outgrowth of neurons, glial cells as well as complex cell cultures of the peripheral nervous system. This distinct inherent property of the microstructures to direct cell outgrowth, combined with the conductance of the material, could potentially be useful for patterning neurons into artificial networks.

K.I.5
11:00
Authors : Philipp Comanns (1), Kai Winands (2), Emmanuel Stratakis (3), Werner Baumgartner (4)
Affiliations : 1 RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Biology II, Worringerweg 3, 52074 Aachen, Germany; 2 Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT, Steinbachstr. 17, 52074 Aachen, Germany; 3 Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, 71110 Heraklion, Greece; 4 JKU Linz, Institute of Biomedical Mechatronics, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz, Austria

Resume : The handling of liquids plays an important role in various technical applications. Wetting properties, and in many cases also a specific transport of liquids, are essential for efficient functionality, e.g. in fields of lubrication. In nature we find many species that are highly adapted to their environment, in particular in areas of water scarcity. One example is the moisture-harvesting Texas horned lizard, which has special skin structures, such as capillary channels in between the scales, that enable the lizard to collect water by capillarity and to transport it to the snout for drinking. This fluid transport is passive and directional towards the lizard's snout. The directionality is based on geometric principles, namely a periodic pattern of interconnected half-open capillary channels that narrow and widen. Following a biomimetic approach, the underlying principles were transferred to technical demonstrator design and manufacturing with laser ablation. Physical background and implications for scalability will be provided. For both, water collection on the body surface of lizards and the technical demonstrators, liquid transport was analysed using high-speed video microscopy. The structures for passive directional liquid transport could lead to process improvements and reduction of resources in many technical applications, e.g. in fields of lubrication and micro-analysis devices.

K.I.6
11:15
Authors : Johannes Heitz (a), Cristina Plamadeala (a), Florian Hischen (b), Gerda Buchberger (b), Werner Baumgartner (b)
Affiliations : (a) Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria; (b) Institute of Biomedical Mechatronics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria

Resume : Nature always served as inspiration for scientists, helping them to solve a large diversity of technical problems. In our case, we are interested in wetting and liquid transport on surfaces. We used the flat bug Dysodius lunatus as a role model for this application. This Neotropical bug is widely distributed in South- and Central America and lives on and under the bark of various rainforest trees, associated to and feeding on different fungi growing there. Dysodius lunatus shows different types of pronounced microstructures at their cuticle that are important for wetting and fluid transportation. We present arrays of polymer microstructures produced by laser-writing techniques that mimic the micro-ornamentation from the bugs’ cuticle and that can control the fluid dynamics.

K.I.7
11:30
Authors : S. V. Kirner (1), U. Hermens (2), K. Winands (2), H. Mescheder (2), C. Florian (3), J. Solis (3), J. Siegel (3), F. Hischen (4), W. Baumgartner (4), E. Skoulas (5), A. Mimidis (5), E. Stratakis (5), D. Spaltmann (1), J. Krüger (1), J. Bonse (1)
Affiliations : (1) Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin, Germany (2) Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT, Steinbachstr. 17, D-52074 Aachen, Germany (3) Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica – CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid, SPAIN (4) Institute of Biomedical Mechatronics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, A-4040 Linz, Austria (5) Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Heraklion, GR-71110 Crete, Greece

Resume : Nature provides countless examples of surface structures featuring extraordinary properties such as directional fluid transport. In order to mimic the morphology and outstanding wetting behaviour of bark bugs, ultrashort laser pulses with durations in the fs- to ps-range were employed for large area surface processing of steel. By scanning the laser beam across the surface of initially polished flat sample surfaces and systematically varying the laser processing parameters (peak fluence, scan velocity, line overlap), different regimes associated with characteristic surface morphologies (laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), grooves, spikes, etc.) could be identified. Additionally, different laser processing strategies were applied, varying laser wavelength, pulse duration and repetition rates, which allowed to achieve a range of morphologies that resemble different structures found on bark bugs. For identifying the ideal combination of parameters for mimicking such bug-like structures, the surfaces were inspected by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy. Complementary to the morphology study, the wetting behaviour of the surface structures for water and oil was examined intensively in terms of fluid transport and philic/-phobic nature. Additionally, with these results in hand, tribological tests investigating the wear resistance of the laser-induced nano- and microstructures were carried out. Our results demonstrate that the functionality of surface structures found in nature could be transferred to technologically relevant materials, such as steel, providing a huge potential for industrial applications for instance in friction and wear reduction.

K.I.8
11:45
Authors : Camilo Florian, Daniel Puerto, Yasser Fuentes-Edfuf, Evangelos Skoulas, Emmanuel Stratakis, Philipp Comanns, Javier Solis, Jan Siegel
Affiliations : Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica – CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid, SPAIN; Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Heraklion, GR-71110 Crete, Greece; RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biology II, Worringerweg 3, 52074 Aachen, Germany

Resume : Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses are characterized by their high peak intensity, short duration and can be focused down to submicrometer-sized regions, enabling high-precision processing of virtually any material with reduced collateral damage. Moreover, also weakly focused pulses have the potential to produce nanometer structures that self-organize under certain irradiation conditions. Such structures, known as LIPSS (laser-induced periodic surface structures), are potential candidates for mimicking surface textures found in nature, on materials of technological interest, allowing their functionalization e.g. in terms of wettability, optical response, and wear resistance. Here, we present different laser-fabricated surface structures that resemble the skin of moisture harvesting lizards and other reptiles. The fabrication process is based on a high-repetition rate fs laser (1030 nm, 350 fs, up to 2 MHz) and a galvo-scanner combined with a F-theta lens, allowing large-area processing. Different bio-mimetic structures are produced and morphological analysis reveals that their feature size and geometry strongly depends on the irradiation parameters, providing means to design novel and functional structures. In fact, we demonstrate that the wetting properties are strongly affected and can be controlled by tuning the irradiation conditions. The strategy presented here provides new perspectives for increasing fluid transport, improving biocompatibility, and tuning tribological properties of materials.

K.I.9
12:00
Authors : U. Hermens (1), S.V. Kirner (2), C. Emonts (3), P. Comanns (3), E. Skoulas (4), A. Mimidis (4), H. Mescheder (1), K. Winands (1), J. Krüger (2), E. Stratakis (4), J. Bonse (2)
Affiliations : (1) Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT, Steinbachstr. 17, D-52074 Aachen, Germany; (2) Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin, Germany; (3) RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biology II, Worringerweg 3, D-52074 Aachen; (4) Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Heraklion, GR-71110, Crete, Greece

Resume : The wetting behavior of material surfaces can be controlled by surface structures. We functionalized case-hardened alloyed carbon steel to modify the wetting behavior using ultrashort laser pulses (fs- to ps-range). The laser processing was performed by scanning the laser beam across the surface of initially polished flat sample material. An experimental study of the laser processing parameters (peak fluence, scan velocity, line overlap) rendered an assignment of different regimes associated with characteristic surface morphologies (laser-induced periodic surface structures, grooves, micro cones, etc.) possible. Analyzing the surface using optical as well as scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of morphologies providing the optimum similarity to the natural skin of non-moisture havesting lizards. For mimicking skin structures of moisture-harvesting lizards, additionally a two-step laser processing strategy was established for realizing hierarchical microstructures. In this approach, micrometer-scaled capillaries (step 1) were superimposed by a laser-generated regular array of small dimples (step 2). Optical focus variation imaging measurements finally revealed the three dimensional topography of the laser processed surfaces derived from lizard skin structures. The functionality of these surfaces was analyzed in view of wetting and directional fluid transport properties. The results suggest possible applications of the laser-structured surfaces.

K.I.10
12:15 Lunch    
13:10
Authors : Prof. Julian R Jones
Affiliations : Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ

Resume : A goal in tissue regeneration is to mimic the structure of host tissues and replicate their mechanical properties with synthetic biomaterials, in order to facilitate healing and tissue regeneration. Here, sol-gel hybrids with interpenetrating co-networks of degradable polymers and bioactive silica, are described that have unprecedented mechanical properties. The properties can be tailored to match those of bone or cartilage. Using the inherent gelation of the sol-gel process, new ?inks? for direct 3D printing of the hybrids have been developed to produce bespoke pore architectures, creating a new generation of ?bouncy? hybrids suitable to restore damaged cartilage. Specific pore morphology promotes high quality cartilage production. Polymer choice is very important. Originally, polypeptides (e.g. gelatin and poly-glutamic acid), and polysaccharides (e.g. chitosan) were used but now we turn to bespoke synthetic polymers, including star-shaped polymers made by controlled polymerisation. Certain hybrids also showed self-healing capacity. Structure-property relationships will be discussed.

K.I.11
13:30
Authors : Prof. Masaru Tanaka1,2, Shingo Kobayashi1,2, Takashi Hoshiba 2, Kazuki Fukushima2, Fumihiro Aratsu1, Daiki Murakami1
Affiliations : 1Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University. 2Frontier Center for Organic Materials, Yamagata University. masaru_tanaka@ms.ifoc.kyushu-u.ac.jp tanaka@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp http://www.soft-material.jp/ http://www.bio-material.jp/

Resume : Numerous parameters of soft-biomaterials can affect biocompatibility (stelth or bio-innert). The mechanisms responsible for the biocompatibility at the molecular level have not been clearly demonstrated, although many theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to understand them. Moreover, water interactions have been recognized as fundamental for the biological fluids response to contact with materilas. We proposed the ?Intermediate Water? concept, and hypothesized that Intermediate Water, which prevents the proteins and cells from directly contacting the material surface, or non-freezing water on the material surface, plays an important role in the biocompatibility of materilas. Intermediate Water exhibited clearly defined peaks for cold crystallization in the differential scanning calorimetry, a strong peak at 3400 cm-1 in a time-resolved Infrared spectrum and higher mobility of water in a 2H-NMR. Intermediate Water was found only in hydrated biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids, DNA and RNA) and hydrated biocompatible synthetic polymers. Intermediate Water could be one of the main screening factors for the design of appropriate biocompatible materials. This presentation provides an overview of the recent experimental progress of soft-biomaterials measured by thermal, spectroscopic, and surface force techniques. Recent selected references about Intermediate Water: http://www.nature.com/pj/journal/v45/n7/full/pj2012229a.html

K.I.12
13:50
Authors : Insung S. CHOI
Affiliations : Center for Cell-Encapsulation Research, Department of Chemistry, KAIST, Korea

Resume : Nature has developed a fascinating strategy of cryptobiosis for counteracting the stressful, and often lethal, environmental conditions. For example, certain bacteria sporulate to transform from a metabolically active, vegetative state to an ametabolic endospore state. The bacterial endospores, encased within tough biomolecular shells, withstand the extremes of harmful stressors, such as radiation, desiccation, and malnutrition, for extended periods of time and return to a vegetative state by breaking their protective shells apart when their environment becomes hospitable for living. Inspired by cryptobiosis found in nature, researchers have sought to chemically control and tailor the metabolic behaviors of non-spore-forming cells as well as enhancing their viability against adverse environmental conditions, by forming thin (< 100 nm), tough artificial shells [1-5]. These living “cell-in-shell” structures, called artificial spores, enable chemical control of cell division, protection against physical and chemical stresses, and cell-surface functionalizability, armed with exogenous properties that are not innate to the cells but are introduced chemically. The field has further advanced to the stage of chemical sporulation and germination, where cytoprotective shells are formed on living cells and broken apart on demand. The (degradable) cell-in-shell hybrids are anticipated to find their applications in various biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, such as cytotherapeutics, high-throughput screening, sensors, and biocatalysis, as well as providing a versatile research platform for single-cell biology. In this sense, the artificial spore can be considered as a micrometric Iron Man: what is important is not the shell but the cell inside the shell. Acknowledgements. I.S.C. acknowledges the financial support from the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (MSIP 2012R1A3A2026403). References 1- J. H. Park, D. Hong, J. Lee, I. S. Choi, Acc. Chem. Res. (2016) 49, 792-800 (review). 2- J. H. Park, S. H. Yang, J. Lee, E. H. Ko, D. Hong, I. S. Choi, Adv. Mater. (2014) 26, 2001-2010 (progress report). 3- D. Hong, M. Park, S. H. Yang, J. Lee, Y.-G. Kim, I. S. Choi, Trends Biotechnol. (2013) 31, 442-447 (opinion). 4- S. H. Yang, D. Hong, J. Lee, E. H. Ko, I. S. Choi, Small (2013) 9, 178-186 (concept). 5- “C&EN talks with Insung Choi, cell protector”, Chem. Eng. News (2016) 94(43), 23-24.

K.I.13
14:10
Authors : Dr. Grazia Maria Lucia Messina
Affiliations : Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology - Dept. of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania, Italy

Resume : Protein-based biomaterials are of great interest for the biomedical field because of their potential use as prosthesis as well as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. The potential inspiring models are mainly proteins able to confer mechanical properties to tissues and organs, such as elasticity and strength. The proper combination of repetitive sequences, each of them derived from different proteins, represents a useful tool for obtaining biomaterials with tailored mechanical properties and biological functions. The design of artificial constructs as 3D models, that recapitulate crucial aspects of the native cellular microenvironment, has been found mandatory to realize in vitro cell culture which overcome the traditional unnatural 2D paradigm, and, in perspective, valuable substitutes for tissues and organs compromised by trauma or diseases. In recent years, much attention has been paid to formulate matrices characterized by a nanofibrous surface that mimics the ECM. In addition to lithography techniques for nanopatterning and electrospinning, the self-assembly is emerging as bio-inspired technique. Nature often uses this strategy to get nano- and micro-meter structures built from very small molecules by means of intermolecular forces, primarily consisting in hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions. Self-Assembling Peptides (SAPs) are an example of such molecules The self-organization process is shown to be severely affected by the type of peptide and surface properties, including specifically the charge state at a given pH. The results strongly support a self-assembly mechanism based onto a very specific organization processes at the liquid-solid interface, based onto the active role played by the surfaces to promote the orientation and organization of single molecules as the prime processes at nanometer scale, followed by the aggregation process at the mesoscopic scale. This presentation will focus on the study of different peptides immobilized on surface and on their response to cell adhesion.

K.I.14
14:30
Authors : Prof. Fabio Variola
Affiliations : Department of Mechanical Engineering/Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Resume : In the quest for the next generation of functional biomaterials, researchers have sought inspiration from nature by developing better performing bio-derived materials, reproducing naturally occurring micro and nanostructures and devising strategies that mimic naturally occurring phenomena [1]. In this context, our team has joined these efforts to employ bio-inspired structures and approaches in biomaterials research, aiming at creating platforms and interface to understand and control cellular events. In particular, we successfully reproduced a bioactive nanoporosity on titanium capable of positively affecting cell activity providing antibacterial properties [2,3]. Noteworthily, these methods also permitted to achieve a nanometric 3-dimensional hierarchical surface that mimics that of biologically successful life forms such as diatoms [4]. These surfaces are currently exploited to close in on the mechanisms that control how cells respond to nanotopographical surfaces. In particular, our team focuses on the correlation between nanoscale features and specific cellular functions. Moreover, we are currently working on biologically inspired adhesive interfaces because of their potentially beneficial applications in medicine, technology and industry. In particular, we focus on understanding the effects on cells of poly(dopamine) [5], an adhesive polymer derived from mussels, both as a multifunctional layer or as an intermediate linker to immobilize bioactive molecules. In parallel, our team has also contributed to the development collagen- and chitosan-based materials for applications ranging from tissue engineering to drug delivery [6,7]. References: [1] Meyers M. A., and Chen, P.-Y., Biological Materials Science, Cambridge University Press (2014) [2] Vetrone F., Variola F., Tambasco de Oliveira P., Zalzal S. F., Yi J.-H., Sam J., Bombonato-Prado K. F., Sarkissian A., Perepichka D. F., Wuest J. D., Rosei F., Nanci A., Nanoscale oxidative patterning of metallic surfaces to modulate cell activity and fate, Nano Letters, 9, 659-65 (2009) [3] Variola F., Zalzal, S.F., Leduc A., Barbeau J., Nanci A., Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties, International Journal of Nanomedicine, 9, 2319–2325 (2014) [4] Losic D., Mitchell J. G., Lal R., Voelcker N. H., Rapid Fabrication of Micro- and Nanoscale Patterns by Replica Molding from Diatom Biosilica, Advanced Functional Materials, 17, 2439–2446 (2007) [5] Steeves A. J., Atwal A., Schock S. C., Variola F., Evaluation of the direct effects of poly(dopamine) on the in vitro response of human
osteoblastic cells, Journal Materials Chemistry B, 4, 3145-3156 (2016) [6] Cassani D. A. D., Altomare L., De Nardo L., Variola F., Physicochemical and nanomechanical investigation of electrodeposited chitosan: PEO blends, Journal of Materials Chemistry B, 3, 2641-2650 (2015) [7] Amrani S., Atwal A., Variola F., Modulating the elution of antibiotics from nanospongy titanium surfaces with a pH-sensitive coating, RSC Advances, 5, 93666-93675 (2015)

K.I.15
14:50
Authors : Prof. Karsten Haupt
Affiliations : Sorbonne Universités, Compiègne University of Technology CNRS Institute for Enzyme and Cell Engineering, Compiègne, France

Resume : Biomimicry is the general term covering any approach aimed at reproducing artificially essential properties of one or more biological systems. This is done in order to exploit natural mechanisms or materials for direct applications in different technological domains. One of the main application areas of biomimicry is materials science. At the molecular level, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are an example, mimicking molecular recognition phenomena. MIPs are synthetic antibody mimics that specifically recognize molecular targets. They are highly cross-linked polymers that are synthesized through the polymerization of monomers bearing suitable functional groups, in the presence of the target molecule acting as a molecular template. This templating induces three-dimensional binding sites in the cross-linked polymer network that are complementary to the template in terms of size, shape and chemical functionality. Thus, these so-called 'plastic antibodies' can recognize and bind their targets with an affinity and selectivity similar to biological antibodies. We present new approaches allowing for the synthesis of MIP by chemiaclly and spatially controlled radical polymerization. This allows for example to obtain protein-size, soluble MIP nanogels with a homogeneous size distribution. They show specific binding of their targets, small organic molecules or proteins, with a nanomolar affinity and a good selectivity. Since MIPs are compatible with standard micro and nanofabrication techniques, they can also be obtained in any other physical form, and at the same time interfaced with other materials, resulting in nanocomposites. The use of these functional nanomaterials for affinity separation, biosensing, bioimaging and other applications will be discussed.

K.I.16
15:10
Authors : Prof. Bert Müller
Affiliations : Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, Switzerland

Resume : Caries is the most frequent disease worldwide. [1]. The disease brings the mineral crystallites of the crowns into solution and therefore reduces their mechanical properties. The crowns consist of a unique, biologically ordered material with internal interfaces. In healthy condition, the structures remain stable for the entire human lifespan and even beyond. Currently, no engineering process is known to bio-mimetically repair this fascinating material with the well-defined organization down to the nanometer level. The economic impact of the therapies is enormous. The World Health Organization estimated that the dental treatment costs accounted for 5 % to 10 % of healthcare budgets in industrialized countries. So far, therapy relies on the mechanical replacement of decayed tissue by isotropic polymers, ceramics, or composites. The analysis of the healthy and diseased crowns down to the nanometer scale has led to the anatomical knowledge for developing nature-analogue dental fillings, which contain elongated nanostructures with the orientations clearly identified in dentin and enamel [2]. Furthermore, the detailed analysis of the caries pathology using spatially resolved X-ray scattering has shown that while bacterial processes dissolve the minerals in enamel and dentin, the dentinal collagen network remains unaffected, enabling the development of therapies to re-mineralize the dentin [3,4]. As other research teams we struggle to reproduce the unique biological material having hierarchically ordered structures down to the nanometer scale. This is demanding, as for example, human enamel consists of ordered calcium phosphate crystallites organized in a fibrous continuum. Note, human enamel is about three times tougher than the geological counterpart and much less brittle than sintered material. The detailed understanding of the mineralization processes of enamel in the oral cavity is not only essential to further improve human health but will also generate the necessary basis for the bio-inspired fabrication of hierarchically organized materials with unique, locally varying, anisotropic properties.

K.I.17
15:30
Authors : Franck TANCRET, Jingtao ZHANG, Weizhen LIU, Olivier GAUTHIER, Sophie SOURICE, Paul PILET, Gildas RETHORE, Khalid KHAIROUN, Jean-Michel BOULER, Pierre WEISS
Affiliations : Université de Nantes, France Oniris, Nantes, France

Resume : A major challenge in the design of biomaterial-based injectable bone substitutes is the development of cohesive, macroporous and self-setting calcium phosphate cements (CPC) that enable rapid cell invasion with adequate initial mechanical properties without the use of complex processing. We propose a simple and effective strategy to prepare injectable macroporous CPCs through syringe foaming using a hydrophilic viscous polymeric solution as a foaming agent, that simultaneously meets all the aforementioned aims. The resulting foamed composite CPCs demonstrate excellent handling properties such as injectability and cohesion. After hardening the foamed composite CPCs possess both macropores and micropores and their mechanical properties are comparable to those of cancellous bone. Moreover, a preliminary in vivo study in rabbit femurs was conducted to evaluate the biofunctionality of this material. Our in vivo studies show the existence of newly formed bone within the implantation site, indicating the feasibility and effectiveness of this foaming strategy, which could be used in various CPC systems using various hydrophilic viscous polymeric solutions.

K.I.18
15:45
Authors : Paul Wolff(1), Laura Heimann(1), Gregor Liebsch (2), Robert J. Meier(2), Martijn van Griensven(1), Elizabeth R. Balmayor(1).
Affiliations : (1) Experimental Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. (2) PreSens Precision Sensing GmbH, Regensburg, Germany.

Resume : Tissue engineering approaches on the reconstitution of critical sized defects typically encounter the problem of adequate oxygen supply within the biomaterial construct. The lack of sufficient oxygen may manifest itself in hypoxic areas appearing within the scaffold. Hypoxic environments are known to affect the physiological status of cells exposed to it. Associated mechanistic changes are thought to be of major importance for cell-fate decisions, which in turn are of particular interest in the field of TE. In this study, we intended to analyse the level of dissolved oxygen within various cell-loaded musculoskeletal TE constructs in vitro, featuring collagen I based gels, as well as polycaprolactone-based three-dimensional scaffolds, respectively. For the analysis of the oxygen levels in situ, we employ optical fibre-based micro sensor setups (MicroxTX, PreSens) for static (MicroxTX3) and dynamic (MicroxTX4) profiling measurements, as well as a camera supported non-invasive optical sensor foil-based technique (VisiSens, PreSens). These complementary analytical tools enable the identification, localization, and temporal follow-up investigation of designated areas within TE constructs. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) cultured in collagen I gels under normoxic conditions were analysed periodically – thereby revealing dynamic changes of the level of dissolved oxygen inside the gel constructs, respectively. Dependent on the applied cell concentration, the in vitro cO2 within the gels reached physiological ranges after 21d, or 35d of culture, respectively. The minimal cO2 was measured after 35d in vitro, featuring an oxygen level of 4.8 ± 1.3 %. Upon prolonged culture, a plateau-like status of the cO2 around 8-10 % established, indicating a change in the physiological activity of the cells under investigation. This data shows the dynamic nature of the oxygen distribution within TE constructs. In line with this, we proclaim the applied technique as an ideal tool for the evaluation of multiple parameters affecting the oxygen distribution in vitro, including the choice of biomaterial, its architectural design, as well as the applied culture conditions, respectively.

K.I.19
16:00
Authors : Sindre H. Bjørnøy1, David C Bassett1, Manuel Schweikle2, Hanna Tiainen2, Berit Løkensgard Strand3, Seniz Ucar4, Jens-Petter Andreassen4, Pawel Sikorski1
Affiliations : 1Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. 2Department of Biomaterials, University of Oslo, Norway. 3Department of Biotechnology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Resume : Natural bone tissue is a highly complex, hierarchically structured composite mainly comprised of highly mineralized (calcium phosphate, CaP) collagen. In the context of tissue engineering, attempts are being made to make artificial composite materials which resemble bone and which, in combination with biological factors, could enhance bone tissue regeneration or replace bone fragments. Hydrogel-based composites offer several advantages in this regard, since they can be made to be injectable and biocompatible and furthermore they can be easily combined with cells and/or mineral precursors. Mineral precursors provide a means to mineralize hydrogels in situ which is a useful and convenient method to rapidly provide an inorganic template to stimulate natural bone regeneration whilst maintaining injectable and cell friendly features. A thorough understanding of the mineralization process is essential to enable precise control over mineralization pathways which will ultimately determine the regenerative potential of such a material. To this end we have described a system in which hydrogel mineralization processes can be studied in a correlative manner using a range of experimental methods, many of which may be applied in real time with high spatio-temporal resolution. In particular we have focused on microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to investigate mineralization and mineral phase transformations of alginate/CaP composites. We also show how the same approach can be used to study and optimize the mineralization of other hydrogel systems such as collagen and PEG. The experimental design allows us to follow mineral formation in the hydrogel and to optimize conditions to achieve a desired mineralization in terms of crystalline phase and content.

K.I.20
16:15
Authors : Fotini Pappa, V. Karagkiozaki1, P. Gkertsiou1, S. Kassavetis1, E. Pavlidou2, Th. Choli-Papadopoulou3, S. Logothetidis1
Affiliations : 1. Laboratory for “Thin Films, Nanobiomaterials, Nanosystems and Nanometrology” (LTFN), Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece 2. Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece 3. Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Resume : Neurodegenerative diseases are considered to be a significant challenge of 21st century, due to the difficulty of the nervous system to be restored after s severe damage. Recently, the application of Nanomedicine as a valuable tool for the detection and treatment of Neurodegenerative diseases used in order to improve functional neuroprotective agents and enhance the restoration of affected neural tissues. In this study we proceed towards the fabrication of a Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) /PEDOT: PSS non-woven scaffold by Electrospinning process and explored its application as nerve guide substrate and regenerative agent in vitro. The surface morphology, hydrophilicity and chemical composition were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Contact Angle measurement (CA) respectively. SEM micrographs revealed the fibrous matrices and the physicochemical behaviour of these structures was divulged via contact angle measurements after proper chemical cross-linking. Neural cell line was cultivated onto the engineered matrices and in vitro studies indicated that electrospun PVA/PEDOT: PSS nano-fibrous scaffolds promoted neural cell adhesion, elongation and proliferation. Depth-sensing dynamic nanoindentation (DNI) with a Berkovich-type indenter was used to study the nanomechanical response of the fibrous scaffolds. The load-displacement DNI curves were analysed to estimate the elastic modulus (0.6 ± 0.08 GPa) and the hardness (0.02 ± 0.001) versus the nanoindenter displacement into the fibrous scaffold as well as to study its time-depended mechanical properties. Due to its advantage of high surface area for cell attachment, it is believed that this electrospun nerve fiber-based scaffold could find further application in cell therapy for nerve regeneration in future, in order to improve functional regeneration outcome, especially for longer nerve defect restoration. Acknowledgement: This work was partially supported by NanoReg II project, and the National Project NANOCARDIO

K.I.21
16:30
Authors : Leticia Esteban, M. Daniela Angione, Thomas Duff, Adam Myles, Joana Vasconcelos, Federico Zen, Eoin M. Scanlan, Paula E. Colavita
Affiliations : School of Chemistry and AMBER Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin D2, Ireland

Resume : Carbohydrates are important biomolecules involved in a diverse array of biological functions including cell communication, biofilm formation and inflammatory responses. The immobilization of carbohydrates onto surfaces is of interest for the development of new biomimetic materials and of new methods for understanding processes in glycobiology. Surface-bound glycans can potentially be used for tailoring the response of organisms to solid surfaces, for improving our understanding of carbohydrate–protein interactions and/or for studying fundamental processes in glycobiology. Therefore, there has been great interest in developing new strategies for the preparation of functional glycosylated materials. We have developed an surface modification method for the immobilization of carbohydrates based on the chemistry of aryldiazonium cations, which offers a one-step solution route to the covalent immobilization of glycans onto surfaces ranging from metals, to carbon and polymers. This presentation will discuss how functionalisation is achieved and how the surface modification reaction must be tailored to be applicable in the case of selected polymers. We use a combination of surface spectroscopies, fluorescence imaging and nanogravimetry to demonstrate that glycans are covalently bound to the surfaces and presented with conformations that allow for lectin recognition. Finally, we discuss applications of these layers to fouling prevention in protein rich media and in field studies.

K.I.22
16:45
Authors : Mitsuhiro Terakawa
Affiliations : Keio University

Resume : Technology for fabricating desirable shape and structure with biomaterials is essential to realize biocompatible devices. Tissue scaffolds, for example, require microprocessing technology for forming tailored structures depending on applications. Sub-micro- or nanoprocessing of a material surface is effective for controlling cell adhesion and growth as well. Furthermore, recent advance in 3D internal processing and internal structure integration opens new horizons for cell stimulation. Structures fabricated by 3D processing technology have the potential to realize novel electro, optical, and robotic devices. Femtosecond laser has great advantages in the processing of biomaterials due to its extremely short pulse duration and high peak intensity with modest average power. Precision structures composed of biomaterials are able to be fabricated without significant thermal modification. Since a great number of biomaterials including polymers show higher transmittance for visible to near-infrared wavelength, three dimensional structures can be fabricated via multiphoton absorption by using femtosecond laser. In the presentation, ultrafast laser processing of biomaterials will be described in terms of both subtractive and additive techniques. As for the former case, laser processing of biodegradable polymers is discussed in detail. In addition to experimental and fundamental results on the laser processing of the biodegradable polymers, we demonstrate the change in biodegradation rate of the polymer following laser ablation. The result shows the potential to control the degradation and sustainability of a fabricated structure following implantation. As for the latter case, our study on the laser-based fabrication of metal microstructure in a biomaterial will be presented. The silver structure is fabricated inside a biocompatible flexible material. Shrinking and swelling of the fabricated structure is also demonstrated experimentally, which shows the potential of the method for realizing three-dimensional flexible devices.

K.I.23
 
Young Investigator Forum Keynote Session ( the 7 minutes presentations) : Organizers/Chairs-Federico Zen, PhD Student, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland & Valentine Blashchuk Bach D Student, TSN University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine . Supervisor Professor Dr. Masaru Tanaka, Kyushu University & Yamagata University, Japan
17:00
Authors : Seung-Mo Lee, Do Van Lam, André Gjardy, Ingrid Zenke , Wolfgang Wagermaier, Peter Fratzl
Affiliations : Seung-Mo Lee; Do Van Lam Department of Nanomechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), 156 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113, South Korea & Nano Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34103, South Korea André Gjardy; Ingrid Zenke; Wolfgang Wagermaier; Peter Fratzl Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Biomaterials, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany

Resume : Diverse biological organisms in nature have long used mineralization approach in order to secure mechanical stabilities of existing tissues, like toughness and strength. Currently, the mineralization has been widely regarded as a route for developing new biomimetic structural materials. Although the attempt to emulate the strategy has been long lasted, the real advances have been rare due to the lack of proper synthetic method. Here we report that metal infiltration, which is usually occurred during atomic layer deposition (ALD) process, can be an effective way to mineralize organic tissues in vapour phase. The tendon collagen mineralized by Zn led to drastic increases in both toughness (in terms of breaking energy) and strength of raw collagen in a dried state. In addition, the infiltrated Zn metals apparently induced considerable chemical and structural changes in the natural collagen structures. It is believed that this metal infiltration approach realized by ALD can be used as one of practical mineralization methods.

K.FI.1
17:00
Authors : Dr. Nanasaheb D. Thorat, Dr. Mohamed.Noor, Professor Tewfik.Soulimane‎ and Professor Syed A.M. Tofail
Affiliations : Materials & Surface Science Institute, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Sreelane, Castletroy, Co. Limerick, IRELAND

Resume : The use of light i.e. lasers, over the past few years, has emerged to be highly promising for cancer therapy modalities, most commonly the photothermal therapy method, which employs light absorbing dyes for achieving the photothermal damage of tumors, and the photodynamic therapy, which employs chemical photosensitizers that generate singlet oxygen that is capable of tumor destruction. However, recent advances in the field of nanoscience have seen the emergence of noble metal nanostructures with unique photo-physical properties, well suited for applications in phototherapy. Noble metal nanoparticles, on account of the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance, possess strongly enhanced visible and near-infrared light absorption, several orders of magnitude more intense compared to conventional laser phototherapy agents. The use of plasmonic nanoparticles as highly enhanced photo-absorbing agents has thus introduced a much more selective and efficient cancer therapy strategy, viz. plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT). The synthetic tunability of the optothermal properties and the bio-targeting abilities of the plasmonic gold-graphene nanostructures make the PPTT method furthermore promising. In the present work, we prepared gold-graphene nanostructures for possible photodynamic therapy. We studied Raman spectroscopy, XPS spectroscopy, XRD, TEM of these nanostructures to identify Gold-curcumin conjugation. Further photoactive Gold-curcumin nanoconjuagtes are employed in photodynamic therapy on cancer cells and pathogenic bacteria. Work highlight the in vitro cancer cell and pathogenic bacteria killing success using gold-curcumin coupled with near-infrared lasers and shown efficient mediator in Nano biotechnological applications.

K.FI.2
17:00
Authors : Dilara Jakupovic (1), Sarah Schock (2), Fabio Variola (1)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louis Pasteur University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; (2) Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada

Resume : The enteric nervous system (ENS) is commonly referred to as the ?second brain? due to its complex networks of neuronal cell types. The abnormalities in or the absence of these neurons have been shown to play a role in diseases of both the ENS and the central nervous system. Accordingly, electrophysiological studies of the ENS are critical in the characterization of the pathophysiology of enteric and neurodevelopmental diseases. However, to-date these studies have been limited by the difficulty of culturing enteric neurons in-vitro, as well as by their poor adhesion properties. Using a rapid and efficient culturing method developed by our group, different polymers were tested in order to assess their ability to promote adhesion of enteric neurons, as confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. Successfully, the most effective polymer was applied as a coating onto the glass surface of multichannel electrode arrays (MEAs) allowing for the analysis of neuron dynamics, and will continue to be used in order to elucidate fundamental knowledge of how neurons interact with surfaces. These results serve as a significant stepping-stone for the improvement of the in-vitro study of the ENS and will be used to gain a deeper understanding enteric diseases, ultimately contributing to the development of novel polymeric scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications.

K.FI.3
17:00
Authors : Roman Major1, Marek Sanak2, Mariusz Gajda3, Grzegorz Lis3, Krzysztof Czyz4, Marek Strzelec4, Roman Ostrowski4, Boguslaw Major1
Affiliations : 1 Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Reymonta St. 25, Cracow, PL. 2 Department of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 8 Skawinska Street, 31-066 Cracow, PL. 3 Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Histology, Kraków, Poland. 4 Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Warszawa, Poland

Resume : The functional scaffold for the cell culture was prepared from the animal aortic valve. The protocol for acquisition fragments of tissue has been developed. Properly crafted tissue was subjected to the acellularization process, which means the removal of cells from the tissue in order to obtain pure, non-degraded extracellular matrix. Elimination of cells from the tissue will be carried out by unconventional methods of materials science involving a laser ablation with different power and beam configuration and acoustic waves with different frequencies. Physical processes will be designed to cause the elimination of tissue cells. The process of removing the cells from the tissue will be compared with the conventional, enzymatic methods, currently used clinically. After the process of tissue acallurization, the surface functionalization consisting of applying polymer layers in the form of growth factors and anticoagulant drug carriers. Additionally amorphous carbon of a few nanometer was deposited. The thickness of the carbon coatings allowed to control the release of anticoagulant drugs. Finally, the human umbilical endothelial cells were cultured in order to mimic the function of the tissue being in direct contact with the blood under physiological conditions. After reaching the final form of the surface functionalization the tests were carried out in direct contact with human blood. As part of the statutory procedure histological analysis of material tissue origin material has been developed in cooperation with specialists from Jagiellonian University Medical College. The issue of the cell elimination from tissue, and then formation of new tissue on the basis of the extracellular matrix meets strong clinical interest, but at the moment states a complex issue from a scientific point of view. Acknowlegement The main theme of the work concerns the statutory works of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science PAS ?Z-2? and applied research project: ?Development of innovative bioactive prosthetic heart valve?. This project is implemented under the Program for Applied Research in the path A, according to the agreement PBS3 / A7 / 17/2015, funded by the National Centre for Research and Development

K.FI.4
17:00
Authors : Christopher Jay T. Robidillo, Jonathan G.C. Veinot
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry University of Alberta

Resume : Disease states are typically caused by accumulation of metabolites and biological intermediates that disrupt the normal operation of cells and tissues. The introduction of enzymes, catalytic protein molecules essential for normal biological function, which act on such metabolites into diseased tissues provides an attractive alternative for curing such diseases. Silicon nanocrystals, owing to their nontoxicity and photostability, offer a safer and more efficient bioimaging platform compared to status quo organic dyes. Thus, a hybrid material consisting of enzyme molecules that have been interfaced with silicon nanocrystals can potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapy. This study reports, for the first time, a procedure for the preparation of enzyme-conjugated silicon nanocrystals from native enzymes and alkene-terminated silicon nanocrystals through photochemical thiol-ene reaction. Glucose oxidase and lactase were successfully immobilized on silicon nanocrystals as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Moreover, single reaction and cascade kinetic assays confirm that the immobilized enzymes retain catalytic activity. The method reported is general and can be used to prepare enzyme-silicon nanocrystal hybrids that can be employed in personalized medicine for targeting and potentially treating diseases like cancer and other metabolic disorders.

K.FI.5
17:00
Authors : Luciana D. Trino 1 Erika S. Bronze-Uhle 1 Amsaveni Ramachandran 2 Mathew T. Mathew 3 Anne George 2 Paulo N. Lisboa-Filho 1
Affiliations : 1 São Paulo State University (Unesp), School of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil 2 University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA 3 University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL, USA

Resume : Osseointegration process involves a cascade of biological events which are directly affected by the physical chemistry of the material surface, making them key determinants of the implant's success. Nano-surface topography provides a more reliable osseointegration response. Moreover the presence of biomolecules can accelerate bone anchorage to the implant. Since the biological mechanisms at the interface determine the fate of the implant, we hypothesize that the use of oxides in the nanometric scale functionalized with osteogenic peptides may play a central role in osseintegration. TiO2 and ZnO deposition upon Ti cp substrates was performed by spin coating technique. The samples were functionalized with APPA and MPA spacers and in sequence with peptides derived from DMP1. Surface characterization, corrosion tests, and biological assays employing hMSC cells were developed. XPS analysis revealed the functionalization success. Surface measurements demonstrated that nano-bio functionalized Ti presented higher surface roughness with improved cell adhesion. Proliferation assay with TiO2 MPA DMP1 and ZnO APPA DMP1 showed enhanced cell viability. Marker genes for osteoblast were upregulated in the presence of the peptides, presenting a positive influence in hMSC osteogenic differentiation. Corrosion tests showed that functionalized samples were more resistant. These findings suggest that nano-bio functionalization is a way for designing relevant implants in regenerative medicine.

K.FI.6
17:00
Authors : Joana M. Vasconcelos, Federico Zen, Daniela M. Angione, Ronan J. Cullen, Paula E. Colavita
Affiliations : School of Chemistry and Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland.

Resume : The ability to control and modulate interfacial interactions between a material and its host is a key factor in the rational design of biodevices. Numerous studies have focused on understanding the interaction of carbon with biomolecules, such as proteins and lipids, in order to explain and tune bioresponse. Carbon bioresponse is thought to depend on the composition/structure of an initially adsorbed protein/lipid layer, however, there is still a great controversy regarding the structure of the adsorbed layer and the role of this layer in terms of the resulting response in biological systems. Herein we report a comprehensive investigation into the correlation between the interfacial and physical-chemical properties of carbon and carbon-modified surfaces with the adsorption of model lipid assemblies on such surfaces. We used a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques in order to evaluate the conformation of lipid adsorption on carbon surfaces. The adsorption of phosphatidylcholine (PC) / phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes onto carbon and carbon-modified surfaces was investigated regarding buffer composition and surface chemistry. Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (IRRAS), Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy measurements were performed in order to understand the conformation of liposome adsorption on carbon surfaces. Finally, these studies allowed us to correlate carbon surface chemistry with the adsorption of model lipid assemblies and ultimately with the bio/hemo-compatibility of such surfaces.

K.FI.7
17:00
Authors : William Ho (Master's Student), Dr. Fabio Variola
Affiliations : University of Ottawa

Resume : Understanding cell behaviour at the material-host tissue interface is a fundamental prerequisite for designing the next generation of biomaterials, capable of directing cellular events towards desired biological outcomes. Nanoscale features are known to effect cellular phenomena and exert a direct mechanotransductive effect on cells. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing precise relationships between spatial arrangement of nanofeatures and specific cellular functions, such as focal adhesion (FA) formation. These clusters of adhesion molecules dictate cellular fate, and have been indicated as a key element in determining how cells sense and respond to substrates. To address this challenge, we developed semiordered nanotubular surfaces on titanium, the gold standard in medicine, tunable in terms of diameter and spacing. In addition, for the first time, a 3-dimensional hierarchical surface that mimics that of biologically successful life forms such as diatoms was created with a simple anodization approach. This additional surface will allow the probing of the effects of a nanotopographical height gradient. This study will distinctively (i) cast new light on the mechanisms that control cell-surface interactions by correlating the geometrical arrangement of nanoscale features to specific cellular functions, in particular the establishment of focal adhesions and (ii) evaluate the effects of a vertical nanotopographical gradient by exploiting a bioinspired surface.

K.FI.8
17:00
Authors : Rajeev Mudakavi, Surya Vanamali, Dipshikha Chakravortty, Ashok Raichur
Affiliations : Rajeev Mudakavi (+Presenter) Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India, Centre for BioSystems Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India, Surya Vanamali, Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India Dipshikha Chakravortty Microbiology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Science, India Centre for BioSystems Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India Ashok Raichur# Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India, Centre for BioSystems Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, India, #Corresponding author: amr@materials.iisc.ernet.in

Resume : Biomolecules engineered onto non-biological surfaces can be used to achieve specific effects in the biological system. One such requirement is to control the fate of the particles after endocytosis inside the cell. The handle on the endocytosed particle can lead us to target any particular organelle or part in a cell for therapy of cancer or intracellular infections. The intracellular vacuoles formed by certain pathogenic bacteria confer protection against host cellular defenses and render the currently used antibiotic therapy ineffective in clearing of the pathogen. The development of growing resistance in these intracellular pathogens is a direct consequence of insufficient antibiotic concentrations reaching such a shielded intracellular site. The shielded intracellular niche, in this case a specific vacuole created by Salmonella bacteria is called a Salmonella containing vacuole (SCV). This requires delivering higher antibiotic concentration in the infected cells. The ability to target infected cells and leave the uninfected cells requires active targeting by the nanoparticle system. This is achieved by employing arginine decorated particles to carry the antibiotics, by making use of enhanced arginine requirement by intracellular pathogens. The synthesized nanoparticle is able to enter the infected cell and deliver the antibiotic at the vacuolar site. This work translates from our group’s previous work demonstrating the enhanced arginine requirement by intracellular pathogens. Salmonella is used here as a model intracellular pathogen and this work finds easy translatability to other diseases caused by intracellular pathogens such as Tularaemia and Tuberculosis (TB).

K.FI.9
17:00
Authors : Leana Travaglini, Federica Fiorini, Giuseppe Alonci, Elena Longhi, Pietro Riva, Silvana Perretta, and Luisa De Cola
Affiliations : Leana Travaglini, Federica Fiorini, Giuseppe Alonci, Elena Longhi, Luisa De Cola Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, ISIS UMR 7006, 8 allée Gaspard MongeF-67000 Strasbourg, France Luisa De Cola Institut fur Nanotechnologie (INT) - Building 640, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany Pietro Riva, Silvana Perretta IHU Strasbourg, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Place de l?Hôpital 1, 67091 Strasbourg, France

Resume : Since their first introduction in 1960 [1] hydrogels have been firmly established as ideal materials for biomedical applications and tissue engineering due to their attractive features. Biocompatibility, high water content, [2] tissue-like elastic properties and 3D porous structures, which allow for the permeation of oxygen and nutrients, [3] made possible to widely exploit hydrogels as drug delivery systems, biosensors and scaffolds for cell culture.[4,5] Moreover, the possibility to introduce addressable groups in the gel network allows to finely tune the properties of the hydrogels in order to obtain smart biomaterials. In this presentation we report on some recent advances that have been made in our group in the preparation of biocompatible injectable polyamidoamine-based hydrogels for biomedical and imaging applications. Various hydrogels with different morphological, swelling and mechanical properties have been investigated in order to evaluate their properties as injectable adhesive sealants for tissue repair, showing outstanding properties. [1] Wichterle O., Lim D. Nature 185 (1960) 117-118 [2] Wang Q., Mynar J. L., Yoshida M., Lee E., Lee M., Okuro K., Kinbara K., Aida T. Nature 463 (2010) 339-343 [3] Loh Q. L., Choong C., Oxon D., Hons M., Mimmm C. Tissue Eng. Part B 19 (2013) 485-502 [4] Hoffman S. A. Adv. Drug Deliv. 1 (2002) 3-12 [5] Fiorini F., Prasetyanto E. A., Taraballi F., Pandolfi L., Monroy F., López-Montero I., Tasciotti E., L. De Cola Small 12 (2016) 4881-4893

K.FI.10
17:00
Authors : Skoulas.E, Mimidis.A, Stratakis.E
Affiliations : Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas (FORTH). Materials Science and Technology Department - University of Crete.

Resume : We report on a new, scalable method to fabricate at single-step, highly ordered, multi-directional, complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized utilizing the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond laser beams. It is concluded that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual-scale micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni surfaces upon line and large area scanning with radially and azimuthally polarized beams. Depending on the irradiation parameters, new and more complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark’s skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus’ leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed upon scanning with CV beams is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV optical fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser processing of materials, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of potential applications.

K.FI.11
17:00
Authors : K. Brassat, A. Keller, G. Grundmeier, W. Bremser, O. Strube, J. K. N. Lindner
Affiliations : Department of Physics, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany; Department of Chemistry, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany; Center for Optoelectronics and Photonics Paderborn CeOPP, Paderborn, Germany

Resume : Design of biocompatible surfaces with tailored morphology is crucial for the development of future devices for life science, medical applications and molecular electronics. The directed deposition of functional biological units into regular arrays with defined periodicity and defined amounts of deposited material, i.e. single units, makes conventional surface science compatible with the requirements of hydrid bio-electronic applications. We present two examples for surface nanopatterning with biological units by hierarchical self-assembly. We use nanosphere lithography to produce a thin film of metallic, semiconducting or dielectric material with self-organized hexagonally arranged circular free substrate antidots. These antidots exhibit a periodical topography and a chemical contrast. In the first example the material contrast between SiO2 antidots in a platinum film is used for the site-selective deposition of casein micelles into the antidots by enzyme-mediated autodeposition. By tuning the antidot size, we show how single protein micelles can be hexagonally arranged on large areas. In the second example, we combine the antidot patterns with molecular lithography via DNA origami. Single DNA triangles or DNA triangle assemblies are arranged inside mica antidots in gold films. The DNA origamis themselves exhibit the possibility of their use as templates for the hierarchical assembly of single proteins.

K.FI.12
17:00
Authors : L. Zajickova, E. Kedronova, J. Medalova, P. Cernochova, A. Stoica, M. Michlicek, A. Manakhov
Affiliations : CEITEC Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; CEITEC Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Faculty of Science Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; CEITEC Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; National University of Science and Technology, Moscow, Russia

Resume : Plasma polymerization provides a large playground for the preparation of surfaces suitable for immobilization of biomolecules and colonization by cells because chemical, structural and functional properties of plasma polymerized thin films can be tuned accordingly. In this work, plasma polymers containing amine or carboxyl groups, i.e. groups typically proposed to influence positively the attachment and proliferation of cells at surfaces, were prepared on polymer nanofibers. The nanofibrous membranes were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL] or mixture of PCL and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The latter material had tunable mechanical properties and biodegradation depending on the polymer mixture. Amine-rich films were deposited in the low pressure pulsed radio frequency (RF) discharge using vapors of cyclopropylamine mixed with argon. Carboxyl-rich films were prepared by plasma co-polymerization of maleic anhydride and acetylene in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge. The preliminary cell cultivation experiments were performed with mouse myoblast cell line C2C12. A remarkably increased cell adhesion was observed and the stable films improved cell proliferation. Preliminary experiments were performed also with spontaneously transformed immortal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT derived from adult human skin.

K.FI.13
17:00
Authors : Beom Jin Kim1, Sol Han1, Kyung-Bok Lee2, Insung S. Choi1
Affiliations : 1Center for Cell-Encapsulation Research, Department of Chemistry, KAIST, Daejeon 34141, Korea. 2Division of Bioconvergence Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 34133, Korea.

Resume : The nanoshell formation in cell encapsulation aims to isolate and protect living cells from harmful, often lethal, external environment in vivo and in vitro. So it has recently attracted a great deal of attention because of its potential applications in various fields, such as cell therapy, biocatalysts and sensors, and regenerative medicine, as well as providing research platforms for fundamental studies on single-cell biology. Although several strategies are available to form nanometric shells for cell encapsulation, most methods heavily reply on the time-consuming and multi-step processes. Therefore, it is highly desired in the field of cell nanoencapsulation to develop simple, fast, and cytocompatible chemical methods for nanoshell formation. We developed a chemical method of nanoshell formation via the interfacial supramolecular self-assembly of ferric ion (FeIII) and tannic acid (TA), and this synthetic strategy was applied to cell nanoencapsulation under various expermental settings by taking advantage of its superior characteristics, including simple and fast reaction under cytocompatible conditions. Its versatility is demonstrated with various interfaces: hollow microcapsules, encasing microbial or mammalian cells, are generated at the water-oil interface in the microfluidic device; a cytoprotective FeIII-TA shell forms rapidly on the surface of the alginate microbead that entraps probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus; moreover, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed with FeIII, responds to TA in the outside medium and forms a pericellular FeIII-TA shell. This reaction system will advance chemical manipulability of living cells and also suggest a new structural motif in materials science.

K.FI.14
17:00
Authors : Federico Zen, Vasilios D. Karanikolas, James Behan, Joana Vasconcelos, Jenny Andersson, Thomas Duff, Eoin M. Scanlan, Louise Bradley, Paula E. Colavita.
Affiliations : Federico Zen; James Behan; Joana Vasconcelos; Thomas Duff; Eoin M. Scanlan; Paula E. Colavita: School of Chemistry and AMBER Research Centre, University of Dublin Trinity College, College Green, Dublin, Ireland. Vasilios D. Karanikolas; Louise Bradley: School of Physics and Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), University of Dublin Trinity College, College Green, Dublin, Ireland. Jenny Andersson: Insplorion AB, Sahlgrenska Science Park, Medicinaregatan 8A, 413 90 Göteborg, Sweden.

Resume : Carbon materials have prompted great interest in the biomedical field due to their good performance as coating for prosthetics and medical devices. However to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. Mimicking the antifouling properties of the glycocalyx, found in certain cell membranes, offers a promising strategy to prevent clinical problems associated with nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins on implants. Herein protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Localized Surface Plasma Resonance (LSPR) and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) were used for in situ determinations of the dynamic of protein fouling at bare and modified amorphous carbon surfaces. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy was used to study ex situ adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption at carbohydrate layers was found to decrease by 30-90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces. Finally, Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model.

K.FI.15
 
Young Investigator Forum. Poster Session : Organizers/Chairs-Federico Zen, PhD Student, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland & Valentine Blashchuk Bach D Student, TSN University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine . Supervisor Professor Dr. Masaru Tanaka, Kyushu University & Yamagata University, Japan
18:30
Authors : Nanasaheb D. Thorat and Syed A.M. Tofail
Affiliations : Materials & Surface Science Institute, Bernal Institute University of Limerick, Ireland

Resume : Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) used for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques frequently face trade-off between a high magnetization saturation and their biophysical properties such as good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR) and most importantly biological compatibility. This necessitates the development of new nanomaterials as MFH and MRI are considered to be one of the most promising combined noninvasive tumor treatment. In the present study, we investigated polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles for efficient cancer hyperthermia therapy and MRI application. The superparamagnetic nanomaterial revealed a high saturation magnetization, colloidal stability, high SAR and excellent biocompatibility. A high SAR of 390 W/g was observed due to higher colloidal stability leading to an increased Brownian and Neel?s spin relaxation. Biocompatibility of PEG capped nanoparticles is up to ~ 80% on different cell lines tested rigorously using different methods. PEG coating provided excellent hemocompatibility to human red blood cells as PEG functionalized SPMNPs reduced hemolysis efficiently compared to its uncoated counterpart. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia of SPMNPs resulted in cancer cell death up to 80% within 60 min near 43-44 °C. Additionally, improved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics were observed for the PEG capped La1?xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) formulation in aqueous medium compared to the bare LSMO. Taken together, PEG capped SPMNPs can serve as a promising candidate for effective diagnosis, efficient magnetic fluid hyperthermia and multimodal cancer treatment as the amphiphilicity of PEG can be easily utilized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs.

K.FPI.1
18:30
Authors : Dilara Jakupovic (1), Sarah Schock (2), Fabio Variola (1)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louis Pasteur University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; (2) Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada

Resume : The enteric nervous system (ENS) is commonly referred to as the ?second brain? due to its complex networks of neuronal cell types. The abnormalities in or the absence of these neurons have been shown to play a role in diseases of both the ENS and the central nervous system. Accordingly, electrophysiological studies of the ENS are critical in the characterization of the pathophysiology of enteric and neurodevelopmental diseases. However, to-date these studies have been limited by the difficulty of culturing enteric neurons in-vitro, as well as by their poor adhesion properties. Using a rapid and efficient culturing method developed by our group, different polymers were tested in order to assess their ability to promote adhesion of enteric neurons, as confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. Successfully, the most effective polymer was applied as a coating onto the glass surface of multichannel electrode arrays (MEAs) allowing for the analysis of neuron dynamics, and will continue to be used in order to elucidate fundamental knowledge of how neurons interact with surfaces. These results serve as a significant stepping-stone for the improvement of the in-vitro study of the ENS and will be used to gain a deeper understanding enteric diseases, ultimately contributing to the development of novel polymeric scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications.

K.FPI.2
18:30
Authors : Heng-Yin Chen, Nelson G. Chen
Affiliations : Institute of Biomedical Engineering; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan

Resume : Spectrophotometric results for a well-known agarose-based ultrasonic tissue-mimicking gel phantom material, as developed by Madsen and colleagues, are reported for the purpose of temperature change detection. The gel consists of a combination of agarose, distilled water, n-propanol, and evaporated milk. Gels were cast into 2 mm thick cuvettes and allowed to cool to room temperature. Spectra obtained include those at room temperature and those following heating to temperatures between 30 and 80 degrees centigrade. Temperature elevation causes substantial irreversible changes in gel absorption spectra, with increased absorption between wavelengths of 800 to 1000 nm. Such spectral changes with heating may provide a means for estimating ultrasonically induced localized heating in this material, for instance with high-intensity focused ultrasound or other ultrasonic exposures.

K.FPI.3
18:30
Authors : Archana Gautam, Luong T. H. Nguyen, Kee Woei Ng
Affiliations : School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 Tel: +6587826653 Email: archana003@e.ntu.edu.sg

Resume : The rapid development in the field of nanotechnology has offered new prospects in various sectors. The engineered nanoparticles have been used extensively in myriad of applications due to their unique physiochemical properties. TiO2 and ZnO in particular are highly favored as UV-filters in skincare products. Despite them being considered innert at bulk phase, suggestion of their ability to penetrate the skin to reach viable cells and exert physiological influences has raised concerns. However, understanding of nanoparticle-mediated toxicity in skin is still limited. In light of this, this study reports on the toxicity of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles (pristine size 22±4 nm and 20±2 nm, respectively) on primary human skin cells- keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Using various in vitro assays to measure cell proliferation (Picogreen assay), cell metabolism (AlamarBlue assay), oxidative stress (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) and MitoSOX ™ Red mitochondrial superoxide indicator) and autophagy (Monodansylcadaverine staining), the effects of these nanoparticles were studied. Our 2D in vitro tests showed that, ZnO was significantly more toxic than TiO2 to both cell types. ZnO at 50 µg/ml caused acute cell death after 4-hour exposure and upon increasing the exposure to 24 hours, a lower concentration of 10 µg/ml was able to cause acute cell death. On the other hand, TiO2 at 1 mg/ml showed minimal toxic effects to cells after 4-hour exposure while 24-hour exposure to 100 µg/ml TiO2 caused significant toxicity. Analysis of oxidative stress via measurement of ROS and mitochondrial superoxide showed that both TiO2 and ZnO caused oxidative stress in cells at sub toxic concentration (10 µg/ml) which increased with dose and exposure. These nanoparticles were also able to induce autophagy in keratinocytes at very low concentrations (100 fg/ml and 500 pg/ml of TiO2 and ZnO, respectively). With these results as a benchmark, our next objective is to study and correlate the effects of these nanoparticles on skin cells in 3D cultures using our established full thickness organotypic skin model.

K.FPI.4
18:30
Authors : Roman Major1, Malgorzta Gonsior2, Marek Sanak3, Roman Kustosz2, Juergen M. Lackner4
Affiliations : 1 Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Reymonta St. 25, Cracow, PL. 2 Heart Prosthesis Institute, Artificial Heat Laboratory, Wolnosci 345A, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland 3 Department of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 8 Skawinska Street, 31-066 Cracow, PL. 4 Joanneum Research Forschungs-GmbH, Materials – Functional Surfaces, Leoben, A.

Resume : The, main goal of the work was to develop novel blood contacting composite materials for the re-design of the flexible mechanical ventricle assist device (VAD) heart valves. The idea was to elaborate metal-reinforced polymer composites. The studies performed have lead to the material selection for the surface modification of metallic scaffold. Haemo-compatible, biofunctional, ultra-elastic, thin carbon-based coatings were proposed. The surface was designed in order to eliminate thrombogenic and microbial construction by reduction of turbulence and sufficient washing of biofunctional-adapted surfaces and reduce heart assist costs allowing broad use for temporary heart support. A classical instrumentation for the dynamic test of hemocompatibility involves a flow chamber with a contact surface between blood stream and tested plate. In the current study we investigated a simplified model of the whole blood shear stress, based on a cone and plate rotational viscometer. Several indices of platelet activation were analyzed, including platelet- and granulocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet activation markers and platelet-derived microparticles. This model allowed to estimate platelet destruction, however no adhesion could be measured directly. In following tests of several polymer and metallic layer coated materials, the test revealed comparable performance to more laborious hemocompatibility experiments. Acknowlegement The main theme of the work concerns the statutory works of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science PAS “Z-2” and applied research project: “Nonthrombogenic metal-polymer composites with adaptable micro and macro flexibility for next generation heart valves in artificial heart devices”. This project is implemented under the Program for M-ERA.NET Transnational Call 2014, according to the agreement DZP/M-ERA.NET-2014/291/2015, funded by the National Centre for Research and Development

K.FPI.5
18:30
Authors : Federica Leone,1,2,3,4 Barbara Onida,1 Karen Wright,4 John G. Hardy2,3
Affiliations : 1 Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, 10129, Italy; 2 Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB, UK. 3 Materials Science Institute, Lancaster University, LA1 4YB, UK. 4 Department of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Lancaster University, LA1 4YG, UK

Resume : Wound dressings are materials designed to cover wounds, prevent infections and help injured tissues to repair and regenerate. This project aims to develop multifunctional conductive materials and test their efficacy for improving wound healing using an in vitro wound model. The bionanocomposite materials prepared are in principle capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutically active biomolecules and electrically stimulating cells, potentially thereby enhancing the rate of wound healing. The nanocomposite materials are based on polymers (e.g. polyacrylates and/or conducting polymers based on derivatives of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene and pyrrole monomers), and optionally inorganic materials such as nanostructured ZnO (synthesised using sol-gel techniques and loaded with drug models using established methods). The properties of the materials were characterized spectroscopically, thermally, microscopically, electrochemically, and mechanically. The in vitro delivery of therapeutically relevant model drugs was assessed spectroscopically, and in vitro cell culture experiments of a wound healing paradigm with/without electrical stimulation were carried out with relevant cells, and they have long term potential for optimization of for different wound niches.

K.FPI.6
18:30
Authors : Evangelos Skoulas, Emmanuel Stratakis
Affiliations : University of Crete, IESL, FORTH, Crete, Greece

Resume : The fabrication of artificial biomimetic surfaces fabricated via femtosecond laser processing is presented. Metallic, semiconductor and dielectric surfaces were irradiated and Laser Induced Surface Structures (LIPSS) were observed in each type of material surface. In particular femtosecond laser pulses with linear, circular, radial and azimuthal polarization states were utilized for structuring steel (metallic), silicon (semiconductor) and fused silica (dielectrics) surfaces. Experimental results showed that the direction of LIPSS in each case proved to be polarization dependent. A complete study was carried out for the investigation and understanding of LIPSS dependence on fluence value and the number of pulses per spot at variable beam polarization states and irradiation strategies, enabling the creation of new and more complex surface structures. Furthermore, we present a novel way to control the different LIPSS morphologies and geometries which were observed. Additionally large area surfaces were fabricated, tailored with various micro and nano structures bearing great structural resemblance with surfaces found in nature such as lotus leaf, shark skin and butterfly Greta Oto wing. Those bioinspired surfaces were found to exhibit remarkable optical and wetting properties which were attributed to the specific surface morphology. Thus femtosecond laser processing can be a novel and one single-step method for the fabrication of functional surfaces on almost all classes of solid materials.

K.FPI.7
18:30
Authors : Loh Yue Yan Amelia1, Nur Sabrina Wahid, Professor Tony Cass3 and Dr Tim Albrecht2
Affiliations : 1.Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London (similar for all authors) Email: y.loh16@imperial.ac.uk 2.Reader in Physical Chemistry
 Imperial College London, Department of Chemistry Email: t.albrecht@imperial.ac.uk 3.Imperial College London,Department of Chemistry Imperial College Rd, SW7 2AZ, London Email: t.cass@imperial.ac.uk

Resume : Nanopores sensing is a versatile technique for the detection and characterization of single charged molecules in solution which employs resistive pulse sensing. An ongoing challenge in nanopore sensing is in adapting to applications where specific molecules can be targeted. One would usually rely on surface modification of nanopores to include specific recognition elements; however, the preparation of the modified surface might be tedious and should be repeatable in order to produce high yield of similar pores. A key feature of the other method is the use of the specific mutual interaction of target-probe molecule without constructing a binding site in the nanopore. A recent approach that has been explored for imparting selectivity through unbound probe is by using DNA nanotechnology to assemble, by DNA origami technique, a linear dsDNA molecule with markers at known position to detect the target analyte. Interaction of the target analyte with the marker will characteristically block the ion pathway, yielding a conductance change that serves as a signature for target identification and quantification. This paper will present the design and synthesis of carrier DNA molecules with markers at tailored positions for detection of a few targeted nucleic acid sequences for a versatile approach of specific DNA measurement with nanopipettes. Their specificity and selectivity in detecting and differentiating the multiple target sequence in an aqueous solution is also determined.

K.FPI.8
18:30
Authors : K. Brassat, A. Keller, G. Grundmeier, W. Bremser, O. Strube, J. K. N. Lindner
Affiliations : Nanostructures, Nanoanalysis and Photonic materials, Department of Physics, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany; Center for Optoelectronics and Photonics Paderborn CeOPP, Paderborn, Germany; Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany; Biobased and Bioinspired Materials, Department of Chemistry, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany;

Resume : Site-selective deposition of biomolecules onto solid surfaces paves the way for the successful integration of biological systems into conventional devices. This site-selectivity can be obtained by surface prepatterning, which offers clearly defined binding sites. We use nanosphere lithography with self-assembled polymer particles as a versatile large-area surface patterning process. Hexagonally arranged monolayers of polymer spheres can be produced on numerous surfaces (SiO2, TiO2, mica, Au) and can act as shadow mask in a subsequent material (Au, Pt, SiO2) deposition process. We show that by controlled shrinking of polymer spheres in plasma processes prior to material deposition, the shape of the shadow mask can be tailored. After material deposition and mask removal antidot patterns are obtained, i.e. material thin films with hexagonally arranged circular free substrate areas. Thus, the antidot patterns exhibit a periodically varying material contrast that defines reactive and inert sites for a subsequent site-selective deposition of e.g. biological units. We present two examples which rely on the flexibility in the choice of materials. First, we show the site-selective immobilization of chymosin due to patterned platinum films on SiO2. The chymosin can then be used for the autodeposition of casein micelles. Secondly, patterned gold films on mica provide defined adsorption sites for DNA origami, which in turn can be used for molecular lithography.

K.FPI.9
18:30
Authors : Marzia Buscema [1], Sofiya Matviykiv [1], Hans Deyhle [1], Thomas Pfohl [1], Andreas Zumbuehl [2] and Bert Müller [1]
Affiliations : [1] Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, Gewerbestrasse 14, 4123 Allschwil, Switzerland; [2] Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland

Resume : Heart diseases are among the top causes of death worldwide: up to 50 % of people struck by heart attack die before arriving at the hospital. The blood flow in diseased human coronary arteries is significantly altered compared to the healthy situation. Therefore, one may use a purely physical trigger to overcome the systemic delivery of vasodilators such as a fall in the blood pressure. Here, we propose mechano-sensitive liposomes of nanometer size as containers [1]. In vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate their compatibility with the immune system both in human sera and pigs [2]. The properties of such containers have to be tuned to ensure the release of the payload preferentially at the constricted area. The mechanical properties of the mechano-sensitive liposomes are currently investigated using microfluidics combined with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS): the scattering signal through micro-channels containing the liposomes reveals information about deformation and/or rupture under selected shear stress values. To determine the shear stress threshold for release, the morphology of the diseased and healthy human arteries has to be investigated. Micro computed tomography (µCT) is a valid technique for the three-dimensional visualization of the human coronary artery morphology [3]. These tomography data are the ground for flow simulations providing the wall shear stress range between healthy and stenosed regions of blood vessels [4]. [1] M N Holme et al., Nature Nanotechnology 7; 536-43 (2012) [2] Bugna et al., Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine 12; 845-49(2016) [3] Buscema et al., Proceedings of SPIE 9967; 99670O (2016) [4] M N Holme et al., Nature Protocols 9, 14011415 (2014)

K.FPI.10
18:30
Authors : Fotini Pappa, V. Karagkiozaki1, M.Giannouli1, I. Moutsios2, S. Logothetidis1
Affiliations : 1.Nanomedicine Group, Lab for “Thin Films- Nanosystems & Nanometrology”, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece 2.Lab for “Thin Films- Nanosystems & Nanometrology”, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Resume : Cardiovascular diseases constitute a major public health concern in industrialized nations. Oxidative stress induced free radicals play a critical role in cellular processes implicated in atherosclerosis and many other heart diseases. Quercetin (Qu) is an antioxidant drug which is shown that effectively protects against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Encapsulation of drugs in polymeric NPs are widely used in producing sustained and controllable drug release, or to avoid degradation of non-released drugs. In this current work, a novel system of polymeric PLGA monodispersed NPs loaded with Qu, was fabricated via electrohydrodynamic atomization process (EHDA) in order to improve poor aqueous solubility and stability of the drug with the aim of preventing atherosclerosis. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed the fabrication of monodispersed spherical polymeric nanoparticles with diameter ranging from 100nm to 150nm, narrow size distribution and smooth surface. This measurement revealed also the presence of chitosan coating layer on the particles surface. The release profile of quercetin from the particles was investigated by determining the drug amount released at specific intervals for 1 month by luminescence. Furthermore, XRD analysis was used to determine the physical status of Qu encapsulated in NPs compared with that of pure Qu as well as the physical status of chitosan in the case of coated PLGA NPs. The information obtained from this study was further used in coronary patients in order to test in vivo the reduction of oxidative stress levels. Successfully it was facilitated that the design and fabrication of polymeric nanoparticles is a unique and possible delivery system for encapsulation, protection and controlled release of the flavonoid quercetin which is aiming to protect against CVDs. Acknowledgement: This work was partially supported by NanoReg II project, and the Nation Project NANOCARDIO

K.FPI.11
18:30
Authors : Joana M. Vasconcelos, Federico Zen, Daniela M. Angione, Ronan J. Cullen, Paula E. Colavita
Affiliations : School of Chemistry and Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland

Resume : When a biomaterial is exposed to biological fluids a series of events occur on their surface after implantation, starting with small biomolecule adsorption in the first seconds followed by cell adhesion after a few minutes. The ability to control the first layer of biomolecules adsorbing on the biomaterial surface is critical for preventing undesirable bioresponses such as thrombosis or infection. Proteins and lipids are an example of biomolecules that adsorb on the biomaterial surface after implantation. It is known that protein and lipid adsorption plays an important role as they regulate cell adhesion and receptor binding. Here we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between model lipid assemblies and carbon surfaces using a combination of spectroscopic and fluorescence methods. The adsorption of phosphatidylcholine (PC) / phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes onto amorphous carbon surfaces was investigated regarding buffer composition and surface chemistry. Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (IRRAS) measurements indicate PC/PS liposome adsorption on amorphous carbon (a-C) while oxidized amorphous carbon shows no adsorption when a monovalent ion solution was used as a buffer. When a dication was added as a counterion, the adsorption of PC/PS is seen for all a-C surfaces. AFM was performed in order to understand the type of adsorption on amorphous carbon surfaces. It was showed that PC/PS adsorb on a-C surfaces as a mono/bi layer of phospholipids depending on the surface chemistry and buffer composition. Finally ?-potential measurements on a-C surfaces gave insights about the electrostatic interactions between PC/PS liposomes and a-C surfaces.

K.FPI.12
 
POSTER SESSION. Cell & Tissue Nature Science, Bioengineering & Investigations : Chairs: Professors Grazia Maria Lucia Messina & Fabio Variola
18:40
Authors : Jimin Park, Yu-Chan Kim, Myoung-Ryul Ok
Affiliations : Center for Biomaterials, Korea Institute of Science & Technology, South Korea

Resume : Biochemical cues, such as oxygen molecules or growth factors, can regulate several cellular responses in human body. Therefore, controlling the local concentrations of biochemical cues near cells is essential for driving desired cellular responses. Interestingly, enzymes can sustainably regulate the release of biochemical cues without external stimuli. Inspired their unique characteristics, I designed enzyme-mimetic nanomaterials, which can spontaneously regulate the release of the biochemical cues near cells. First, inspired by biological oxygen-converting enzymes, I designed new nanocatalysts, which have chemical and material properties similar to those of the enzymes (J. Am. Chem. Soc, 136, 4201 (2014)). Second, to mimic the function of biological energy sources that drive enzymatic reactions, I designed biodegradable materials, which can generate free electrons (energy) via degradation. Finally, by combining enzyme-mimetic catalysts with biodegradable metals, biochemical cues, such as H2O2, can be spontaneously generated without external stimuli (Angew.Chem, 49, 14753 (2015)). I found that spontaneously formed H2O2 can promote several physiological processes, such as in-vitro angiogenesis. Finally, I demonstrated their application feasibilities towards biomedical devices, such as orthopedic implants and cardiovascular stents. We envision that our enzyme-mimetic approach could be extended to triggering other cellular responses.

K.PI.1
18:40
Authors : Marek Pokorny, Jan Klemes, Ondrej Zidek, Camille Dollinger, Vladimir Velebny, Nihal Engin Vrana
Affiliations : Marek Pokorny; Jan Klemes; Ondrej Zidek; Vladimir Velebny: Contipro a.s., Dolni Dobrouc 401, 561 02, Czech Republic Camille Dollinger; Nihal Engin Vrana: PROTIP MEDICAL, 8 Place de l’Hôpital, F-67000 Strasbourg, France Nihal Engin Vrana: INSERMUMR1121, 11 rue Humann, F-67085 Strasbourg, France

Resume : Surface topography of implants has a significant influence on their integration with the host tissue. The ability to modify the surface features of implants in a personalized manner can significantly improve the rate of success of metallic implants. For this end, we developed a direct write printing method (a revised version of electrohydrodynamic printing which is a single step process) to modify titanium implant surfaces with biocompatible polymers with microscale precision. The deposition of ordered strips of photocrosslinkable, cell adhesive polymeric composites with 20 μm spacing onto medical grade titanium substrates was achieved. Optimization of voltage, feeding rate and collection speed resulted in regular structures via very rapid movement of the grounded rotating collector driven to equivalent of the linear surface speed of above 100cm/s. Prior surface modification of titanium via acid etching our UV activation improved the stability of the printed structures.Polymeric lines induced temporary orientation of human monocytes and induced a thicker cell multilayer formation by fibroblasts (p<0.05). On patterned surfaces monocytes secreted higher amounts of anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to TCPS control which demonstrated the possibility to alter cell behaviour in a desired direction via added topographies (p<0.05). Electrohydrodynamic printing can be used to add cell adhesive patterned structures on implant surface to control their initial interaction with immune cells which has a strong effect on the integration of the implant.

K.PI.2
18:40
Authors : Vdovenkova T.A.
Affiliations : Douglas Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada tvdovenk@connect.carleton.ca

Resume : Study of circadian rhythms of brain activity allows to change perception, memory and treat some emotional disorders by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to PFC and to subcortical pathways of action potentials (a. p.), which leads to synaptic receptor redistribution along neuronal membrane. Consecutive simulation of nonREM IIIrd and IInd stage waves by TMS due to oscillation of electric charge with frequency about 1 Hz (δ-TMS) along Shaffer collaterals and about 8 Hz (σ-TMS) along direct monosynaptic intrahippocampal pathway, respectively, leads not only to distortion of episode or space perception, but also to shortening formation period for long term and top-down memory, strengthening memory synapses and hippocampal influence on SANS. Consecutive simulation of nonREM IIIrd and IVth stage waves by δ-TMS along neurites between VPM and DMNT, along mtt and by σ-TMS near PFC, respectively, leads not only to distortion of expression of emotions, to mixture of perceived and own associations, but also to shortening formation period for lasting long term memory and strengthening this memory synapses. Travelling of a. p. from right mFC(ACG) to hippocampi and PPC starts memory recall. Therefore, consecutive simulation of nonREM IIIrd and IVth stage waves by δ-TMS along right ic, right mtt, between right VPM and DMNT and by σ-TMS near PFC, respectively, facilitates generation of β a. p. in left hippocampus during long term memory retrieval. Simulation of nonREM IIIrd stage waves by δ-TMS along left mtt and subsequent β a. p. along direct hippocampal - anterior thalamic nuclei pathway during memory recall strengthen synapses from AM neurons, transferring β a. p., to AM neurons, transferring the sum of θ a. p. to PFC. This allows to retrieve perceived and own associations connected with activated in left hippocampus β a. p. Consecutive simulation of nonREM IIIrd and IVth stage waves by δ-TMS along hippocampal connections with left LHN and by σ-TMS near PFC/vPFC, respectively, increases frequency of a. p. traveling from right mFC/left vPFC to left LHN through left Co/BL amygdala. This strengthens synapses between amygdala and LHN and activates PANS, decreasing internal perception of fear / aggression and anger. The same consecutive simulation in contralateral hemisphere decreases internal perception of mania / depression and regret. Simulation of nonREM IIIrd stage waves by δ-TMS between VPM and DMNT with subsequent, caused by sound perception, β a. p. leads not only to distortion of emotional perception, but also may cause apoptosis of DMNT neurons in circuits of motor cortex and, therefore, inhibits expression of emotions. TMS induced L-LTP with excessive PRP synthesis causes apoptosis and can erase long term memory or excessively activate SANS, erase lasting long term memory, procedural memory and increase anxiety. Pharmacological hyperpolarization of neurons under sleep promoting medication decreases IEG activation, PRP synthesis, L-LTP, apoptosis, preserving excessive SANS activation. More intensive pharmacological hyperpolarization under anesthesia decreases Ca2+ influx into neurons so, that LTD replaces LTP, creating silent synapses.

K.PI.3
18:40
Authors : Catherine Philippart, Karine Glinel
Affiliations : Institute of Condensed Matter & Nanosciences (Bio & Soft Matter), Université catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 1, box L7.04.02, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Resume : The integration of implanted materials in the body is a promising approach in the field of tissue engineering. Up to now, this integration presents a great challenge which consists in triggering a specific cellular behavior while preventing infection outbreak. To meet this challenge, we produced chemically patterned surfaces which induce distinct responses from bacteria and mammalian cells. These patterns are composed of nanometer-width polymer brush grafted with peptides targeting specifically bacteria or mammalian cells. Two peptides were used to modify the polymer brush: a cell-adhesive peptide (RGD) and/or a biocompatible bactericidal peptide (LL37). Moreover the geometry of the pattern such as the width or the spacing of the patterned lines was varied. The behavior of Escherichia coli and Stem Cells of the Apical Papilla (SCAPs) were studied on these surfaces. It was shown that LL37 and RGD peptides, individually grafted or grafted as a mixture on the pattern, keep their bactericidal and bioadhesive properties towards E. coli and SCAPs, respectively. Moreover, the patterned surfaces modified by RGD peptide or a mixture of RGD and LL37 peptides, induce a clear orientation and a modification of the aspect ratio of SCAPs, according to the pattern direction. These results evidence the potential utility of the peptide-modified nanopatterned surfaces to control the behavior of both bacterial and mammalian cells for potential applications in regenerative medicine.

K.PI.4
18:40
Authors : Ang Gao1, Penghui Li2, Liping Tong2, Huaiyu Wang2, Paul K. Chu1
Affiliations : 1 Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong, PR China 2 Institute of Biomedicine & Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong, PR China

Resume : Small diameter vascular grafts made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) suffer from the poor patency rate because of the thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, which are result from the lack of endothelialization and chronic inflammation. Therefore, grafts with reduced thrombogenicity, rapid endothelialization as well as the immunomodulating ability are highly desirable. In this work, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was used to modify the surface of PTFE to meet these needs. After nitrogen (N2) PIII treatment, PTFE surface becomes cytocompatible that is sufficient for endothelialization. More importantly, a free radical reservoir is generated underneath the surface. These free radicals continuously migrate to the surface and react with the environment. Taking advantage of this special mechanism, various functional biomolecules can be covalently immobilized on the surface of PTFE by simply incubating the modified samples in corresponding solutions. Heparin, SDF-1α, as well as the CD47 are shown to be successfully bound to the surface with their bioactivities well reserved. The resultant surface possesses the multifunctional properties of reduced thrombogenicity, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) recruitment potential, and the anti-inflammatory ability. Therefore, this functionalized surface is promising in facilitating the rapid in-situ endothelialization and favorable host immune response that finally contribute to the superior long-term patency.

K.PI.5
18:40
Authors : C. Ribeiroa,b, S. Ribeiroa, D. M. Correiaa, R.J. Pereiraa, P. Martinsa and S. Lanceros-Mendeza,c,d
Affiliations : aDepartamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal bCenter of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Braga 4710-057 Portugal cBCMaterials, Parque Científico y Tecnológico de Bizkaia, 48160-Derio, Spain. dIKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Spain.

Resume : Tissue engineering (TE) is an interdisciplinary field related with the development of functional substitutes for lost or damaged tissues[1]. In particular, bone TE is extremely promising once socioeconomic consequences in treating the patients with bone injuries is a major concern and will increase in the next years due the ageing of the population[2]. An adequate bone treatment addressing biomimetic conditions is yet to be found and it is at the same time urgently needed for full recovery of the patients[3]. Aiming to address such biomimetic conditions, such as the presence of piezoelectricity in the bone structure, piezoelectric polymers have already proven their suitability in the bone-regeneration mechanism, nevertheless, in some cases, the patient is immobilized due to bone fracture, and as a result the natural mechanical stimulus during walking does not occur naturally. Trying to overcome such limitation, this work[2] shows that magnetoelectric (ME) Terfenol-D/poly(vinylidene fluoride) and ferrite/silk composites are able to provide mechanical/electrical stimuli to pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1 ) and that those stimuli can be remotely triggered by a magnetic field. It was found that cell proliferation was improved up to ≈25% when cells were cultured underneath mechanical (110 ppm strain) and electrical stimulation (0.115 mV voltage), revealing that ME cell stimulation is a novel and suitable approach for TE once it allows magnetic, mechanical and electrical stimuli[4]. Acknowledgements The authors thank the FCT- Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia- for financial support in the framework of the Strategic Funding UID/FIS/04650/2013 and under project PTDC/EEI-SII/5582/2014. P.M., C.R. and S.R. acknowledges also support from FCT (SFRH/BPD/96227/2013, SFRH/BPD/90870/2012 and SFRH/BD/111478/2015 grants respectively). Financial support from the Basque Government Industry Department under the ELKARTEK Program is also acknowledged as well as funding by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) through the project MAT2016-76039-C4-3-R (AEI/FEDER, UE) (including the FEDER financial support). REFERENCES [1] S. Gil, and J. F. Mano, “Magnetic composite biomaterials for tissue engineering,” Biomaterials Science, vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 812-818, 2014. [2] C. Ribeiro, V. Correia, P. Martins, F. M. Gama, and S. Lanceros-Mendez, “Proving the suitability of magnetoelectric stimuli for tissue engineering applications,” Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, vol. 140, pp. 430-436, 2016. [3] A. J. Salgado, O. P. Coutinho, and R. L. Reis, “Bone tissue engineering: State of the art and future trends,” Macromolecular Bioscience, vol. 4, no. 8, pp. 743-765, 2004. [4] P. Martins, and S. Lanceros-Méndez, “Polymer-Based Magnetoelectric Materials,” Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 23, no. 27, pp. 3371-3385, March, 2013.

K.PI.6
18:40
Authors : L.N. Dumitrescu1,2, P. Neacsu3, I. Tirca1,2, A. Bonciu1,4, V. Marascu1, V. Dinca1, A. Cimpean3 and M. Dinescu1
Affiliations : 1National Institute for Laser and Radiation, Bucharest, Magurele, Romania. 2University of Craiova, Faculty of Sciences, Craiova, Romania. 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania 4University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Bucharest, Romania

Resume : Polymeric biomaterials are of interest for wide range of applications, from biomedical science (membranes, sensors, biosensors) to functional smart coatings in tissue engineering applications. Among these polymers, based on its piezoelectric properties, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) gained interest as external mechanical stimuli responsive biomaterial for bone tissue engineering application. In this work, we report biocompatibility results correlated with deposition parameters of PVDF layers grown by matrix assisted by pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The coatings were deposited from a frozen target with concentration 5% of material in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) matrix solvent. After deposition, the coatings were subjected to a thermal treatment and investigated before and after treatment. Properties like morphology, optical, chemical structure, structural and optical properties, were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), spectro-ellipsometry (SE), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X ray diffraction (XRD). In vitro studies with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts indicated good biocompatibility, while the thermal treatment of the coatings did not significantly alter the cell adhesion, viability and proliferation potential. The physico-chemical characteristics of the deposited thin films along with the positive in vitro osteoblast response demonstrate that MAPLE is an adequate method for obtaining PVDF thin films for future bio-applications.

K.PI.7
18:40
Authors : L. Rusen1, V. Dinca1*, L.E. Sima2, I. Anghel1, A. Bonciu1,3, M. Dinescu1, and P. Hoffmann4
Affiliations : 1 NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, Zip RO-077125, Tel. 00402145744142, Magurele, Bucharest, Romania 2Institute of Biochemistry of the Romanian Academy, Bucharest, Romania 3University of Bucharest – Faculty of Physics, Bucharest, Romania

Resume : Manipulating the guidance of cellular adhesion and migration for the formation of various cellular networks in vitro is of high interest both in medical basic research as well as for biotechnological applications. By defining the design and the direction of cellular outgrowth and connectivity on artificial surfaces it offers potential application in the design of prostheses and implants or in creation of novel biosensors or microfluidic devices. In this work, our approach for selective surface modification at micrometer-scale was based on excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of different materials (polymers, ceramics). Laser-based method for surface modification is a promising alternative as it can be automated and is reproducible, does not generate contamination and, moreover, it can confer a variety of nano- and microstructures with increased roughness and stable characteristics for long-term bio-interaction assays. Direct writing and/or texturing of materials represent two different approaches used to create 2D and 3D topographical features as physical guidance structures. This work will provide information about how biointerfaces can influence cell fate, with the accent on the ability of human mesenchymal stem cells to orient and produce organized cellular arrangements on the microstructured patterns. The characteristics of the topographical patterns were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and the in vitro preliminary response of the cells included Fluorescence Microscopy analysis and SEM. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results has received funding from the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research (CNCS – UEFISCDI), under the projects PN-II-PT-PCCA-2013-4-1643, PNII- PT-PCCA-2013-4-199, PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2434, and Nucleus program - contract 4N/2016.

K.PI.8
18:40
Authors : M. Muñoz Hernando (1), I. E. Dunlop (2), D. T. Dexter (3) and A. E. Porter (2)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, SW72AZ, London, UK (2) Department of Materials, Imperial College London, SW72AZ, London, UK (3) Parkinson’s Disease Research Group, Centre for Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration, Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London W12 0NN, UK

Resume : Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease. It affects approximately seven million people globally. Impaired motor function is classically used to make a clinical diagnosis of PD. However, it has been recently recognized as a more complex illness comprising both motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS), which may precede the onset of motor symptoms by years. Some of these symptoms are believed to be attributable to misfolded protein aggregates in the brain. Therefore, the ability to image these aggregates in living patients would offer much earlier diagnosis, with the potential for earlier treatment and improved patient outcomes. For these reasons, this investigation will focus on developing biofunctional nanoparticles capable of targeting the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson’s, as part of an on-going effort to develop nanoparticle contrast agents for medical imaging of the disease. For this purpose, gold nanoparticles functionalized, by means of “click-chemistry”, with antibodies that are able to target the characteristic protein aggregates will be synthesized, characterized and assessed. Keywords: misfolded proteins; biofunctional nanoparticles; contrast agent; click-chemistry

K.PI.9
18:40
Authors : Eun-chae Jeon, PilJung Kim, Nari Kang, Ju-Young Kim, Ji-Young Jeong, Seung Hwan Moon, Tae-Jin Je
Affiliations : Department of Nanomanufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 34103 Daejeon, Korea; School of Materials Science and Engineering, UNIST, 44919 Ulsan, Korea

Resume : Many people hate to wear metal braces for straightening their teeth because the braces are easily recognized by other people. A clear aligner similar to a mouth guard is recently highlighted for straightening teeth in dental clinics replacing the metal brace. Since this is made of a transparent bio-compatible polymer, it is almost invisible. The clear aligner is manufactured by thermal mechanical molding process from a thin sheet, which can change the mechanical properties due to heat and plastic deformation. Especially, accurate characterization of variation of the elastic modulus which determines orthodontic force of the clear aligner is important for accurately straightening teeth. However, to apply conventional characterization method such as tensile test is impossible because the clear aligner has curved surfaces and is much thin. We applied nanoindentation technique to characterize the variation of the elastic modulus in this study. Since this technique pushes the specimen about one micrometer, the curved and thin clear aligner could be characterized. The sheets were deformed thermally and mechanically to have different thicknesses because a clear aligner having less thickness could be assumed more deformed from the sheet. The measured elastic moduli were dependent on the final thickness, which means the real orthodontic force is different from the conventionally calculated orthodontic force from the elastic modulus of the undeformed polymer sheet.

K.PI.10
18:40
Authors : Sung Ho Yang
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry and Chemisty Education, Korea National University of Education

Resume : Biological systems have ways to preserve genetic information and protect cellular components against external stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, desiccation, high temperatures, radiation, and caustic chemicals. The preservation is mainly achieved by the physicochemical robustness of the outer organic shells. It has, however, been practically difficult to achieve biochemical compatibility of living cells with robust artificial shells, as the synthesis of robust materials generally requires harsh conditions that interfere with the viability of the cells. In this respect, the essential step for the formation of strong artificial shells is to develop bio- and cytocompatible materials and synthesis reactions. Over the past decade, researchers have attempted to ‘coat’ living cells with bio-inspired materials such as silica, titania (TiO2), calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, polydopamine, etc., and the mechanical rigidity and cytoprotectability of the shells have been demonstrated.[1] This presentation focuses on chemical approaches to single-cell encapsulation with artificial shells, including biomineralization and mussel-inspired polymerization. Various approaches to shell formation are reviewed herein, including a review of the properties of the formed nanometric shell. [1] W. K. Cho, S. H. Yang, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2015, 4481. J. Y. Kim, B. S. Lee, J. Choi, B. J. Kim, J. Y. Choi, S. M. Kang, S. H. Yang, I. S. Choi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, 55, 15306. S. H. Yang, J. Choi, L. Palanikumar, E. S. Choi, J. Lee, J. Kim, I. S. Choi, J.-H. Ryu, Chem. Sci. 2015, 6, 4698. J. Lee, J. Choi, J. H. Park, M.-H. Kim, D. Hong, H. Cho, S. H. Yang, I. S. Choi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 8056. S. H. Yang, D. Hong, J. Lee, E. H. Ko, I. S. Choi, Small 2013, 9, 178. S. H. Yang, E. H. Ko, Y. H. Jung, I. S. Choi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 6115. S. H. Yang, K.-B. Lee, B. Kong, J.-H. Kim, H.-S. Kim, I. S. Choi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2009, 48, 9160. S H. Yang, S. M. Kang, K.-B. Lee, T. D. Chung, H. Lee, I. S. Choi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 2795.

K.PI.11
18:40
Authors : Yoshikatsu AKIYAMA, Kazuhiro FUKUMORI, Masayuki YAMATO and Teruo OKANO
Affiliations : Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Resume : We developed a new facile method for the preparation of temperature-responsive cell culture surfaces (TRCS) by photo-polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide using a surface-immobilized photo initiator. In the first step, thioxanthone groups, which served as the photo initiator, were directly formed on polystyrene culture dish surfaces (TX-PSt). Second, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) was grafted onto the TX-PSt surfaces (PIPAAm-TX-PSt) by using the visible light or light-emitting diode irradiation-induced surface Initiated polymerization method. By optimizing the amount of grafted PIPAAm, the resulting PIPAAm-TX-PSt successfully exhibited characteristics of a TRCS. In addition, a striped micropatterned polyacrylamide area was successively formed on the photo-irradiated PIPAAm-TX-PSt surface by using a chromium photomask. These results show that temperature-responsive cell culture surfaces can be prepared through this new method.[1] REFERENCES. [1] Fukumori K., Akiyama Y., Yamato M., Okano T., ChemNanoBio, 2016, 5, 454-460.

K.PI.12
18:40
Authors : Maria Rita Correro
Affiliations : University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland

Resume : Enzymes are proteins able to catalyze a large number of chemical reactions with outstanding selectivity and efficiency. Having being exposed to selective pressures, enzymes have evolved to efficiently work in their “physiological” environment. However, the capacity of enzymes to catalyze reactions in non-physiological conditions, such as in industrial processes, is strongly limited by their fragility. To overcome the gap left open by natural evolution, strategies of enzymes resistance enhancement such as protection and structural modification have been developed. In the presentation will be presented a novel method to produce hybrid organic/inorganic nanobiocatalysts with enhanced resistance to a variety of stress conditions. The chemical strategy is based on the self-sorting and poly-condensation of organosilane building blocks at the surface of enzymes anchored onto silica nanoparticles, in order to grow an organosilica shell of controlled thickness. It will be demonstrated that the sorting of organosilanes on the available area depends, not only on the chemical functionality of the building blocks but also on the chemical complementarity with the amino acid residues exposed at the surface of the enzyme. We have demonstrated that, being the protective shell soft, it allows the enzyme to maintain a sufficient conformational mobility and catalytic activity. Moreover, we have shown that the protective shell provides the enzyme with a remarkable stability against stresses of different nature such as pH, heat, chaotropic agents, ultrasound and proteases.

K.PI.13
18:40
Authors : Masaru Tanaka1,2, Shingo Kobayashi1,2, Takashi Hoshiba 2, Kazuki Fukushima2, Fumihiro Aratsu1, Daiki Murakami1
Affiliations : 1Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University. 2Frontier Center for Organic Materials, Yamagata University. masaru_tanaka@ms.ifoc.kyushu-u.ac.jp tanaka@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp http://www.soft-material.jp/ http://www.bio-material.jp/

Resume : When the biomaterials come into contact with biological fluids, water immediately adsorb onto the surface of the materials. This is followed by protein adsorption, denaturation of the adsorbed proteins, and finally cell adhesions. We have proposed the concept of “Intermediate Water” as the major factor determining protein adsorptions and cell adhesions. Here, we present various synthetic strategies for the preparation of the biomaterials, which include characteristic properties of biomaterials. We highlight recent developments in the use of biomaterials for medical devices, and provides an overview of the progress made in the design of biomaterials by controlling the interfacial water structure through precision polymer synthesis. References 1) M. Tanaka, et al, Polym. J., 47, 114-121 (2015) 2) Langmuir, 30, 10698-10703 (2014) 3) Adv. Healthcare Mater., 3, 775-784 (2014) 4) Nanomedicine, 10, 313-319 (2014) 5) Langmuir, 31, 3661-3667 (2015) 6) PLoS One,10, e0136066 (2015) 7) Langmuir, 7100-7105 (2015) 8) Macromol. Biosci., 1296-1303 (2015) 9) ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 7, 18096-18103 (2015) 10) J. Mater.Chemi. B, 3, 8224-8249 (2015) 11) Macromolecules, 49, 2493-2501 (2016) 12) Colloids Surf. B,145, 586-596 (2016) 13) J. Bioact. Compat. Polym, 31, 361-372 (2016) 14) PLoS One, 11, e01582898 (2016) 15) RSC Advances, 6, 89103-89112 (2016) 16) ACS Bimater. Sci. Eng, 2, 2122–2126 (2016) 17) Biomacromolecules, 17,3808-3815 (2016) 18) Macromolecules, 49, 8154-8161 (2016)

K.PI.14
18:40
Authors : Anthi RANELLA1 co-authors: Sirago Spanou, 1,2 Chara Simitzi, 1 Despoina Aggelaki, 1,3 Evi Kavatzikidou, 1 Kanelina Karali, 1 Costas Fotakis 1,3 and Emmanuel Stratakis 1,4
Affiliations : 1 Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Heraklion, 71003, Greece 2Biology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, 71003, Greece 3Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, 71003, Greece 4Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, 71003, Greece

Resume : The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides mechanical stimuli additional and/or distinct to the chemical ones, at the micro and nano-scale, for the cells phenotype maintenance (adhesion, orientation, proliferation and differentiation). Unlike other tissue types, the nervous tissue spans in a complex multilayer environment whose topographical features display a large spectrum of morphologies and size scales. Thus, the study of the effect of various topographical cues on cellular morphology, proliferation and differentiation is required to answer fundamental questions concerning the neural tissue regeneration. Herein, we present laser based micro- and nano-fabrication techniques for the development of new types of cell culture platforms, where the effect of various topographical cues on neuronal cell response can be evaluated. [1-2] The in vitro cytocompatibility behavior of these structures was investigated using neuronal cell lines, primary neuronal cells, and embryonic cortical stem cells at different time points. The key point of this study is the investigation of the topography induced mechanisms related to specific neuronal cell processes. Our results indicate a method to tune the cellular adhesion, orientation and proliferation by selecting the topography of the underlying substrates. More importantly, this topography-induced effect on cellular response enables the realization of arbitrary cell patterns, on demand, onto a single culture substrate. In all, the aforementioned ability of the substrates to control the differentiation process and the neural network morphology could be useful for the fabrication of specific cell platforms that can potentially be used as neural implants in the field of regenerative medicine.

K.PI.15
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II. Smart Stimuli Responsive Nanomaterials: from designed synthesized to biological & biomimetics.The special Session & Young Investigator Forum are dedicated to the 2016 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry Professors : Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J.Fraser Stoddart, Bernard L. Feringa “for the design and synthesis of molecular mashines”. Keynote Presentations Session. Chairs: Dr. D.Iandolo & Professors G.Marletta, H. Fenniri , Yury Gogotsi & Dr. Em.Gatto
08:50
Authors : Paul Siffert
Affiliations : E-MRS Headquarters, BP.20, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, France www.european-mrs.com

Resume : After three years of exile in Lille because of the renovation and extension of the Congress Center we are happy to be back home in Strasbourg and even more because we have an exceptional local speaker : Jean Pierre Sauvage a Nobel Laureate in Chemistry from Strasbourg. The University of Strasbourg is by far not the largest with >50,000 students but it can claim the surprising number of 4 Nobel laureates. Strasbourg is a really open international city, and the high level of E-MRS conferences can be judged by them being honoured by having had around 15 Nobel Laureates as speakers Jean Pierre SAUVAGE started his research activities here under the leadership of J.M. LEHN, the 1987 Nobel in Chemistry in 1971and joined CNRS in the same year. He spent 1973-74 in Oxford and was nominated as Research Director at CNRS in 1979 where he was awarded the Silver Medal of CNRS in 1988. RESEARCH BREAKTHROUGHS Even though it was predicted by Richard Feynman that nano machines will be developed as early as 1950, the first significative steps towards a molecular machine were achieved only around 1983 when J.P. Sauvage invented a CHEMICAL METHODOLOGY combining two molecules linked by strong covalence bonds, in which the atoms share the electrons incommon. These two molecules have to be interlaced and mobile one with respect to the other. Sauvage was able to develop a reproducible technique with a decade better efficiency the those previously found. I remember in an interview in the French Journal, La Recherche, he said around 10 years ago that everything is still very fundamental and that there is a long way to go . But, some researchers are quite innovative and 2000 saw the first engine! In newspapers reports in 2016 the structure of such a molecular “muscle”, a series of pictures were published with 3 antic symboles, going back to different philosophies here is my open question: Did the 3 Nobel Laureates discover something new, or was already everything known at that time? However, J.P. Sauvage will explain it to you in detail . Prof Sauvage we are highly honoured that you have found the time to be here today, despite the pressures that you are currently under and we are looking forward to hearing you now.

K.II.1
09:00
Authors : Prof. Jean-Pierre Sauvage
Affiliations : Institut de Science et d’ingénierie Supramoléculaire de l'Université de Strasbourg. 8 allée Gaspard Monge, BP70028, 67083 STRASBOURG Cedex, France

Resume : The area named "Chemical Topology" is mostly concerned with molecules whose molecular graph is non planar, i.e. which can not be represented in a plane without crossing points. The most important family of such compounds is that of catenanes. The simplest catenane, a [2]catenane, consists of two interlocking rings. Rotaxanes consist of rings threaded by acyclic fragments (axes). The simplest rotaxane, a [2]rotaxane, contains two non-covalently connected components : a ring and an axis, the axis being end-functionalised by bulky groups preventing unthreading of the non cyclic fragment from the cycle. Interlocking ring compounds have attracted much interest in the molecular sciences, first as pure synthetic challenges and, more recently, as components of functional materials. In recent years, spectacular progress has been made. Highly functional and complex systems have been reported by several research teams, demonstrating the power of modern synthetic tools based on "template effects". Separately, the field of artificial molecular machines has experienced a spectacular development, in relation to molecular devices at the nanometric level or mimics of biological motors. In biology, motor proteins are of the utmost importance in a large variety of processes essential to life (ATPase, a rotary motor, or the myosin-actin complex of striated muscles behaving as a linear motor responsible for contraction or elongation). A few recent examples are based on simple or more complex rotaxanes or catenanes molecular machines. Particularly significant examples include "molecular shuttles" as well as multi-rotaxanes reminiscent of muscles or able to act as switchable receptors. The molecules are set in motion using electrochemical, photonic or chemical signals. Examples will be given which cover the various approaches used for triggering the molecular motions implied in various synthetic molecular machine prototypes. Finally, potential applications of molecular machines will be discussed.

K.II.2
09:40
Authors : Prof. Hicham Fenniri
Affiliations : Northeastern University, 313 Snell Engineering Center, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, USA.

Resume : In this talk we will introduce the Rosette Nanotubes (RNTs) as a safe, tunable, and effective nanocarrier that can efficiently deliver a therapeutic RNA payload to a target cell. RNTs are biologically inspired nanomaterials created through the self-assembly of a DNA base analog (G/\C), exhibiting tunable chemical and physical properties. A defining characteristic and strength of the RNTs as a drug delivery vehicle is the ability to display various functional groups on their surface via self-assembly, conferring to them tunable physical (stability, dimensions), chemical (surface charge and channel properties), and biological (targeting peptides, bioactive molecules) properties. Such exquisite level of control allows to rationally design delivery systems that (a) evade the immune system, (b) encapsulate drugs, (c) actively or passively cross cellular membrane, (d) display bioactive drugs and exert a biological function, (e) display radioactive or photoactive probes to track and kill cancer cells, (f) escape the endosome when functionalized with positively charged amino acids and peptides, and (g) disassemble into innocuous small molecules after delivering their payload. Our multi-modal delivery system uses a multi-pronged approach to penetrate the target tissue and deliver therapeutic agents, all with one self-assembled biocompatible nanomaterial construct.

K.II.3
10:00 Coffee Break. General Photo    
10:30
Authors : Prof. Paolo Samorì
Affiliations : ISIS, Université de Strasbourg & CNRS, 8 allée Gaspard Monge, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

Resume : Supramolecularly engineered hybrid materials containing graphene are key multifunctional systems for applications in (opto)electronics and energy. The tuning of their dynamic physical and chemical properties can be achieved via tailored covalent or non-covalent interactions with ad-hoc macromolecules.[1] My lecture will review our recent findings on: (i) The harnessing of the yield of exfoliation of graphene in liquid media by mastering the supramolecular approach via the combination with suitably designed functional molecules possessing high affinity for the graphene surface, leading ultimately to the bottom-up formation of optically responsive graphene based nanocomposites for electronics. [2] (ii) The tuning of the graphene properties by combining them with organic semiconductors as a strategy to exploit the tunable ionization energy of thermally annealed liquid phase exfoliated graphene to modulate the transport regime as well as to fabricate new memory devices.[3] (iii) The bottom-up formation of graphene based 3D covalent frameworks with tunable intersheet distance, exhibiting large specific surface areas which determine extremely high performance in supercapacitors.[4] Our approaches provide a glimpse on the chemist?s toolbox to generate multifunctional graphene based nanocomposites with ad-hoc properties to address societal needs in electronics and energy applications. References: [1] (a) Chem. Soc. Rev. 2014, 43, 381?398 (b) Adv. Mater., 2016, 28, 6030?6051. [2] (a) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 10355?10361 (b) Small 2015, 11, 1691-1702. (c) Nat. Commun. 2016, 7, 11090. (d) Nat. Commun. 2016, 7, 11118. [3] (a) Adv. Mater. 2014, 26, 4814-4819. (b) ACS Nano, 2015, 9, 2357?2367. [4] Small 2016, 12, 1044-1052.

K.II.4
10:50
Authors : Dr. Mykola Seredych, Prof. Yuri Gogotsi
Affiliations : Department of Material Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute

Resume : Development of carbon-based materials to remove extracorporeally anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-8, and IL-6 from the circulatory blood stream is a challengeIn direct hemoperfusion techniques, it is important that the carbon-based adsorbents do not cause blood coagulation, hemolysis, platelet destruction and release of microparticles [1]. Despite generally good biocompatibility and adsorption properties, some limitations of carbon include lack of pore size control. It has been shown that the control of pore size with a large volume of slit-shaped mesopores (specifically in carbide-derived carbons) is a key factor to achieving efficient removal of proteins [2,3]. So the question arises: How does one match the pore size to a specific molecular size of proteins? This cannot be done based only on the porous texture, such as a high surface area and a large volume of mesopores. Apparently, the properties that control this adsorption process include the charge of proteins, van der Waals interactions, and hydrophobic interactions between adsorbent-adsorbate, in addition to a large and accessible surface area. The effects of protein-surface interaction on protein adsorption are complex due to a large number of contributions to the overall interaction. To better understand the protein-surface interactions, we used expanded graphite and graphene nanoplatelets as prospective biomedical materials for hemoperfusion. 1. Y. Fuchigami, T. Nakashima. U.S. Patent 4,248,736; 1981. 2. S. Yachamanei, G. Yushin, S.H. Yeon, Y. Gogotsi, C. Howell, S. Sandeman, G. Phillips, S. Mikhalovsky. Biomaterials 2010, 31, 4789-4794. 3. V. Presser, S.-H. Yeon, C. Vakifahmetoglu, C. A. Howell, S. R. Sandeman, P. Colombo, S. Mikhalovsky, Y. Gogotsi. Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2012, 1, 796-800.

K.II.5
11:10
Authors : Prof. Richard B. Jackman
Affiliations : London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (UCL), 17-19 Gordon Street, London , WC1H 0AH, UK

Resume : Diamond has ‘come of age’ as a material for technology and life science applications. Despite its reputation as a gemstone, high grade single crystal diamond can be grown in the laboratory at modest cost. Other forms of diamond, such as microcrystalline and nanocrystaline films can also be prepared, as can particulate nanodiamonds (typically ~5nm in size). Boron doping can mean that the normally highly electrical resistive material can be changed into both an n-type semiconductor and a quasi-metal. Diamond in its single crystal and polished polycrystalline forms has been shown to be ‘bio-inert’ when it comes to hippocampal neuronal cell attachment. For example, in a study some time ago, we showed that a patterned ECM protein tracks on diamond surfaces could be used to ‘steer’ the subsequent outgrowth of attached neurons into functioning, well defined, networks, given the inert nature of the diamond surface [1]. This position changes dramatically when nanostructured diamond is used, and most notably when surfaces are coated with nanodiamonds (NDs). In such a case we have shown that the NDs promoted adhesion of effective outgrowth without the purposeful addition of ECM proteins, and fully adherent functioning networks could be formed through this approach [3]. More recently, we have shown that nanostructured boron-doped diamond is suited to the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells, with no apparent toxic effects [4]. Diamond surfaces can also be chemically functionalized; we have shjpown that human neural stem cell differentiation can be influenced by this process [5]. This paper will briefly discuss the nature and properties of nanodiamonds, and then review the work performed at UCL on the interaction of nanodiamond films and nanodiamonds with neurons. 1. Ordered growth of neurons on diamond Specht CG, Williams OA, Jackman RB, Schoepfer R Biomaterials 26 (2005), 828-828 2. Thalhammer A., Edgington R.J., Cingolani L.A., Schoepfer R., Jackman,R.B. The use of nanodiamond monolayer coatings to promote the formation of functional neuronal networks Biomaterials 31, (2010) 2097-2104 3. Patterned neuronal networks using nanodiamonds and the effect of varying nanodiamond properties on neuronal adhesion and outgrowth Edgington R, Thalhammer A, Welch J, Bongrain A, Bergonzo P, Scorsone E, Schoepfer R and Jackman RB Journal of Neural Engineering, 10 (2013), 056022 4. Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells Alice C. Taylor, Barbora Vagaska, Robert Edgington, Clément Hébert, Patrizia Ferretti, Philippe Bergonzo and Richard B. Jackman Journal of Neural Engineering, 12 (2015), 066016 5. Surface functionalisation of nanodiamonds for human neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation Alice C Taylor, Citlali Helenes González, Benjamin Miller, Robert J. Edgington, Patrizia Ferretti, Richard B Jackman Scientific Reports (Submitted).

K.II.6
11:30
Authors : Dr. Emanuela Gatto
Affiliations : University of Rome Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome, Italy

Resume : In this talk I will introduce the problem of manipulating and controlling things on a nanometric scale. The self-assembly ability of molecules is of fundamental importance in modern science and technology, making possible to produce creative nanostructures with a precision that is not achievable with classical lithographic miniaturization techniques. The molecular self-assembly process is driven by different non-covalent and reversible interactions, which may be tailored in order modulate the final architectonic of the supramolecular structure obtained.[1] The most fascinating examples of supramolecular systems comes from Nature: by molecular organization, biological systems reached the level of sophistication which made possible to support life. One of the main components of biological systems are amino-acids, which are used as building blocks for the construction of proteins. A number of non-covalent interactions, among them the aggregation of helical segments into a more specific spatial conformation, drives the system into a specific three dimensional structure, which makes proteins the molecular motors par excellence. Imitating Nature, via helical peptide self-assembly on surface, it is possible to obtain films with tunable physical (patterning, molecular packing), chemical (surface charge and hydrophilicity properties), optoelectronic, biological (sensing) and biocompatible properties. Moreover, the macrodipole moment associated with the vector sum of the individual peptide dipoles in a helical secondary structure gives rise to an intrinsically polar SAM, which favours electron transfer in one precise direction and facilitates light-induced electron-hole separation, for appropriately placed chromophores [2]. I will talk in this presentation about the self-assembly properties of peptides on surface [3,4], on the modulation of their supramolecular structure by the proper design of the molecules and on their applications as artificial leaves[5,6]. References. 1. Lettieri R., Di Giorgio F., Colella A., Magnusson R., Bjorefors F., Placidi E., Palleschi A., Venanzi M., Gatto E. DPPTE Thiolipid Self-Assembled Monolayer: A Critical Assay. Langmuir 32, 11560–11572 (2016). 2. Yasutomi S., Morita T., Imanishi Y., Kimura S. A Molecular Photodiode System That Can Switch Photocurrent Direction. Science 204, 1944-1947 (2004). 3. Gatto E., Porchetta A., Scarselli M., De Crescenzi M., Formaggio F., Toniolo C. & Venanzi M. Playing with peptides: how to build a supramolecular Peptide nanostructure by exploiting helix···helix macrodipole interactions. Langmuir 28, 2817−2826 (2012). 4. Longo E., Wright K., Caruso M., Gatto E., Palleschi A., Scarselli M., De Crescenzi M., Crisma M, Formaggio F, Toniolo C. and Venanzi M. Peptide flatlandia: a new-concept peptide for positioning of electroactive probes in proximity to a metal surface. Nanoscale, 7, 15495-15506 (2015). 5. Gatto E., Quatela A., Caruso M., Tagliaferro R., De Zotti M., Formaggio F., Toniolo C., Di Carlo A., Venanzi M. Mimicking the Nature: A Novel Peptide-Based Bio-Inspired Approach for Solar Energy Conversion. ChemPhysChem 15, 64-68 (2014). 6. Venanzi M., Gatto E., Caruso M., Porchetta A., Formaggio F., Toniolo C. Photoinduced Electron Transfer through Peptide-Based Self-Assembled Monolayers Chemisorbed on Gold Electrodes: Directing the Flow-in and Flow-out of Electrons through Peptide Helices. J. Phys. Chem. A, 118, 6674-6684 (2014).

K.II.7
11:50
Authors : Professor Gil Rosenman
Affiliations : The Henry and Dinah Krongold Chair of Microelectronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University gilr@eng.tau.ac.il

Resume : Nanoscale optical labeling is an advanced bioimaging tool. There is a variety of fluorescence biolabels such as organic molecular dyes, genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, semiconductor quantum dots and metal gold-based nanostructures. In this work we focus on the development of a novel class of visible peptide nanodots for advanced, biocompatible imaging applications. Bioorganic nanodots of different origin, self-assembled from chemically synthesized peptide biomolecules of different origin, were observed in our works. We propose two different methods to create fluorescent peptide nanodots. The first method is a chemical modification method of bionanodots based on organic dyes molecules conjugated to biomolecules. The second method is based on a thermostructural process in these bionanodots that leads to formation of -sheet secondary structure. As we recently discovered, ultrashort dipeptide nanoensembles, which are rich in ordered -sheets, demonstrate blue/green fluorescence. The visible photon emission is ascribed to reconstruction of hydrogen binding bonds due to protons transfer between the N- and C-termini of adjacent fibril strands of -sheet structure. This process results in low energy electronic transitions and fluorescence in the visible region. The authors appreciate support of Ministry of Science, Technology & Space of Israel.

K.II.8
12:10
Authors : Nunzio Tuccitto, Graziana Messina, Giovanni Li-Destri, Antonino Licciardello, Giovanni Marletta
Affiliations : University of Catania, Dep. of Chemical Sciences and CSGI, ITALY

Resume : Through the development of miniaturized biodevices involving groundbreaking nanotechnologies, the common dreams of many years regarding miniaturized implanted devices are soon to become a glad reality. In fact, these devices are getting more reliable and efficient, even if some important topics remain partly unexplored. Among them, remote communication with implanted devices is still an open subject. The transformative applications of implanted micro and nanotechnology involve not just single biodevices working independently, but groups of them working in a network. Thus, before the promise of implanted nanotechnology can be fully achieved, the problem that remains to be solved is communication among nanodevices. Nature faced and solved these problems by means of a strategy that rely on the release through the biological fluids of molecules acting as “chemical messengers”. Even if the biological communication networks are still too complex to be replicated, in all our views, bio-inspired molecular communication represents definitively a very promising strategy. In this work, we present a critical analysis on the problem of molecular communication through body fluids focusing on the selection and synthesis of a capable molecular messenger. Starting from the theoretical model of advection and diffusion of chemical signals in confined pathway we propose a specific non-linear receiver’s response to the concentration. Accordingly, we synthesized a nanometric molecular messenger based on carboxylic quantum dots. A lab-scale prototypal molecular communication system is presented as a platform that could be used to evaluate chemical signals transfer in body fluids as an alternative to electromagnetic communication.

K.II.9
12:25 Lunch. General Photo.    
13:25
Authors : Arzum Erdem
Affiliations : Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Analytical Chemistry Department 35100 Bornova, Izmir, TURKEY

Resume : Aptamers are synthetic nucleic acids that could selectively bind to their target molecules similiar to the antibodies [1-4]. The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment) method has been used for the synthesis and the selection of aptamers to their specific target molecules. The improved stability properties including resistant to denaturation and degradation, easy modification, target adaptability and easy-to-stock make them more advantageous comparison to antibodies and ideal candidates as protein recognition elements in a wide range of bioassays, and also for diagnostic applications, especially aptamer based biosensors "aptasensors" [3-8]. An overview to the representative studies of nanomaterials based electrochemical aptasensors has been presented herein with their advantages and further applications. References 1- J. Muller, B. Isermann, C. Ducker, M. Salehi, M. Meyer, M. Friedrich, T. Madhusudhan, J. Oldenburg, G. Mayer, B. Potzsch, Chem. Biol. (2009) 16, 442-451. 2- M. Mascini, I. Palchetti, S. Tombelli, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (2012) 51, 1316-1332. 3- A. Erdem, H. Karadeniz, G. Mayer, M. Famulok, A. Caliskan, Electroanalysis (2009) 21, 1278-1284. 4- E. Eksin, G. Congur, A. Erdem, Aptasensor Technologies Developed for Detection of Toxins, In: Ed. D.P. Nikolelis, G-P. Nikoleli (eds.) Biosensors for Security and Bioterrorism Applications (2016) pp. 249-259, Springer, Ottawa, ON, Canada. 5- F. Rohrbach, H. Karadeniz, A. Erdem, M. Famulok, G. Mayer, Analytical Biochemistry (2012) 421, 454-459. 6- A. Erdem, G. Congur, Sensors and Actuators B: Chem. (2014) 196, 168-174 7- A. Erdem, G. Congur, Talanta (2014) 128, 428-433. 8- A. Erdem, E. Eksin, M. Muti, Colloid. Surf. B: Chem. (2014) 115, 205-211. Acknowledgements. A.E acknowledges as the Project Investigator for the financial support from Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council (TUBITAK) (Project no.111T073), and she also would like to express her gratitudes to the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) as the Principal member for its partial support.

K.II.10
13:45
Authors : G. I. Márk^1, K. Kertész^1, G. Piszter^1, Zs. Bálint^2, and L. P. Biró^1
Affiliations : ^1 Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, (MFA), Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary, http://www.nanotechnology.hu/ ^2 Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross Utca 13, H-1088 Budapest, Hungary

Resume : The color of various butterflies may originate not only from pigments, but from photonic nanoarchitectures found in the scales covering their body and wings, too [1]. The optical spectrum of these scales – usually of blue and green color – shows reversible changes [2] when the sample of the wing is exposed to an air–volatile vapor mixture. As we have shown earlier, these changes are chemically selective and depend monotonously on the vapor concentration. As the color change of the photonic nanoarchitecture is based on a capillary condensation process [3], it also depends on the temperature. Vapors influence the optical spectrum by several possible mechanisms, as liquid condensation in the air voids inside the photonic nanostructure and swelling of the chitin walls themselves. We performed full 3D electrodynamic calculations and compared the simulated spectra to the measured ones in order to reveal the influence of these possible processes on the optical response. [1] L. P. Biró & J. P. Vigneron, Laser Photonics Rev. 5, 27–51 (2011). [2] G. Piszter et al., Opt. Expr. 22, 22649 (2014). [3] K. Kertesz et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. C 39 221–226 (2014).

K.II.11
14:00
Authors : Heorhii Vorobets
Affiliations : Department of Computer Systems and Networks, Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2, Kotsyubynskyi str., Chernivtsi, 58000, Ukraine

Resume : The synergetics of the four branches of modern science and technology: nanotechnology, biotechnology and biomedicine, information technology and high-performance computer systems, and cognition science as an interdisciplinary convergence of psychology, linguistics, anthropology, neuroscience and artificial intelligence computer technology, called after NBIC (nano-bio-info-cogno) requires the creation and development of new approaches and modern technology to modeling and synthesis of cyber-physical and bio-cybernetic systems. The aim of this work was to study the basic bio-inspiring principles of modeling and design of this self-organized bio-robots, cyber-systems and of models with feedback for functional adaptability cyber-systems to resolving tasks. As a result, studies have shown that under conditions of partial uncertainty of input data the functional resistance have systems with self-reconfigurable architecture. The reconfigurability of cyber-systems should be considered separately for the physical / biological and informational levels. The use of artificial intelligence technology enables make deep analysis of information but is not sufficient to fully adapt the system to the external environment. A prerequisite here is technical (technological) capacity of the system to the correction of its own architecture. The functionality of the information management algorithms for input and control of data and the sensitivity of measuring part transducers of physical quantities in the system feedback determined by parameters of the sensors. It is clear that bio-inspired and bio-integrated microrobots, which are uses such sensors, including semiconductor, is nano- and micro-structured. However, the use of bio-inspired principles of structural organization of cyber systems appropriate are correct as in nano / micro and mega scale. In this study also shows the examples of the full cycle of synthesis of cyber-systems from create intelligent sensors and measuring transducers information signals based on nanostructured semiconductors to functionally completed cyber systems for medical and environmental problems and technological profile.

K.II.12
14:20
Authors : Manuela Schiek,(1) Matthias Schulz,(2) Majvor Mack,(1) Oliver Kolloge,(1) Arne Lützen.(2)
Affiliations : (1) University of Oldenburg; (2) University of Bonn

Resume : We suggest and explore a novel route towards organic photodetectors sensitive to the circular polarization state of light. For this, we insert fullerene-blended thin films of homochiral squaraine compounds acting as highly circular dichroic active layer into conventional bulk hetero-junction photodiodes. The substitution pattern of non-toxic and environmentally stable dihydroxy-anilino squaraines is modified with a chiral pool reactant. The L-proline derivatives of choice are available in their enantiomerically pure forms making costly separation of racemic product mixtures obsolete [1]. Strong excitonic circular dichroism is measured in spin-casted neat and fullerene-blended thin films proving homo-chiral aggregation. The device performance depends on the blend ratio of squaraine and fullerene as well as on active layer thickness. In all cases, the devices suffer from a low fill factor, which is accompanied by a voltage-dependent photocurrent. The strong circular dichroism of the photoactive layer can enable a photocurrent-readout sensitive to the circular polarization state of the incident light [2]. Most promising devices in that sense contain a thick and donor-rich active layer with a spectral overlap of strongest photocurrent response and maximum circular dichroism within the green spectral range [3]. [1] R. S. Stoll, N. Severin, J. P. Rabe, S. Hecht, Adv. Mater. 2006, 18: 1271. [2] J. Gilot, R. Abbel, G. Lakhwani, E. W. Meijer, A. P. H. J. Schenning, S. C. J. Meskers, Adv. Mater. 2009, 22: 131. [3] M. Schulz, M. Mack, O. Kolloge, A. Lützen, M. Schiek, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. submitted 2017.

K.II.13
14:35
Authors : Dr. Emanuela Gatto,1 Marta De Zotti,2 Fernando Formaggio,2 and Mariano Venanzi.1
Affiliations : 1 Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata“, 00133 Rome, Italy; 2 Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, CNR, Padova Unit, Department of Chemistry, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy

Resume : The self-assembly ability of molecules is of fundamental importance in modern science and technology, making possible to produce creative nanostructures with a precision that is not achievable with classical lithographic miniaturization techniques. In particular, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by helical oligopeptides are very promising materials, used as archetypal systems in various field of current nanoscience research, materials science, molecular biology and surface science, and with potential application as molecular sensors, optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.[1-4] The motivation of using helical peptides for the creation of stable monolayers is to exploit the unique features of polypeptide molecules: they can be easily functionalized with smart groups, making possible to design the peptide sequence in a suitable way for their application; if functionalized with groups able to bind surfaces, they can form stable bio-hybrid monolayers with polar properties. The polarity is conferred by the macrodipole moment associated with the vector sum of the individual peptide dipoles in an alpha-helical secondary structure and it would favours electron transfer in one precise direction for appropriately placed chromophores, making the peptide to behave like a molecular diode. [5-7] In this work the photocurrent generation properties of mono- and bi-component peptide-based SAMs are studied by electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. We discovered that the incident photon to current conversion efficiencies are correlated to the tridimensional peptide assembly capabilities, which are influenced by kinetic and thermodynamic factors. The importance of molecular organization for the optimization of the photoconversion efficiency will be emphasized. REFERENCES. [1] Gatto E., Stella L., Baldini C., Venanzi M., Toniolo C., Formaggio F. Superlattices Microstruct. 46, 34−39 (2009). [2] Gatto E., Porchetta A., Scarselli M., De Crescenzi M., Formaggio F., Toniolo C. & Venanzi M. Langmuir 28, 2817−2826 (2012). [3] Gatto E., Quatela A., Caruso M., Tagliaferro R., De Zotti M., Formaggio F., Toniolo C., Di Carlo A., Venanzi M. ChemPhysChem 15, 64-68 (2014). [4] Gatto E., Venanzi M. Israel Journal of Chemistry, 55, 671-681 (2015). [5] Gatto E, Caruso M., Porchetta A., Formaggio F., Toniolo C., Crisma M., Venanzi M. J. Pept. Sci. 17, 124–131 (2011). [6] Venanzi M., Gatto E., Caruso M., Porchetta A., Formaggio F., Toniolo C. J. Phys. Chem. A, 118, 6674-6684 (2014). [7] Gatto E., Caruso M. and Venanzi M. Handbook of Nanoelectrochemistry: Electrochemical Synthesis Methods, Properties, and Characterization Techniques, Aliofkhazraei, M., Makhlouf, A.S.H. eds, Pages 503-560 (2016).

K.II.14
14:45
Authors : Carlos Serpa,1,2 Alexandre D. Silva,1 Gonçalo F. F. Sá,2 Luis G. Arnaut 1
Affiliations : 1 CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra, Portugal 2 LaserLeap Technologies, IPN, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra, Portugal

Resume : The objective of must bioactive agents is to reach the inside of cells in order to perform an action leading to a biological benign response. Additionally, in genetic therapy, the introduction of molecules into the nucleus of a cell is needed. Cellular membranes offers a barrier to foreign molecules, that bioactive agents need to overcome. Skin is the first anatomical barrier to all kinds of pathogens, and the dermal administration of drugs has to overcome the very efficient protection it offers. We unfold an alternative method to transiently breach skin and cell membranes: the use of photoacoustic waves to open channels through those barriers, so that molecules can diffuse rapidly before they reversible close, within few minutes.[1,2] We describe the development of materials capable of the fast and efficient conversion of the energy in a laser pulse into a high frequency broadband pressure transient. This development was guided by the fundamental theoretical understanding of the processes involved, by the ability to develop adequate chromophores and substrates for light-to-pressure transduction, and by the understanding of the interaction between the photoacoustic waves and the biological membrane. Photoacoustic pressure waves generated by pico and nanoseconds laser pulses are shown to promote the dermal delivery of molecules as lidocaine, porphyrins, hyaluronic acid, and proteins, as well as cell transfection, with a reversibility that allows skin to recover its protective function and cells to remain viable. [1] G. F. F. Sá, C. Serpa, L. G. Arnaut, patent application WO/2012/144916, 19 April 2012. [2] G. F. F. Sá, C. Serpa, L. G. Arnaut, J. Control. Release, 167, 290-300 (2013). Acknowledgements: This work was performed under project “Photoacoustic Permeabilization of Biological Barriers – A Window for Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection” , with reference PTDC/QEQ-MED/3521/2014 funded by European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), through COMPETE 2020 - Operational Programme for Competitiveness and Internationalisation (OPCI), and by national funds, through FCT - Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia I.P.”.

K.II.15
15:00
Authors : Serpil Tekoglu[1-2]*; Guan Ni-Yeo [1-2]; Markus Bender [3]; Anthony Morfa[1-2]; Uli Lemmer[1]; Manuel Hamburger[3]; Gerardo Hernandez-Sosa[1-2]
Affiliations : [1] Light Technology Institute, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engesserstr 13, 76131, Karlsruhe, Germany; [2] InnovationLab GmbH, Speyerer Str 4, 69115, Heidelberg, Germany; [3] Institute of Organic Chemistry, Heidelberg University, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

Resume : In mid of 1990s, the Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells (LECs) came out as an alternative device concept to OLEDs[1]. The simple device architecture with a single organic layer and silver (Ag) cathode makes it advantageous for printing processes[2]. Today, one of the important arguments in the organic electronics field is to replace the synthetic polymers with biopolymers for biodegradable, biocompatible electronics[3-4]. This is comforted by the present scientific policy related to the humanity problem of creation of sustainability and minimizing the environmental pollution by reducing the electronic-waste[5]. In this work, DNA and the DNA-lipid complex (DNA-CTMA) were tested as Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPEs) from aqueous and organic solvent media. Different salts were engaged as additional ionic source and the ionic conductivity for different ratios was investigated. The blend of SPEs and commercially available water-soluble blue emitter or organo-soluble yellow emitter was deposited between two electrodes to form the active layer. The luminance-voltage-current density characteristics and lifetime were investigated. The maximum luminance was recorded 2000 cd/m2 and 7 cd/m2 for yellow and blue BioLECs, respectively, with the turn on voltages of 3.5-10 V. The ionic conductivity of SPEs was obtained at the range of 10-6 S/cm at RT using impedance spectroscopy. Additionally, morphology of the blend films and electrochemical stability window of SPEs were explored. References [1] Q. B. Pei, G. Yu, C. Zhang, Y. Yang, A. J. Heeger, Science 269, 1086-1088 (1995). [2] G. Hernandez?Sosa, S. Tekoglu, S. Stolz, R. Eckstein, C. Teusch, J. Trapp, U. Lemmer, M. Hamburger, N. Mechau, Adv. Mat. 26, 3235-3240 (2014). [3] B. Singh and N. S. Sariciftci, Proc. OEC 1-4, (2006). [4] M. Irimia-Vladu, Chem. Soc. Rev. 43, 588-610 (2014). [5] I. Rau, J. G. Grote, F. Kajzar and A. Pawlicka, C. R. Physique 13, 853-864 (2012).

K.II.16
15:15
Authors : Marta De Zotti, Alessandro Moretto, Emanuela Gatto, Grazia M.L. Messina, Giovanni Marletta
Affiliations : Marta De Zotti; Alessandro Moretto: Department of Chemistry, University of Padova, via Marzolo 1, 35131 Padova (Italy). Emanuela Gatto: Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Roma (Italy). Grazia M.L. Messina; Giovanni Marletta: Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology, Dept. of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, 95125 Catania, Italy.

Resume : The world of the 21st century depends crucially on electronic devices that, in turn, rely on charge transport: transistors and chips have changed our life in a remarkable way... And this will continue. In Nature, electron transfer processes are of the utmost importance and wonderfully performed: just think of enzymes or the photosynthesis. Therefore, the development of electronic devices based on bio-molecules is highly desirable, also to give them a biocompatible essence. However, biomolecules have often little stability outside their natural environment. Our "bionic peptides" are biopolymers that possess - even when short - well-defined helical structures, remarkably stable under extreme environmental conditions. Their exciting features stem from their constituents: sterically hindered, non-coded α-amino acids. In this presentation, we will show our results towards the exploitation of the emerging properties of our bionic peptides to develop bio-molecular wires. We applied an exciting, bio-inspired approach based on nucleobase paring to give our peptides the skill to self-organize into long and tunable wires, thus propagating their effects in a domino-like fashion. The peptide fibers anchored on a gold surface were able to mediate the photocurrent generated by means of a porphyrin-based dye.

K.II.17
15:30 Coffee Break. General Photo    
15:50
Authors : F. Balzer, H. Kollmann, M. Silies, M. Schulz, A. Lützen, Ch. Lienau, M. Schiek
Affiliations : Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, DK-6400 Sønderborg, Denmark; Ultrafast Nanooptics, Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg, Germany; Kekulé Institute for Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bonn, Gerhard-Domagk-Str.1, D-53121 Bonn, Germany; Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg, Germany

Resume : Recently, thin films based on an anilino-squaraine dye, blended with a commercial fullerene, have attracted quite some interest as possible artificial photoreceptors for vision restoration [1]. Upon thermal annealing these films become highly textured which enhances growth and adhesion of biological cells. To get more insight into the basic properties of thin squaraine films, we investigate the neat dihydroxy anilino squaraine 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl]-squaraine (SQIB), spin-casted on glass. Depending on the annealing temperature, SQIB crystallizes into two polymorphic structures: a monoclinic phase and an orthorhombic phase. They exhibit different absorption spectra with characteristic spectral signatures of molecular excitons with oblique transition dipole alignment and large Davydov splitting. Polarization-resolved confocal spectro-microscopy shows that the transitions of the excitonic states for each polymorph are polarized mutually perpendicular. The crystalline domains are distributed with random in-plane orientation on the samples, but X-ray diffraction reveals a strong out-of-plane orientation for both polymorphs. Their local in-plane orientation is deduced from spectro-microscopy recordings and polarized light microscopy. REFERENCES. [1] O. S. Abdullaeva, M. Schulz, F. Balzer, J. Parisi, A. Lützen, K. Dedek, M. Schiek, Langmuir 32, 9297-9302 (2016).

K.II.18
16:05
Authors : Anna Pratsinis, Georgios A. Kelesidis, Frank Krumeich, Jean-Christophe Leroux, Georgios A. Sotiriou
Affiliations : Drug Formulation and Delivery, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, 8093, Zurich, Switzerland; Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden

Resume : Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an abundant molecule associated with several biological implications and reacts with natural enzymes such as catalase. Thus, H2O2 quantification in vitro constitutes a powerful tool for the detection of numerous disease biomarkers linked to enzyme-based assays. However, the label-free optical H2O2 biosensing in biological media and at low concentrations (sub-uM) has yet to be achieved. Herein, we rationally design a biomimetic artificial enzyme based on antioxidant CeO2 nanoparticles that become luminescent upon their Eu3+ doping. We vary systematically their size from 4 to 16 nm and study the size-effect on their catalase-mimetic activity manifested as the catalytic H2O2 decomposition in aqueous solutions. The strong CeO2 nanoparticle surface area-dependent antioxidant activity reveals that this process is mainly a surface-related phenomenon. The interaction of H2O2 species with the nanoparticle surface influences drastically the luminescence of CeO2:Eu3+ that originates from the surface layer rendering them highly sensitive H2O2 biosensors down to 0.15 M (5.2 ppb) in biologically-relevant solutions. Our results demonstrate how nanoparticle structural characteristics can be engineered to develop a highly sensitive H2O2 biosensor and link two, so far, unrelated research domains of the CeO2 nanoparticle antioxidant activity and luminescence based on their rare-earth doping. The here developed biomimetic artificial enzyme can become the starting point of sophisticated in vitro assays towards the highly sensitive detection of disease biomarkers.

K.II.19
16:15
Authors : Prof. Carolyn A. KOH
Affiliations : Colorado School of Mines, Center for Hydrate Research, Chemical Engineering Dept., Golden, CO 80401, USA

Resume : Gas clathrate hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds comprised of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules that can trap small gas molecules in the water cavities [1]. The interfacial interactions of clathrate hydrate containing systems are critical to the exploration of new frontiers of clathrate hydrate research, including advanced strategies in energy transportation and recovery, as well as overcoming the current barrier to energy storage of fuels in gas hydrate crystals [2,3]. The inter-particle interactions of clathrate hydrate crystals in water and oil continuous systems are examined at high pressure and low temperature conditions. Addition of surface-active molecules can be used to modify these processes, e.g. altering the crystal growth processes, or reducing the inter-particle interactions. The clathrate hydrate formation synthesis pathways can be a key strategy to designing higher storage capacity materials, and/or stabilizing new stable and metastable crystal structures. Structure metastability has been observed through spectroscopic and computational studies [4]. An overview of the key technological advancements and challenges in clathrate hydrate research, and the potential role of interfacial phenomena is presented. Acknowledgements: Funding and support is acknowledged from the CSM Hydrate Center Consortium, CSM REMRSEC, and the William K. Coors Fund and Coors Foundation. [1] E.D. Sloan & C.A. Koh, Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases, 3rd Ed., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL (2007). [2] Z. Aman & C.A. Koh, Chemical Society Reviews, 45, 1678-1690 (2016). [3] L.J. Florusse, C.J. Peters, J. Schoonman, K.C. Hester, C.A., Koh, S.F. Dec, K.N. Marsh, E.D. Sloan, Science, 306, 469-471 (2004). [4] M.R. Walsh, C.A. Koh, E.D. Sloan, A.K. Sum, D.T. Wu, Science, 326, 1095-1098 (2012).

K.II.20
 
Young Investigator Forum. Keynote Session ( the 7 minutes presentations) : Organizers/Chairs-Federico Zen, PhD Student, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland & Valentine Blashchuk Bach D Student, TSN University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine . Supervisor Professor Dr. Manuela Schiek, University of Oldenburg, Germany
16:45
Authors : Alice C. Taylor, Citalali Gonzalez, Barbora Vagaska, Patrizia Ferretti, Richard B. Jackman
Affiliations : London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Electronic and Electrical and Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH, UK. UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guildford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

Resume : Neural stem cells (NSCs) have great potential for inducing repair in damaged areas of the nervous system. NSCs have the ability to self-renew, but also are able to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, which are the main cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Understanding the differentiation into these cell lineages is critical for regenerative therapy treatment of diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, as detailed knowledge of how these specific cells are affected by disease is vital(1) In order to utilise the potential of stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine, it is essential that we are able to isolate the cells from their natural setting, propagate the cells in culture, and introduce the cells to a foreign environment(2). Given the outstanding biocompatibility of nanodiamonds (NDs) towards neuronal cells(3), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) towards hNSCs(4) and their excellent ability to promote neuronal cell adhesion and outgrowth, the proliferation and differentiation of human NSCs (hNSCs) and their relationship with functionalised ND coatings has been investigated. Firstly, the interaction of hNSCs with varying surface functionalised NDs is investigated; with Oxygen-terminated functionalised surfaces favouring the proliferation of hNSC, compared to those with a Hydrogen-terminated surface. Quantitative cell count data of the hNSCs has been determined on the varying functionalised NDs as well as glass and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), along with contact angle and protein adsorption investigations suggesting a hypothesis for this result. Secondly ND surfaces of different functionalisation (H/O) are shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of hNSCs in varying ways. hNSCs fate has been investigated via inducing and spontaneously differentiating the cells on varying nanodiamond substrates. 1. Lindvall O, Kokaia Z. Stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders. Nature. Nature Publishing Group; 2006 Jun 29;441(7097):1094–6. 2. Scadden DT. The stem-cell niche as an entity of action. Nature. 2006 Jun 29;441(7097):1075–9. 3. Thalhammer A, Edgington RJ, Cingolani LA, Schoepfer R, Jackman RB. The use of nanodiamond monolayer coatings to promote the formation of functional neuronal networks. Biomaterials. 2010 Mar;31(8):2097–104. 4. Taylor AC, Vagaska B, Edgington R, Hebert C, Ferretti P, Bergonzo P, et al. Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells. J Neural Eng. IOP Publishing; 2015 Dec 1;12(6):066016.

K.FII.1
16:45
Authors : Donata Iandolo, [1] Magali Ferro,[1] Charalampos Pitsalidis,[1] Sahika Inal,[2] Adel Hama,[1] Roisin Owens [1]
Affiliations : [1] Department of Bioelectronics, Centre Microélectronique de Provence, Gardanne, France. [2] Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, KAUST, Saudi Arabia.

Resume : Large research efforts are being applied to develop alternatives to the current practices in the field of animal studies. The aim is to give an answer to the drawbacks of the use of animals to test drugs and medical devices for human use, meeting the so-called 3Rs principals of reduction, refinement and replacement in this field.[1] One powerful way in this diretion is represented by in vitro models where specific organs or tissues are recreated, recapitulating the in vivo mechanical and chemical environments experienced by cells in our body. We aim to reproduce the in vivo environment and to endow our device with the possibility of both monitoring cells processes and actively addressing them (i.e. electrical stimulation). To this end the scaffold material plays a pivotal role. A tridimensional electroactive scaffold has been developed starting from the conductive conjugated polymer PEDOT:PSS. Organic bioelectronic devices represent a novel technology allowing for label-free, non -invasive monitoring of cells through an electronic readout, additionally providing real-time measurements. In addition to the obvious advantages of low cost processing, compatibility with large area applications, and tunability of properties through chemical synthesis, organic electronic materials transcend the current state of the art in transduction and stimulation of electrical activity in cells displaying the ability to conduct ions, thereby providing a lower impedance connection to cells.[2] The developed scaffolds were showed to allow cells proliferation and its monitoring via an electronic read out (scaffolds impedance). The achieved results pave the way for the successful development of 3D models of different tissues and organs (i.e. blood brain barrier, bone) where it will be possible not only to monitor cells state but also actively stimulate them. [1] https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/the-3rs, [2] Cui, X. et al. Biomaterials 24, 777 (2003).

K.FII.2
16:45
Authors : Mohammad Mirkhalaf, Amanul Sunesara, Behnam Ashrafi, Benoit Simard, and Francois Barthelat
Affiliations : M. Mirkhalaf, A. Sunesara, and B. Ashrafi are with the National Research Council of Canada, 5145 Decelles Avenue, Montreal, QC H3T 2B2 (phone: +1 (514) 283 9209, Fax: +1 (514) 283 9445, emails: mohammad.mirkhalaf@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, Amanul.Sunesara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, Behnam.Ashrafi@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca) B. Simard is with National Research Council Canada, Room 1043-100 Sussex Drive Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (phone: 613-990-0977, fax: 613-991-2648, email: Benoit.Simard@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca) F. Barthelat is with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC H3A 2K6, Canada (phone: 514-398-6318, Fax.: 514-398-7365, email: francois.barthelat@mcgill.ca)

Resume : Natural hard materials such as mollusk shell, tooth enamel and bone possess outstanding combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, which outclass most engineering materials. These natural materials are composed of stiff and strong building blocks which are arranged in designed architectures and interact through weak interfaces. The stiffness and strength of the materials come from the blocks, while their toughness come from intricate interplays between the architecture of the materials and their weaker interfaces. Inspired by these materials, this study demonstrates how simple cutting/assembling of ceramic bocks can be used to develop topologically interlocked ceramic panels with combinations of stiffness, strength, and impact resistance. The fabrication process results in low porosity ceramic blocks with smooth surfaces which were then assembled manually to make architectured panels. The panels were tested in impact loading condition. Compared to plain ceramic panels, the architectured panels was 50 times more impact resistant (in energy terms), at the expense of only 50-60 % decrease in stiffness and strength. This material demonstrates how bioinspiration, weak interfaces and material architecture can be harnessed to expand the capabilities of materials towards new directions.

K.FII.3
16:45
Authors : Yong-Bing Chong, Chee-Yoon Yue, Jinglei Yang
Affiliations : School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Resume : Essential oils (EOs) produced from plant extracts have gained wide attention in recent years owing to its multifunctional properties. EOs have low toxicity and degrade quickly in soil and water, rendering them with environmental friendly property. Among the EOs, clove oil has been studied extensively due to its antimicrobial effect against a wide range of bacteria strains. However, the volatility and chemical instability of clove oil has severely limited its potential uses. In this study, clove oil is encapsulated using both in-situ and interfacial polymerization to enhance its chemical stability and prevent premature leakage under harsh environment. The formation of double layer polyurethane/poly (urea-formaldehyde) (PU/PUF) shell was confirmed through the cross-sectional view which shows distinct porous PU and dense PUF layers. Several reaction parameters were studied to fabricate microcapsules with different release profiles. Moreover, the release profile of these microcapsules was found to fit the Baker-Lonsdale model which identifies diffusion as the release mechanism. Through the standard plate count method, these microcapsules containing clove oil was proven to exhibit antibacterial activity against V. Coralliilyticus, a temperature dependent global marine pathogen that can cause coral diseases and contribute to marine biofilm. These microcapsules containing clove oil have great potential to be an eco-friendly solution to replace existing toxic antifouling agent.

K.FII.4
16:45
Authors : Paul Rouster, Marko Pavlovic, Istvan Szilagyi
Affiliations : Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry / Laboratory of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, University of Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1205, Geneva, Switzerland

Resume : Antioxidant enzymes are widely used in biomedical treatments or in chemical manufacturing processes to convert reactive oxygen species (ROS) into oxygen and water. However, the operating conditions (pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc.) can affect the enzyme properties and their reusability is often limited. To increase their functional stability and recyclability, enzyme immobilization on nanoparticles is a promising approach. We have investigated antioxidant systems based on layered nanomaterials such as titania nanosheets (TNS) or layered double hydroxides (LDH). Immobilization of antioxidant enzymes or enzyme-like complexes on the nanomaterials occurred through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. As the nanomaterials possessed limited stability at low/moderate salt concentrations, they were functionalized with polyelectrolytes in order to increase the colloidal stability of the system and also to further protect the enzymes. Upon polyelectrolyte adsorption, charge neutralization (aggregating system) or overcharging (stable suspension) of the particles could be observed at appropriate doses. The fully coated nanomaterials resulted in stable suspensions where primary particles were observed. Finally, the catalytic activity of the immobilized and embedded enzymes were measured and compared to the native one.

K.FII.5
16:45
Authors : Sharad Kharel, Say Chye Joachim Loo
Affiliations : 1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore : 1.School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 2. Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Resume : Biodegradable polymer particulate systems, such as poly(d-lactic-co-glyocolic acid) (PLGA), are frequently used as vehicles for controlled release of bioactive molecules. However, these systems suffer from the inherent problem of acidification of the internal environment due to the acidic degradation products during the release period. This has been reported to perturb the configuration of encapsulated peptides. Additionally, unrealistically slow and incomplete release of bioactive molecules are also other shortcomings of this otherwise very capable delivery system. To mitigate these issues, hollow PLGA particles are fabricated through a novel one-step osmogen mediated oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation technique. These hollow particles are loaded with Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone, to evaluate the efficacy of the system over the solid particles as a delivery vehicle. While the solid particles are shown to be suffering from incomplete release of the peptide, the hollow particles are shown to be easily optimized to achieve various release profiles, including complete release, by simply adjusting the amount of osmogen in the formulation. Additionally, these hollow particles are also shown to be effective in maintaining the structural integrity and bioactivity of the encapsulated peptide, while degradation of the encapsulated peptide was observed in the solid particles during the release study.

K.FII.6
16:45
Authors : O. Deschaume (1), Y. de Coene(1), J. Ye (2), C. Bartic (1)
Affiliations : (1) Soft matter Physics and Biophysics unit, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D - box 2416, 3001 Leuven, Belgium, olivier.deschaume@kuleuven.be; (2) School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai, 200030, China

Resume : Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to dynamically tune the properties of extracellular matrices. They can be used to modulate cell adhesion, migration or activity [1], and to monitor parameters remotely and with a high spatial resolution [2,3]. In this study, we are producing biofibrillar hybrid matrices from fibre-forming proteins such as lysozyme or collagen, and a range of inorganic materials including gold nanoparticles and quantum dots [4]. We present 3 approaches for obtaining such bioinorganic scaffolds: where the NPs produced separately are grafted onto the nanofibers, where they are formed on the scaffolds or together with the scaffolds. Each approach leads to specific material dimensions and shapes, phase distribution and mechanical and optical properties as demonstrated by AFM and spectroscopic data. At last the behaviour of living cells is investigated for the different types of matrices. [1] Zhu, M.; Baffou, G.; Meyerbröker, N.; Polleux, J. ACS Nano 2012, 6, 7227–7233. [2] Debruyne, D.; Deschaume, O.; Coutiño-Gonzalez, E.; Locquet, J.-P.; Hofkens, J.; Van Bael, M. J.; Bartic, C. Nanotechnology 2015, 26, 255703. [3] Liu, L.; Zhong, K.; Meng, L.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Wang, L.; Glorieux, C. J. Appl. Phys. 2016, 119, 224902. [4] Deschaume, O.; De Roo, B.; Van Bael, M. J.; Locquet, J.-P.; Van Haesendonck, C.; Bartic, C. Chem. Mater. 2014, 26, 5383–5393.

K.FII.7
16:45
Authors : Angela Mutschler, Nihal Engin Vrana, Pierre Schaaf, Philippe Lavalle
Affiliations : Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale INSERM, Biomaterials and Bioengineering Laboratory, 11 rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg, France

Resume : Coatings with antimicrobial properties are garnering interest to prevent implant-associated infections. Recently we showed that poly(arginine)/hyaluronic acid (PAR/HA) multilayers built with PAR chains constituted of 30 arginine residues (PAR30) have strong antimicrobial properties through a contact killing mechanism. This property is due to ability of PAR30 chains, when associated with hyaluronic acid, to diffuse in the multilayer. Secondly, we investigate the effect of the nature of the polyanion on the antimicrobial behavior of (PAR30/polyanion) multilayers against bacteria. Four polysaccharides, one polypeptide and one synthetic polyelectrolyte are investigated. Surprisingly, only HA leads to films with antimicrobial character. We relate this property to the strong diffusion capacity of PAR30 chains in (PAR30/HA) multilayers compared to their diffusion ability in the other (PAR30/polyanion) films. Through isothermal microcalorimetry experiments we also demonstrate that interactions in solution of PAR30 chains with the different polyanions are characterized by a negative reaction enthalpy for all the investigated polyanions except for HA, where the enthalpy of reaction is positive. Moreover, the molecular weight of HA is not a key parameter of the diffusion abilliity of PAR chains or for the bioactivity of the film. These results constitute an important step towards the establishment of rules to design contact-killing antimicrobial polyelectrolyte multilayers.

K.FII.8
16:45
Authors : Antonio Capretti, Andrew Ringsmuth, Julian van Velsen, Roberta Croce and Tom Gregorkiewicz
Affiliations : University of Amsterdam, VU Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, VU Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam

Resume : Photosynthesis, the conversion of sunlight to chemical energy, holds huge promise for energy production and storage, in both biological systems and inorganic bio-inspired ones. In higher plants, the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis occur in sites with nanoscale geometry and heterogeneous protein composition: the thylakoid membranes inside chloroplasts. In these sites, ray optics fails to adequately describe light absorption. We address the complexity of thylakoid membranes, in terms of structure and light-harvesting protein composition, with a rigorous nano-optical approach. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the thylakoid membranes provide additional photonic functionalities to photosynthesis. Thylakoid membranes are arranged in cylindrical stacks called grana, and in neighboring lamellae. The light-harvesting complexes I and II are preferentially concentrated in the lamellae and in the grana, respectively. We study the effects of grana shape, size and separation by full-wave electromagnetic solvers, and correlate them to protein distribution. Our results reveal that photonic resonances and interferences are accountable for a rational light management in chloroplasts. Providing description of complex bio-systems in a rigorous approach used for solid-state photonics, our study unveils original aspects of natural photosynthesis and sets novel directions for bio-inspired inorganic light conversion devices.

K.FII.9
16:45
Authors : Chiara Musumeci [a], Olle Inganäs [b].
Affiliations : [a] NUANCE Center, Northwestern University, 60208-3113 Evanston IL, USA. e-mail: chiara.musumeci@northwestern.edu; [b] Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.

Resume : Hierarchically organized nanoscale structures act as building blocks in the formation of both natural and man-made biosystems. Supramolecular interactions are involved in the assembly of highly ordered structures which are ultimately responsible for shape, structure and function of such biosystems. Whereas the overall assessment of these systems role is obtained by macroscopic evaluations, their nanoscale characterization is fundamental to uncover important underlying molecular mechanisms governing their complex behavior. Here we show how advanced scanning probe microscopy techniques can be successfully employed to characterize self-assembled bio-nanostructures thanks to their ability to simultaneously correlate the morphology with local properties at the nanoscale. Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) for example is used to probe electrical conduction within nanostructures obtained by the self-assembly of biomolecules with organic polymers. Conductive polymers are here used to coat proteins superstructures, such as amyloid fibers,[1, 2] or to be incorporate into model lipid membranes,[3] by exploiting non-covalent interactions. In this way, the conductive properties of conjugated organic polymer are combined with the high structural order of biomolecular nanotemplates, with the perspective to be exploited in a variety of functional components, or possibly integrated into biological systems. The nanoscale characterization of bio-nanostructures by advanced Scanning Probe Microscopy opens fascinating perspectives for accessing new properties and processes within biosystems in a non-destructive manner, possibly enabling new modes of observing biological processes. [1] A. Elfwing, F. G. Bäcklund, C. Musumeci, O. Inganäs and N. Solin, Decorated Protein Nanowires with conductive properties, J. Mater. Chem. C, 3, 6499, 2015. [2] F. Bäcklund, A. Elfwing, C. Musumeci, F. N. Ajjan, V. Babenko, W. Dzwolak, N. Solin, O. Inganäs, PEDOT-S coated protein fibril microhelices, submitted for publication. [3] P. Johansson, D. Jullesson, A. Elfwing, S. I Liin, C. Musumeci, E. Zeglio, F. Elinder, N. Solin, and O. Inganäs, Electronic polymers in lipid membranes, Sci. Rep. 5, 11242, 2015.

K.FII.10
16:45
Authors : Loh Yue Yan Amelia1, Nur Sabrina Wahid, Professor Tony Cass3 and Dr Tim Albrecht2
Affiliations : 1.Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London (similar for all authors) Email: y.loh16@imperial.ac.uk 2.Reader in Physical Chemistry
 Imperial College London, Department of Chemistry Email: t.albrecht@imperial.ac.uk 3.Imperial College London,Department of Chemistry Imperial College Rd, SW7 2AZ, London Email: t.cass@imperial.ac.uk

Resume : Single-molecule nucleic acid electronic sensing has the potential to be developed into rapid, sensitive, accurate and low-cost point-of-care biosensors. In single-molecule electronic sensing, analytes are driven through a nanopore via electrophoresis. The temporary blockage of the pore will register an ionic current fluctuation. The electrical signal (current amplitude change, duration of fluctuation, substructure) reflects the identity of the analyte. To achieve the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences, we propose a sensing strategy that involves the attachment of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes as overhangs on a long ssDNA carrier strand. Complementary target sequences will hybridise to the probes, transforming the overhangs from a compact coil (unhybridised ssDNA) to a stiff rod structure (dsDNA). Thus, a large secondary current drop can be detected when a hybridised probe on the DNA carrier strand translocates through the nanopore. Multi-analyte detection will be investigated by attaching different probes on the same carrier DNA (from bacteriophage M13). Specific hybridised probes can be identified by converting temporal signals to spatial positions. Our group has recently reported the use of custom-designed, low noise (high current resolution), high bandwidth (detect fast events) current amplifiers to enhance signal output. The custom-designed electronics will allow us detect and differentiate between hybridised and unhybridised overhangs.

K.FII.11
16:45
Authors : Rinat Meir, Katerina Shamalov, Oshra Betzer, Cyrille Cohen and Rachela Popovtzer
Affiliations : Faculty of Engineering Bar-Ilan University Israel

Resume : Cell-based therapy is the transplantation of living cells for the treatment of diseases and injuries. Such therapy offers a promising solution for the treatment of various pathologies that conventional medicine cannot cure effectively, thus encouraging future medical breakthroughs. For instance, cancer-fighting T cells may be injected in the course of cancer immunotherapy, and stem cells may treat neurodegenerative diseases, heart disease, muscular dystrophy and diabetes. A major obstacle in the advancement and implementation of cell therapy is the challenge of no-invasively tracking transplanted cells in the body. In vivo cell tracking could elucidate essential knowledge regarding mechanisms underlying the success or failure of therapy. An optimal solution for the challenge of cell tracking does not yet exist hence the need for an accurate imaging technique. We developed a novel methodology for longitudinal and quantitative in vivo cell tracking, based on the combination of CT as an imaging modality and gold nanoparticles as labeling agents. We were able to show that uniting the superior visualization abilities of classical CT with state-of-the-art nanotechnology is the key for high-resolution cell tracking. In the future, this technology has the potential to be applied clinically and to serve as an early warning system for patients after cell transplantation.

K.FII.12
16:45
Authors : V.Blashchuk1, D.Karpenko3, O.Ivanyuta1, N.Tsierkezos2, U.Ritter2, P.Scharff2, E.Buzaneva1
Affiliations : 1Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Faculty of RadioPhysics Electronics and Computer Systems, Volodymyrska Str. 64/13, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine, 2Institute for Chemistry and Biotechnology, 98684, Ilmenau, Germany, PF 100565; 3 NTU of Ukraine ?KPI?, Politechnichna14, 03056, Kyiv-56,Ukraine

Resume : The design concept to create the stimuli responsive photoactive at visible range carbon tubes nanostructures is based on constructed molecular models for the photoemission of semiconductor carbon nanotubes (CNT’s) functionalized by attached to the core and ends photoactive molecular complexes: metal (d - transition metal Cu) - organic (azole ligand) complex or by this complexe with coordinative bonded biomolecule (histidine). The tubes are the building blocks for nanostructures organization due to bonds between the metal ions and the ligands or the histidine molecules at different tubes. The architecture (SEM images) and the photoemission (PL spectroscopy) for nanostructures from these functionalized MWCNT in adsorbed layer at silicon substrate are characterized. The SEM images for this layer are interpreted using proposed molecular architectures models for building blocks connected through Cu2 with attached two ligands molecules at different tubes cores and these bonds are partially retain in the complexes with coordinative bonded histedine molecules that can decrease formation of these structures due to their adsorbing on tubes. These layers with namely one and both two types of nanostructures are characterized by photoemission wide bands, having different intensities and different three subbands in visible range

K.FII.13
16:45
Authors : Ao Zhuang, Yongjun Bian, Jianwei Zhou, Huili Shao, Xuechao Hu, Bo Zhu*, Yaopeng Zhang
Affiliations : Donghua University PhD candidate in Materials Science State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials College of Materials Science and Engineering Donghua University Shanghai 201620, China Tel:+8621-67792948 E-mail: zhuangao1992723@163.com

Resume : Silk fibroin is a good candidate to fabricate conductive biomaterial for bioelectrical applications because of its excellent mechanical property, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The modification by conductive polymer can endow silk fibroin with novel conductive functionality. Poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and its derivatives are very potential for the modification due to the high conductivity, biocompatibility, environmental stability and light transmittance. However, the hydrophobic PEDOT monomers have difficulties in absorbing and synthesizing on the surface of silk fibroin. In order to improve the efficiency of the polymerization, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was adopted as surfactant while ammonium persulfate (APS) was used as oxidant. Poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-OH) was polymerized and covalently deposited as a conducting layer on the surface of RSF film. The effects of the dosages of surfactant and oxidant, initial pH value and monomer concentration on the conductivity and morphology of the film were investigated. Results showed that SDS plays an important role to construct smooth conductive coating with several microns. The conductive RSF film shows a square resistance on the order of 105Ω or a conductivity on the order of 10-3 S/cm. This modification can be applied for RSF materials with various forms including fiber, film, foam, mats and 3D scaffolds. It is also possible to construct a microfluidic device with integrated conductive RSF channel for further applications of biosensor, tissue engineering and organic electronics.

K.FII.14
16:45
Authors : Despoina Paschou, Sungmyung Kang, Alice Taylor, Patrizia Ferretti and Richard B. Jackman
Affiliations : London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Electronic and Electrical and Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH, UK; UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guildford Street, London WC1N 1EH

Resume : Adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a novel type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are widely used for differentiation to tissues and cells such as bone and muscle. Up until recently, the most common type of MSCs for clinical application were Bone Marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Although BM-MSCs and ADSCs are similar in nature, ADSCs possess the superior capability of being easier to harvest: In the case of BM-MSCs, the procedure is more invasive and requires penetration of the hipbone. On the other hand, ADSCs can be obtained in a safer way and larger amounts, by using subcutaneous fat tissue. This makes them far more applicable in cases where invasive surgery is not an option, such as on infants and young children. ADSCs can differentiate into a range of cell types, such as bone, chondrocytes and neurons. Due to their accessibility, ADSCs are a particularly attractive solution for the correction of congenital defects, such as craniofacial defects using autologous grafts. Autologous grafts are of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, as they are mitigating the risk of rejection, because they are derived from the patients’ own body. In the past, the interaction between human Neural Stem Cells (hNSCs) and nanodiamonds (NDs) has been widely investigated by our team [1]. NDs possess great biocompatibility properties and they have been shown to interact particularly well with hNSCs. Early in vitro results have also shown significant compatibility with ADSCs. In proof-of-concept experiments, oxygen-terminated NDs have been shown to function as a more efficient environment for the proliferation and differentiation of ADSCs than other types of ND-based microenvironments, creating optimal conditions for the development of a range of tissues potentially both in-vitro and in-vivo. [1] Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells Alice C. Taylor, Barbora Vagaska, Robert Edgington, Clément Hébert, Patrizia Ferretti, Philippe Bergonzo and Richard B. Jackman J. Neural Eng. 12 (2015) 066016

K.FII.15
16:45
Authors : Yan Zhang, Brigitte Städler.
Affiliations : iNANO Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark e-mail: yanzhang@inano.au.dk

Resume : Live cells are the basic working units in the biological tissue, performing different functions as natures? microreactor. Assembly of sub-compartmentalized microreactors has become an important approach to mimic cells due to the structure similarity, ease of encapsulation of different subunits with multiple cargos, and the controllable activity initiation. With the aim to make artificial hepatocytes, we designed different sized microreactors with entrapped enzyme loaded liposomal subunits using droplet microfluidic or the layer-by-layer assembling technique. First, the synthetic partner particles or capsules were co-cultured with biological hepatocytes and successfully incorporated into the growing cell culture, forming bionic tissue with artificial and biological components. The surfaces of the particles or capsules coated with different polymers facilitated a beneficial biological response, i.e., the integration of the artificial and biological hepatocytes in a co-cultured tissue sheet as well as co-cultured cell tissue spheroids. The biological hepatocytes proliferation in the bionic tissue was assessed. Furthermore, detoxification, a key function of liver cells, was performed by loading the enzyme catalase, which can remove the cytotoxic compound hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), into the liposomal subunits of the artificial hepatocytes. The viability of hepatocytes in the bionic tissue was improved in the presence of active microreactors. These findings are a major step towards the beneficial combination of biological and synthetics entities with potential impact in regenerative medicine. Key words: cell mimicry, sub-compartmentalized microreactor, hepatocytes, detoxification, bionic tissue

K.FII.16
 
Young Investigator Forum. Poster Session : Organizers/Chairs-Federico Zen, PhD Student, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland & Valentine Blashchuk Bach D Student, TSN University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine . Supervisor Professor Dr. Manuela Schiek, University of Oldenburg, Germany
18:30
Authors : Donata Iandolo[1], Magali Ferro,[1] Charalampos Pitsalidis,[1] Sahika Inal,[2] Adel Hama,[1] Roisin Owens [1]
Affiliations : [1] Department of Bioelectronics, Centre Microélectronique de Provence, Gardanne, France. [2] Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, KAUST, Saudi Arabia.

Resume : One of the latest trends in the fields of tissue engineering as well as oncological research is the development of in vitro systems mimicking specific target tissues. In this way, models will be available that replicate the tridimensional structure and microenvironment experienced by cells in the target tissue more closely than the 2D systems employed so far. Interestingly, in addition to chemical and mechanical cues, certain tissues are known to be regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues. One such tissue is the bone. Indeed, it has been demonstrated to exhibit piezoelectric properties in vivo, generating electrical potential upon mechanical deformation and responding to electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation has been proven to sustain cell proliferation as well as to boost the expression of genes related to stem cells osteogenic differentiation. The device that will be developed will consist of 3D electroactive porous scaffolds allowing both electrical stimulation of stem cells and the analysis of the differentiation process towards bone-forming cells.

K.FPII.1
18:30
Authors : Ching-Wei Lin; Sergei M. Bachilo; Michael Vu; Kathleen M. Beckingham; R. Bruce Weisman
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry and the Smalley-Curl Institute, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA Department of Biosciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA

Resume : Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT?probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

K.FPII.2
18:30
Authors : Nadezda Lapshina1, Tamara Shostak1, Amir Handelman1, 2, Tal Ellenbogen1 and Gil Rosenman1
Affiliations : 1School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleishman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 2 Faculty of Engineering, Holon Institute of Technology, Holon, Israel

Resume : Bioinspired nanostructures demonstrate fundamental physical properties such as piezoelectric, nonlinear optical, electrooptical and optical waveguiding effects [1, 2]. This work is focused on a new phenomenon of a deep modification of electron-optical properties resulting in visible fluorescence of peptide triphenylalanine (FFF) nanoensembles folded into a beta-sheet secondary structure. Found two wide spectral bands of optical absorption and photonic emission in blue and green regions are attributed to a strong reduction of the energy gap of intermolecular hydrogen bonds of antiparallel beta-sheet supramolecular structures. Found intrinsic visible fluorescence in FFF-nanostructures is also observed in biological nanostructures of a different complexity from simple ultrashort aromatic and aliphatic di- , tri-peptides to long, containing dozens peptides, neurodegenerative amyloidogenic proteins [3] that allows to consider it as an optical signature of a fundamental biological beta-sheet biomolecular organization. It can be used both in bio-nano-photonics and medical diagnostics of protein misfolding diseases. The authors appreciate support of Ministry of Science, Technology & Space of Israel. [1] A. Handelman, S. Lavrov, A. Kudryavtsev, A. Khatchatouriants, Y. Rosenberg, E. Mishina and G. Rosenman, Nonlinear Optical Bioinspired Peptide Nanostructures. Adv. Optical Mater 1; 875-884 (2013) [2] A. Handelman, B. Apter, T. Shostak and G. Rosenman, Peptide Optical waveguides. J. Pept. Sci. (2016) [3] V. N. Uversky and Y. L. Lyubchenko, Bio-nanoimaging: protein misfolding and aggregation. Elsevier, UK, 2014.

K.FPII.3
18:30
Authors : Oliya S. Abdullaeva,(1) Frank Balzer,(2) Karim Habashy,(1) Matthias Schulz,(3) Jürgen Parisi,(1) Arne Lützen,(3), Karin Dedek,(1) Manuela Schiek.(1)
Affiliations : (1) University of Oldenburg; (2) University of Southern Denmark; (3) University of Bonn

Resume : In many blindness-causing diseases, photoreceptors degenerate whereas second order and projecting neurons are largely unaffected. Thus, one promising avenue to restore vision in affected patients is to develop artificial photoreceptors for retinal prosthetic devices [1]. Artificial photoreceptors based on organic semiconductors emerged as promising alternative for inorganic materials due to increased biocompatibility and the feasibility of direct optical stimulation [2]. We follow an electrophysiological patch clamp approach to conduct fundamental mechanistic studies on a model system, which consists of murine neuroblastoma (N2A) cells grown on a textured small molecular organic semiconductor thin film under physiological conditions. We have chosen a custom-made anilino-squaraine dye, shortly named SQIB, blended with a commercial fullerene as active layer of the artificial photoreceptor. Patch clamp recordings showed, that photoexcitation of the system with short light pulses, stimulated fast capacitive transmembrane currents in the N2A cells [3]. The electrical coupling between the artificial photoreceptor and the neuronal cells was fast and direct, but still was only of passive nature. To increase the capacitive coupling, we deposit an additional dielectric coating such as silicon dioxide onto the active layer. We conduct a systematic investigation of the impact of the dielectric coating on transient photocurrents within the electrolyte and the consequential transmembrane currents. Additionally, we monitor the stability of the modified artificial photoreceptor in physiological environment under illuminated conditions by atomic force microscopy. [1] L. Bareket-Keren, Y. Hanein, Int. J. Nanomed. 2014, 9: 65. [2] D. Ghezzi, et al., Nat. Photon. 2013, 7: 400. [3] O. S. Abdullaeva, M. Schulz, F. Balzer, J. Parisi, A. Lützen, K. Dedek, M. Schiek, Langmuir 2016, 32: 8533.

K.FPII.4
18:30
Authors : Camila Honorato-Rios, Jan Lagerwall
Affiliations : University of Luxembourg, Physics & Materials Science Research Unit, Experimental Soft Matter Physics Group

Resume : Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), nanorods produced by acid hydrolysis of cellulosic sources, are emerging as a new class of functional biomaterial. CNCs present a broad range of uses, for example in composites, cosmetics, security paper and medical devices [1]. The fascinating ability of CNCs to self-organize into a cholesteric liquid crystal phase, with a helical arrangement of the nanorods, is attracting substantial interest across different research fields [2]. It is important from an applied point of view since this arrangement gives a photonic band gap to the final dried CNC films, but also from a fundamental soft matter physics perspective, as many details of the CNC liquid crystal formation are far from being understood. A critical problem from an analytical, and likely also from an applied perspective, is the high length polydispersity of as-produced CNC samples. In this study, we introduce a method for fractionating the CNC nanorods, utilizing the spontaneous phase separation between isotropic and liquid crystalline phases, allowing us to narrow down the length distribution. The aspect ratio (length/diameter) has a strong effect on the period of the cholesteric helix, affecting the iridescent colors appearing in dried CNC films. We believe that a reduced polydispersity will allow us to better control the color of the finally dispersed films, compared to the natural polydisperse samples that are now being used in the community. We present how this affects the self-assembly process, and consequently the color formation in such bio-derived structural films. [1] J.H. Park et al., ChemPhysChem, 15, 7, pp. 1477-1484 (2014) [2] Lagerwall, J. P. F. et al. Cellulose nanocrystal-based materials: from liquid crystal self-assembly and glass formation to multifunctional thin films. NPG Asia Mater. 6, e80 (2014).

K.FPII.5
18:30
Authors : O. Deschaume (1), S. Abakumov (1-2), O. Korculanin (1-2), C. Bartic(1) and M. P. Lettinga (1-2)
Affiliations : (1) Soft matter Physics and Biophysics unit, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D - box 2416, 3001 Leuven, Belgium, olivier.deschaume@kuleuven.be; (2) Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Complex Systems (ICS-3), 52425 Jülich, Germany

Resume : In nature, layered composite materials such as nacre are self-assembled from proteins and inorganic building blocks. Synthetic layered composites mimic some of the properties of nacre, but they are mostly prepared through layer-by-layer deposition, a lengthy approach for bulk materials preparation. New and faster assembly routes may be developed by taking advantage of the liquid crystalline behavior of colloidal suspensions. We combine gibbsite platelets with filamentous viruses, used extensively in materials science [1] and soft matter Physics as models for plates and rods forming colloidal liquid crystals [2]. The behavior of rod/plate mixtures explored here has only been studied in very few cases. We first ensure that the interactions between the particles are purely entropic, by modifying gibbsite particles surface to avoid electrostatic assembly with viruses. Using differential dynamic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy we obtain the dynamics of both systems independently and show how it depends on the ordering of the system [3]. The morphology and mechanical properties of obtained films are studied at nanoscale by means of atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate different cases of virus/platelet organization on surfaces and in thin films. [1] Cao, B. et al. Acc. Chem. Res. 2016, 49, 1111–1120. [2] Kirchenbuechler, I. et al. Nat. Commun. 2014, 5, 5060. [3] Lewis, A. H. et al. Soft Matter 2014, 10, 7865–7873.

K.FPII.6
18:30
Authors : Ioanna Savva 1, Theodora Krasia-Christoforou 1, Ivo Safarik 2-3, Kristyna Pospiskova 3, Eva Baldikova 2
Affiliations : 1 University of Cyprus, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 75 Kallilopeos Avenue, P.O.Box 20537, 1678, Nicosia, CYPRUS; 2 Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic; 3 Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc, Czech Republic; * Corresponding author’s e-mail address: joan.savva@gmail.com

Resume : Magnetically-modified (nano)fibers produced by electrospinning attract high attention in various areas of medicine, biosciences and biotechnology. This study deals with the developing of polyvinyl pyrrolidone/chitosan (PVP/CS) crosslinked electrospun fibrous platforms and their further modification by employing a post-magnetization process (i.e. the chemical co-precipitation method) for introducing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (FexOy NPs) onto their surfaces. These materials were characterized in regards to their composition, morphology, and thermal properties by XRD, SEM, TEM and TGA. The resulting magnetic electrospun fibrous (nano)textile were further evaluated as magnetoactive substrates for the immobilization of microbial cells, enzymes and low-molecular-weight affinity ligands. Acknowledgements The research was supported by the projects LD14075 and LO1305 (Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic) and the University of Cyprus Grant “Post-doctoral Researchers” supporting Dr. I. Savva. We are also grateful to Dr Eugenia Vasile (University Politehnica of Bucharest) for the TEM measurements.

K.FPII.7
18:30
Authors : M. Paez-Perez, O. Ces, S. Howorka
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry - Imperial College London; Department of Chemistry - Imperial College London; Department of Chemistry - University College London

Resume : Membrane proteins contribute to a number of crucial roles such as transport, mechano-regulation or signal transduction. For this reason, engineered proteins interacting with the cell membrane are expected to offer novel added functionalities. However, current protein engineering strategies often take considerably long time and show difficult tunability, making this process difficult to scale up and hindering the use of high throughput approaches. However, it seems DNA nanotechnology could overcome this issue. Although the use of free DNA as vaccination method has been reported, there is little research concerning its interaction with lipid membranes. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that lipid-decorated DNA structures can bind to and penetrate lipid bilayers. Hence, we will exploit the tunability of water-soluble DNA nanostructures to explore how their interaction with lipid membranes differs according to their shape and functionalization. By using a fluorescent readout, we expect to elucidate how we can tune the degree of binding and penetration of these constructs. If successful, our results could be extrapolated to protein engineering, enabling faster paces and allowing a high throughput approach. Furthermore, the use of DNA nanostructures for replicating membrane proteins could be assessed, potentially enabling the creation of novel therapies.

K.FPII.8
18:30
Authors : Julio Gutierrez Moreno1-2, Dimitris G. Papageorgiou 2, Georgios A. Evangelakis 3, Christina E. Lekka 2
Affiliations : 1 Tyndall National Instute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork, Ireland 2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, 45110 Greece 3 Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, 45110 Greece

Resume : In this work, we present a systematic ab initio study on the structural, electronic and mechanical properties of Ti-xNb (x < 35at%) alloys. This necessity is originated from the currently used Ti-6Al-4V implants that consist of cytotoxic elements and exhibit higher Young’s modulus (E~112GPa) compared to a bone (E < 30GPa), resulting in bone atrophy and implant loosening. Our results predict a variety of phases (including ω, α’, α’’ and β) depending on the Nb concentration, in agreement with previous works. The α′ and ω are favorable for Ti-xNb (x ≤ 6.25%at), the β phase is stable at high Nb compositions (x ≥ 18.75at%) while the α″ phase may form in intermediate concentrations. The α′ and ω hexagonal phases become unstable at high Nb content due to the electronic band filling at the Fermi level (EF), while in the cubic β-Ti-25 at%Nb the depletion of the occupied electronic states at EF results in a stable β-TiNb structure. Our results exhibit the Eω > Eα′ > Εα″ > Εβ sequence, revealing the importance of the phases coexistence for the E reduction. The Young’s modulus surface revealed high anisotropic E values for all Ti-Nb phases, while the Eβ along the [100] direction exhibits an E under 30GPa suggesting the importance of a Ti-Nb single-crystal growth for the design of low rigidity alloys. These results could enlighten the electronic origin of the Ti-Nb phase stability and thus be used for the design of novel alloys suitable for biomedical applications.

K.FPII.9
18:30
Authors : Nirmalya Tripathy, Rafiq Ahmad, Jeong Eun Song, Hyun Park, Gilson Khang
Affiliations : Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Department of PolymerNano Science & Polymer BIN Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, 54896 Republic of Korea School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Nanomaterials Processing Research, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, 54896 Republic of Korea

Resume : Nanoparticles are being increasingly recognized due to their potential utility in various sectors including nanomedicine. Herein, we have demonstrated a new strategy to synthesize multifunctional GO-wrapped ZnO nanoparticles (GO-ZnO nanohybrid) for targeting photodynamic therapy (PDT) under visible light irradiation. Folic acid (FA), a targeting agent toward cancer cells, was conjugated onto graphene oxide (GO) via imide linkage. The nanohybrids have shown pronounced improvement in tumor targeting, which has been demonstrated by MTT and cellular uptake assay. Due to the high electrical conductivity of GO, the interaction between GO and ZnO, and the inhibition of aggregation, the hybrid of GO-FA and ZnO significantly enhances the photodynamic activity, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation under visible light irradiation. The study presents a novel tumor targeting photosensitizer and a promising strategy in PDT for cancer treatment.

K.FPII.10
18:30
Authors : A. Al-Kattan(1), Y. Raybchikov(1), T. Baati(1), M.-A. Estève(2), M. Sentis(1), D. Braguer(2) and A. V. Kabashin(1)
Affiliations : (1) Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, Campus de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 917, 13288, Marseille Cedex 9. (2) Aix-Marseille Université, INSERM, CRO2 UMR 911, Faculté de Pharmacie, 13385, Marseille Cedex 5.

Resume : Based-on Silicon element widely distributed in mammalian tissues, bare laser-synthesized Si nanoparticles (Si-NPs) appear promising tools for biomedical tasks. Here, we employ ultra-short laser method in aqueous solution to elaborate extremely stable colloidal Si-NPs solutions. The nanoparticles appear spherical with low size distribution ranging from few nm to tens of nm. Structural analysis evidences that Si-NPs are composed of Si nanocrystals surrounding with thin layer of SiOx (1≤x≤2) and exhibiting a negative charge surface of -35 mV ± 0.10. Moreover, by monitoring the amount of dissolved oxygen into the synthesis medium, we report a dependence of the dissolution rate of NPs in aqueous environment on the presence of oxidation-induced defects in the core of Si-NPs. By examining the interaction of bare Si-NPs with human cells after 72 h of incubation at different concentrations, we report no adverse effects up to high concentrations (50 µg/mL) and a good internalization via classical endocytosis mechanism. In addition, intravenous administration of Si-NPs using small animal model reveal any toxicity confirmed by behavior of mice, histological analysis and other key biochemical parameters. These encouraging results open exciting perspectives to develop bare laser-synthesized Si NPs as promising platforms in nanomedicine.

K.FPII.11
18:30
Authors : Leana Travaglini, Federica Fiorini, Giuseppe Alonci, Pietro Riva, Silvana Perretta, Luisa De Cola
Affiliations : Leana Travaglini, Federica Fiorini, Giuseppe Alonci, Luisa De Cola Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, ISIS UMR 7006, 8 allée Gaspard MongeF-67000 Strasbourg, France Luisa De Cola Institut fur Nanotechnologie (INT) - Building 640, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany Pietro Riva, Silvana Perretta IHU Strasbourg, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Place de l?Hôpital 1, 67091 Strasbourg, France

Resume : Hydrogels have been extensively investigated for biomedical applications and tissue engineering. Their biocompatibility and resemblance with living tissues make them ideal materials to be applied in drug delivery, biosensing and as scaffolds for cell growth.[1-4] Notably, the possibility to introduce various functional groups into the polymeric network provides wide scope for tuning the hydrogel properties, obtaining smart biomaterials. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine-based hydrogels with equilibrium water content (EWC) up to 96%. The properties of the material were tuned by varying reaction conditions, such as pH and the relative concentrations of monomers, obtaining hydrogels with improved swelling properties. In vitro and ex vivo tests assessed their efficacy as adhesive sealants for gastrointestinal fistulas. Our injectable hydrogels could pave the way to endoscopic non-invasive procedures for fistula treatment. Further experiments are still in progress to optimize the properties of these scaffolds and to explore their biocompatibility.

K.FPII.12
18:30
Authors : Hong Joo An, Na Rae Kim, Min Eui Lee, Hyeon Ji Yoon, Jun Ho Choe, Young Soo Yun, Hyoung-Joon Jin
Affiliations : Hong Joo An; Na Rae Kim; Min Eui Lee; Hyeon Ji Yoon; Jun Ho Choe; Hyoung-Joon Jin Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea Young Soo Yun Department of Chemical Engineering, Kangwon National University, Samcheok 245-711, South Korea

Resume : Packaging materials that cover or protect products to prevent deformation or spoiling have received much attention in polymer science and engineering fields over the last several decades. The recent increase in environmental concerns has demanded replacing conventional petroleum-derived plastics with alternative packaging materials based on bio-resources. Thus, diverse biopolymers such as poly(lactic acid), poly(hydroxy acid), and polycaprolactone have been widely investigated as eco-friendly packaging materials. Silk, a natural biopolymer, has been utilized in textile and biotechnological applications because of its exceptional mechanical and bio-relative properties. In addition, silk can be easily formed into mechanically robust films with excellent surface qualities (surface roughness rms <5 nm), high transparency (>90% transmission in the visible range), and good chemical resistance properties. Thus, silk is a good candidate for packaging material. However, the harsh conditions required for its regeneration deteriorate the crystal structure of silk films, resulting in insufficient barrier properties for practical use. In this work, we prepared silk/cellulose nanocrystal (CN) composite films containing different CN loadings and investigated the changes of crystal structure according to the incorporation of rod-like nanoparticles with exceptional strength and modulus, as well as the mechanical and barrier properties of the composite films.

K.FPII.13
18:30
Authors : Bistaffa, M.J.; Souza, P.S.S.; Toledo, K.A.; Aoki, P.H.B.
Affiliations : Faculdade de Ciencias e Letras, UNESP Univ Estadual Paulista, Assis, SP, Brazil 19806-900

Resume : Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has proven to be a promising alternative for treating different types of cancers. The preferential sites of photodynamic action are the cell membranes, but the underlying mechanisms involved in membrane lipid oxidation are not fully understood. In order to investigate these mechanisms, suitable methods are required not only to mimic the cell membrane but also to obtain specific molecular information. Langmuir monolayers of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were applied here as cellular membrane mimetic systems to unravel the adsorption mechanisms of the photosensitizer erythrosin towards the membrane and the molecular-level effects that follow lipid oxidation. It was found that erythrosin adsorbs to the monolayer driven by attractive electrostatic interactions with the choline groups of both DOPC and DPPC. Upon irradiation, the modifications of DOPC monolayers are consistent with the hydroperoxidation process. Nevertheless, low levels of cytotoxicity were found in PDT experiments with in vitro culture of cells derived from oropharyngeal cancer (HEp-2), incubated with different concentrations (10-3 – 10-6 mol/L) of erythrosin in dark. Ongoing experiments of cytotoxicity upon irradiation have shown promising results in terms of photo-induced cell death, revealing the potential of erythrosin as photosensitizer in PDT applications.

K.FPII.14
18:30
Authors : Hyeon Ji Yoon, Soo Min Jung, Hong Joo An, Jun Ho Choe, Na Rae Kim, Min Eui Lee, and Hyoung-Joon Jin*
Affiliations : Hyeon Ji Yoo; Soo Min Jung; Hong Joo An; Jun Ho Choe; Na Rae Kim; Min Eui Lee; Hyoung-Joon Jin* Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea

Resume : With increasing environmental awareness, biopolymers from renewable resources such as poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), polycaprolactone, poly(hydroxy acid), and poly(lactic acid) have attracted much attention as replacements for conventional petroleum-based synthetic plastics. However, the practical use of these biopolymers is limited by their insufficient performance and relatively high cost as compared to those of petroleum-derived plastics. The preparation of composites with nanomaterials has been proposed as an alternative method to enhance the material properties of biopolymers. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNs), which are rod-like nanoparticles, are one of the most promising reinforcements in bio-nanocomposite materials because of their renewable nature, as well as their exceptionally high specific strength and modulus, low density, chemical tunability, and low cost. However, the number of hydroxyl groups in CNs makes it difficult to achieve acceptable dispersion levels of nanofillers in the nonpolar plastic matrix. In the present study, we performed surface modification of CNs by the acetylation method in order to enhance dispersion and we prepared PBS/CN nanocomposites. The influence of the CN loading level (from 0.1 to 1) and the degree of substitution (from 0.04 to 2.77) on the microstructure and morphology, as well as on the mechanical properties and biodegradability of the nanocomposites, was investigated.

K.FPII.15
18:30
Authors : L. Zajickova, E. Kedronova, V. Kupka, L. Vojtova, M. Michlicek, E. Tihlarikova, V. Nedela, J. Schafer
Affiliations : CEITEC Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; CEITEC Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Institute of Scientific Instruments, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic; Institute of Scientific Instruments, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic; INP Greifswald, Germany

Resume : The electrospinning was employed for preparation of nanofibrous membranes that have high potential application in tissue engineering. Nanofibers were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The used polymer solution with various ratios of PCL:PEG polymers ranging from 5:95 to 75:25 influenced the structure, mechanical properties and biodegradability of the nanofibers. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that by changing the PCL:PEG ratio in the original solution, the chemical composition and thus also properties of final electrospun polymer varied. Already a small addition of PCL improved the mechanical properties significantly although the degradation in water resembled rather the results for PEG material. In order to improve the biocompatibility of the nanofibers a thin amine layer by means of the cyclopropylamine plasma polymerization in radio frequency capacitively coupled discharge was deposited on prepared nanofibrous membranes. The presence of the amine groups is supposed to enhance the adhesion and proliferation of the cells, thus enhancing the properties of nanofibers for biomedical applications. The coating of nanofibers by a thin amine film resulted also in slight modification of mechanical properties and improved water stability of PEG-like membranes.

K.FPII.16
18:30
Authors : Byung Hoon Jo, Jeong Hyun Seo, Yun Jung Yang, Kyungjoon Baek, Yoo Seong Choi, Seung Pil Pack, Sang Ho Oh, Hyung Joon Cha
Affiliations : Division of Life Science and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University; School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University; Department of Chemical Engineering, POSTECH; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, POSTECH; Department of Chemical Engineering, Chungnam National University; Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Korea University; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, POSTECH; Department of Chemical Engineering, POSTECH

Resume : This study reports on the development and characterization of a carbonic anhydrase (CA)-based biocatalyst encapsulated in a biosilica matrix for use in CO2 sequestration. Encapsulation occurred simultaneously with autonomous silica synthesis by silica-condensing R5 peptide that was fused to recombinant CA. The encapsulation efficiency was greater than 95%, and the encapsulated CA was not leached from the silica matrix, demonstrating the highly efficient R5-mediated auto-encapsulation process. The catalytic efficiency for CO2 hydration was pH dependent, suggesting that proton transfer from silica to water is a rate limiting step for the fast catalysis. In addition to good reusability, the encapsulated CA exhibited outstanding thermostability, retaining 80% activity after 5 days at 50˚C. The thermoactivity was also remarkable, showing ~10-fold higher activity at 60˚C compared to that at 25˚C. The physical structure was observed to be highly compact with a low surface area, stressing the importance of the outermost surface for catalytic performance. We also demonstrated the applicability of the silica nanoparticle to the sequestration of CO2 in carbonate minerals. The rate of CaCO3 precipitation was remarkably accelerated by the encapsulated biocatalyst. Thus, this silica-CA nanocomposite, efficiently synthesized via a biomimetic green route, can be successfully used as a robust biocatalyst for biomimetic sequestration of the greenhouse gas CO2.

K.FPII.17
18:30
Authors : Si-Hao Qian, Yong He, Bo Zhu
Affiliations : Si-Hao Qian, State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials& College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Yong He, Center for Aviation Composites, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China.

Resume : Bioelectronic devices have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diverse medical fields such as the bionic ear and brain-computer interface. Electrode between the biotic and abiotic worlds has been demonstrated to be the most important part of these devices. However, implanting electrode inside the nervous system often incurs inflammatory response, which will lead to fibrous encapsulation, cutting off the connection between electrodes and electro-active cells and increasing the electrical impedance of the bioelectronics interface. Consequently, there is a high expectation for electrode coating of low impedance, high selectivity, high resolution and long-term stability. In early research, we have successfully developed a biomimetic conducting polymer film to facilitate a selective interaction to neural cells.1 However, the recording site is not the only part of an implanted electrode. The Insulating layer occupies the most part of the electrode, which plays very important role in the biocompatibility of the whole electrode. Therefore, we synthesized a protein/cell resistant poly(p-xylylene) thin film for the dielectric barrier. The design of bionic insulation significantly reduces the nonspecific adhesion of proteins/cells. We further integrated the biomimetic PEDOT derivatives with the bionic insulating material to fabricate an electrode array of all biomimicking polymers. We demonstrated that the feature of all biomimicking design ensures not noly a excellent proteins/cells resistance for the whole electrode but also a selective electrical interfacing of recording sites to neural cells. Reference: 1. B. Zhu, S.-C. Luo, H. Zhao, H.-A. Lin, J. Sekine, A. Nakao, C. Chen, Y. Yamashita and H.-h. Yu, Nature communications, 2014, 5.

K.FPII.18
18:30
Authors : Stephen J. Lyons, Dermot Brougham, Aoife Morrin.
Affiliations : Stephen J. Lyons, School of Chemical Sciences, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Ireland; Dermot Brougham, School of Chemistry, University College Dublin; Aoife Morrin, School of Chemical Sciences, INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Ireland.

Resume : At present, superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles are being used in a variety of biomedical applications in order to facilitate both laboratory-based diagnostics, as well as therapeutic and diagnostic applications in-vivo, e.g., localised drug delivery. This is due to their high magnetic susceptibility, biocompatibility and tuneable characteristics. In this research, SPM iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are being applied in the development of a non-invasive method for protein biomarker detection in interstitial environments. The extracellular matrix (ECM), which is situated beneath the skin, contains a wide variety of compounds, fluids and proteins. The interstitial fluid within this matrix is understood to contain a wealth of biomarkers at concentrations ranges significantly higher than that in blood. (1) Thus, it is of increasing interest to develop new approaches to diagnostics for interstitial fluid given it can be accessed in a minimally-invasive manner and is known to contain a host of biomarkers. (2) Hence, the goal of this research is to establish a method to characterise the NP motion under magnetic field in viscous media (where viscosity ranges are similar to that of the ECM), and use this method to elucidate the factors that affect rates of NP velocity. In this research, an agarose hydrogel is employed as the viscous media. The movement of NPs under magnetic field through this media is monitored using an imaging technique. The primary forces influencing magnetic NP mobility in a biological system are the drag force (FD) and the external magnetic force (FM). It is critical to have stable, mono-disperse and biocompatible NPs, whose presence in-vivo does not generate an immune response and whose movement through the ECM can be controlled using an external magnetic field. Thus, the influence of core size and surface coating chemistry on mobility and stability in viscous media is investigated using our method. This presentation will highlight key results towards the development of functional NPs for potential biotargeting applications in the future. References: (1) Pavel Gromov, Irina Gromova, Charlotta J. Olsen, Vera Timmermans-Wielenga, Mai-Lis Talman, Reza R. Serizawa, José M.A. Moreira. (2013). Tumor interstitial fluid ? A treasure trove of cancer biomarkers. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1834 (1), p2259?2270. (2) Sam J. Kuhn, Dennis E. Hallahan, and Todd D. Giorgio. (2006). Characterization of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Interactions with Extracellular Matrix in an in Vitro System. Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 34 (1), p51-58.

K.FPII.19
18:30
Authors : Ping Hong Lin1, Liren Tsai1*,Shih-Han Wang2
Affiliations : 1National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Department of Mechanical Engineering 2National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering

Resume : Bone losses often happens in aging population. Serious bone losses could resulted in various complicated damages, and orthopedic implant becomes inevitably. Metal materials were commonly used in artificial substitutes and human body assembly parts. Although currently many metal materials have clinical success for implant, there are many factors for the reliability of implants which includes wear, fatigue failure and corrosion. Careful selection of alloying additions when design new alloys for biomedicine can improve properties of corrosion, increased strength and wear resistance, decreased Young's modulus, etc. In this research, Ti-based metallic glasses were studied. The materials were melted then passed through a mold Rod size of about 3 ~ 6 mm were produced. The surface morphology and lattice structure of the alloying elements were observed by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic tensile and static mechanical properties of Ti-based bulk metallic glass materials were investigated by means of a Brazilian disc method (BD) using a material testing system and a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, respectively. The mechanical and mechanical properties of the materials were mainly tensile strength and strain and stress. Dynamic and static fracture process of the Ti-based bulk metallic glasses at various loading rates was measured. Ti-based metal glass has a lower Young's modulus than human bone and high strength properties and good corrosion resistance; it has great potential as human bone implant material.

K.FPII.20
18:30
Authors : Sori Lee, Gyoyeon Hwang, Haeleen Hong, Jiyeon Lee and Tae-il Kim
Affiliations : M.A.Sc. candidate in Biomedical Engineering Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), School of Chemical Engineering Suwon 440-746, Korea Tel: +82 10 6819 4010 Email: lovelylsr@skku.edu

Resume : Stent is an essential medical device to prolong survival when plaque blocks body conduits or tubular organ. However, a conventional bare-metal stent (BMS) has been faced with restenosis problem caused by tissue hyperplasia secondary to BMS placements. Drug-eluting stent (DES) has been introduced to lower rate of restenosis. Especially reservoir-based DES has attracted lots of attention due to advantages of high capacity and uniformity of drugs. However, it is hard to fabricate reservoir structure with simple and time-efficient process. In addition to DES, to treat restenosis, controlling of the cell behavior that interact with implanted bio-devices has been also considered as desirable strategy because there is a need to limit the adhesion and viability of cells on stent. In order to effectively inhibit restenosis, we suggest multifunctional DES combined physically cell repellent approach with drug treatment using nanoturf structure. An ultraviolet (UV)-curable polysiloxane acrylate (PSA) is used to fabricate multifunctional nanostructure using two consecutive steps: UV induced polymerization and reactive ion etching (RIE) with time-efficient process because it demands only a few minute to fabricate. We elucidate tumor cell-repellent property by showing reduced focal adhesion and monitor number of attached tumor cells on the nanoturf structures compared with flat surface while maintaining biocompatibility. Furthermore, we showed the possibility of localized drug elution via near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. Our study has a great potentials to widen other biomedical implants that use a surface needed to control cell behavior and release a drug

K.FPII.21
18:30
Authors : V.Blashchuk1, D.Karpenko3, O.Ivanyuta1, N.Tsierkezos2, U.Ritter2, P.Scharff2, E.Buzaneva1
Affiliations : 1Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Faculty of RadioPhysics Electronics and Computer Systems, Volodymyrska Str. 64/13, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine, 2Institute for Chemistry and Biotechnology, 98684, Ilmenau, Germany, PF 100565; 3 NTU of Ukraine ?KPI?, Politechnichna14, 03056, Kyiv-56,Ukraine

Resume : The design concept to create the stimuli responsive photoactive at visible range carbon tubes nanostructures is based on constructed molecular models for the photoemission of semiconductor carbon nanotubes (CNT’s) functionalized by attached to the core and ends photoactive molecular complexes: metal (d - transition metal Cu) - organic (azole ligand) complex or by this complexe with coordinative bonded biomolecule (histidine). The tubes are the building blocks for nanostructures organization due to bonds between the metal ions and the ligands or the histidine molecules at different tubes. The architecture (SEM images) and the photoemission (PL spectroscopy) for nanostructures from these functionalized MWCNT in adsorbed layer at silicon substrate are characterized. The SEM images for this layer are interpreted using proposed molecular architectures models for building blocks connected through Cu2+ with attached two ligands molecules at different tubes cores and these bonds are partially retain in the complexes with coordinative bonded histedine molecules that can decrease formation of these structures due to their adsorbing on tubes. These layers with namely one and both two types of nanostructures are characterized by photoemission wide bands, having different intensities and different three subbands in visible range

K.FPII.22
18:30
Authors : Sungmyung Kang, Alice C. Taylor, Richard B. Jackman
Affiliations : London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Electronic and Electrical and Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH, UK.

Resume : To learn more about neurological diseases such as stroke, Parkinson’s and dementia, it is of upmost importance that neuronal behaviour and electrical activity of 3D neural networks is understood. Present electrophysiological techniques using 2D microelectrode arrays (MEAs) allow for extracellular recording of non–specific collections of neurons. 3D electrodes are highly desirable as they allow for a better electrode–neural interface, with a larger surface area and the ability to record from within the cell. Current optimisation of MEAs is ongoing, and devices, which are able to facilitate location traced simultaneous recording and stimulation of large populations of individual neurons, are required. Boron–doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown to be an attractive choice of material for neural interfacing due to the low impedance, high capacitance and biocompatibility observed[1], [2]. Here at UCL, CNT growth, which is performed in a DC plasma CVD process, is optimised in order to produce both patterns of vertically aligned and individual CNTs for intra–cellular recording application. Since combining individual BNCD coated CNT electrodes with 3D hydrogels is planned, controlled location and size of CNTs is desired. Therefore, we have developed recipes in which specific dimensions of CNTs can be grown, followed by diamond coating. [1] G. Piret, C. Hebert, J. P. Mazellier, L. Rousseau, E. Scorsone, M. Cottance, G. Lissorgues, M. O. Heuschkel, S. Picaud, P. Bergonzo, and B. Yvert, “3D-nanostructured boron-doped diamond for microelectrode array neural interfacing,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 53, pp. 173–183, Jun. 2015. [2] A. C. Taylor, B. Vagaska, R. Edgington, C. Hebert, P. Ferretti, P. Bergonzo, and R. B. Jackman, “Biocompatibility of nanostructured boron doped diamond for the attachment and proliferation of human neural stem cells,” J. Neural Eng., vol. 12, no. 6, p. 066016, Dec. 2015.

K.FPII.23
 
POSTER SESSION. Smart stimuli responsive nanomaterials : Chair: Dr. Emanuela Gatto, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
18:40
Authors : F. Balzer, A. Lützen, M. Schiek
Affiliations : Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, DK-6400 Sønderborg, Denmark; Kekulé Institute for Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bonn, Gerhard-Domagk-Str.1, D-53121 Bonn, Germany; Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg, Germany

Resume : Self-assembled nanotubes and nanofibers from organic molecules such as peptides have many possible applications in biomedicine [1]. In this paper, uniaxially aligned epitaxial nanofibers from semiconducting para-quaterphenylenes are investigated. They are formed by self-assembly after vacuum deposition. These nanofibers have already been applied for organic electronics, but can serve as active and passive templates for biological uses. Functionalization controls many of their properties [2,3]. Methoxy- and cyano-functionalization are of special interest due to the asymmetric charge distribution. Here, nanofibers from in the 4,4’’’ positions cyano- and methoxy-functionalized para-quaterphenylenes (CNP4, CNHP4, MOP4) on muscovite mica and HOPG are studied. Thin-film phases are identified by X-ray diffraction. Their optical properties, their morphology, and their electric surface potential with and without illumination differ, reflecting different polymorphs, facets, and contact faces. REFERENCES. [1] I.W. Hamley, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 6866-6881 (2014). [2] F. Balzer, Ch. Röthel, H.-G. Rubahn, A. Lützen, J. Parisi, R. Resel, M. Schiek, J. Phys. Chem. C 120, 7653-7661 (2016). [3] F. Balzer, M. Schulz, A. Lützen, M. Schiek, Soft Matter 12, 9297-9302 (2016).

K.PII.1
18:40
Authors : Dr. Emanuela GATTO,1 Ilaria Iacoboni,1 Ian W. Hamley2 and Mariano Venanzi1
Affiliations : 1 Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata“, 00133 Rome, Italy; 2 Department of Chemistry, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AD, United Kingdom

Resume : Optical properties of biomolecules have been extensively investigated for many decades in order to find intrinsic optical biomarkers. Recently, intrinsic fluorescence has been found in a variety of bioinspired peptide nanostructures [1-3]. In this work we report on the aggregation properties of an amphiphilic peptide, the (Ala)10-(His)6, denoted in the following as A10H6, by AFM and fluorescence measurements. We found that this peptide is able to form amyloid-like fibrils above a critical aggregation concentration[4]. Interestingly, by fluorescence microscopy measurements we observed an intrinsic fluorescence of these supramolecular peptide nanostructures in the visible range. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements have been performed in solution at different A10H6 peptide concentrations and using different solvents, in order to correlate the measured fluorescence intensity to the aggregation process and to the morphology of the nanostructures obtained. The possibility to obtain intrinsic fluorescence from peptide nanostructures would pave the way to develop a new generation of bio-inspired optoelectronic nanomaterials for nanophotonic applications. REFERENCES. [1] Del Mercato L. L., Pompa P., Maruccio G., Della Torre A., Sabella S., Tamburro A. M., Cingolani R., Rinaldi R. PNAS 104, 18019-18024 (2007). [2] Chan F. T. S., Kaminski Schierie G. S., Kumita J. R., Bertoncini C. W., Dobson C. M., Kaminski C. F. Analyst 138, 2156-2162 (2013). [3] Handelman A., Kuritz N., Natan A., Rosenman G. Langmuir 32, 2847–2862 (2016). [4] Hamley I. W., Kirkham S., Dehsorkhi A., Castelletto V., Adamcik J., Mezzenga R., Ruokolainen J., Mazzuca C., Gatto E., Venanzi M., Placidi E., Bilalis P., Iatrou H. Biomacromolecules 15, 3412−3420 (2014).

K.PII.2
18:40
Authors : E. Gatto,a R. Lettieri,a A. Colella,a F. Leonelli,b L. Stella,a M. Venanzi.a
Affiliations : a Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy b Dipartimento di Biologia Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Roma, Italy

Resume : Supported lipid membranes represent an elegant way to design smart fluid biointerfaces able to mimic the physico-chemical properties of biological membranes, providing an excellent model system for studying the surface chemistry of the cell. Furthermore, supported lipid membranes are accessible to a wide variety of surface-specific analytical techniques, providing smart biointerfaces for biotechnological applications,1 such as the design of chemical and biomedical sensors. In this contribution we describe a new lipid-based sensor for the detection of the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) enzyme, one of the most known biological markers of solid tumors. This enzyme promotes tumor growth and metastasis and is overexpressed in the presence of cancers, so that also its blood levels increase.2 To achieve this goal, one of the most used anticancer drugs, i.e. the pyrimidine analogue 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)3 has been properly functionalized with a C-12 aliphatic chain in order to be inserted into gold supported lipid membranes. The interaction of TP with the 5-FU inhibitor and its derivatives has been firstly evaluated in solution by fluorescence measurements, then the derivatives have been inserted into a lipid bilayer linked to a gold surface. The supported lipid biointerfaces have been characterized by ellipsometry, AFM and electrochemical techniques. The TP interaction with the substrate has been quantitatively evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance, following the oscillation frequency of the QCM crystal, making this system a very promising sensor for the detection of TP concentration in blood. REFERENCES. 1Castellana, E. T.; Creme, P. S. Solid supported lipid bilayers: From biophysical studies to sensor design. Surface Science Reports 61, 429–444 (2006). 2Haraguchi, M.; Komota, K.; Akashi, A.; Furui, J.; Kanematsu, T. Occurrence of hematogenous metastasis and serum levels of thymidine phosphorylase in colorectal cancer. Oncol. Rep. 10, 1207-1212 (2003). 3Malet-Martino, M.; Martino, R. Clinical studies of three oral prodrugs of 5-fluorouracil (capecitabine, UFT, S-1): a review. The Oncologist 7, 288-323 (2002).

K.PII.3
18:40
Authors : O.Ivanyuta 1, E.Gogotsi 2, O .Kysil 3, U.Ritter 4, P.Scharff 4 and E.Buzaneva 1
Affiliations : 1 - Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine; 2- IPMS NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine; 3-Institute of Biohysics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine; 4- TU Ilmenau, Institut fur Chemie und Biotechnology,Ilmenau, Germany.

Resume : The design and optical characterization of the protein amino - acids is key for understanding of the amino-acids molecules behaviour as basis sequences of biological macromolecules ( proteins) and their using as photoactive molecules, for example, in cell level biomaterials or advanced photovoltaic systems for an energy sources [1]. Therefore, we have started to design amino-acids molecules and have studied classic models for light excited electron transition through LUMO-HOMO band gap for the molecules and discuss ones using theories for LUMO-HOMO band gap formation for these molecules having different confirmations [2]. Then we selected amino-acidmolecule for studies by the PL spectroscopy taking in account that we can use the laser with 408 nm wavelength (3.3 eV) for experiments. The cysteine PL excited by the laser with wavelength 408 nm (3.3 eV) is characterized by the band in 1.5- 2.7 eV range. This band includes subbands that are centered at 2.04, 2.24 and 2.4 eV. The present of subbands are explained by the dependence on the conformation of the molecule geometry in the cysteine layer of the HOMO-LUMO value as it is found due to comparison of these subbands with calculations of electronic excitations of the cysteine conformers [2]. Therefore it is possible to use light excited electron transitions in the cysteine layer with different molecule geometry in photonic systems. 1. Koo, Suk Tai Chang, Joseph M. Slocik, Rajesh R. Naik and Orlin D. Velev, Aqueous soft matter based photovoltaic devices, J. Mater. Chem., 2011. 2. R.Maul, M. Preuss, F. Ortmann, K. Hannewald, and F. Bechstedt, Electronic Excitations of Glycine, Alanine, and Cysteine Conformers from First-Principles Calculations, J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, p.4370-4377.

K.PII.4
18:40
Authors : Neng Yu,Tony cass,Joshua Edel
Affiliations : department of chemistry, imperial college london

Resume : Single-molecule detection(SMD) is a novel technique by which signals and activities of individual molecules can be captured and perceived in real time. Apart from using biological nanopores and inorganic solid-state nanopores, quartz nanopipettes have more striking features—entirely signal read-out, simple fabrication and commercial production in SMD. However, it is quite hard to detect small molecules like proteins using nanopipettes due to large tip diameters. So in this project, a Y-shaped DNA-aptamer complex is fabricated to attach to target proteins. In this way, the signals of the whole aptamer-protein complex could be distinguished during translocation.

K.PII.5
18:40
Authors : Maria Vorobets, George Vorobets
Affiliations : Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University

Resume : Nitrogen compounds (NH3, NH4 +) and sulfur oxides (SO2) in many cases are used as indicators of the quality and freshness of food, the presence of high concentrations of nitrogen monoxide (NO) in exhaled air may indicate lung disease or cardiovascular system, ammonia (NH3 ) - about the presence of gastric ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori. The purpose of this work is to study the sorption properties of sensors based on porous silicon to spray compounds that contain atoms of nitrogen, sulfur, carbon: NO, NH3, NH4 +, SO, SO2, CO, CO2 and others. Meso- and nano-porous silicon treated by pre-processing silicon wafers in ammoniac-peroxide and acid-peroxide solutions by various methods combined with the subsequent formation of anodic porous silicon surface for different values of anode current. As shown by previous studies, under certain conditions of the formation of the porous layer the linear dependence of sensor surface potential on the concentration of ammonia can be obtained. Porosity silicon surface after anodizing studied by methods of metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Study of sorption properties of sensors surface by spectral, photometric and electrophysical methods was carried. The sensitivity of the analog path of computerized measuring system was provided at one pico Ampere. Measurement error and processing did not exceed 8%. According to the research, the structure and method for measuring and express analysis of content in air of compounds nitrogen, sulfur, carbon for tasks of food safety, biotechnology and medicine were proposed.

K.PII.6
18:40
Authors : Marta De Zotti, Giulia Marafon, Alessandro Moretto, Emanuela Gatto
Affiliations : M. De Zotti, G. Marafon and A. Moretto: Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy; E. Gatto: Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 00133 Rome, Italy.

Resume : A set of thymine-functionalized chromophores such as tetraphenylporphyrin, azobenzene and carbon quantum dots were synthesized and studied in terms of their self-recognition abilities to generate ordered nano-architectures. Additionally, fully adenine-capped, water soluble, gold nanoparticles were synthesized and properly characterized. In particular, even we observed a strong self-recognition between thymine-thymine systems, the fully functionalized adenine-capped nanoparticles act as a “breaking” molecular binder thus to allow the complementary recognition with the thymine-functionalized chromophores and the consequent molecular reorganization. It was found that adenine-thymine binding, occurring between these complementary self-organized complex systems, allowed the formation of precisely assembled nano-systems that powerfully depend in their morphologies from the nature of the chromophores utilized. These well organized supramolecular architectures are able to undergo to morphologically self-shaping process under illumination by visible light, through the activation of the plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles which selectively affected, and precisely rearranged, the binding modes of the self-assembled microstructures at the nanoscale level. Finally, these studies were extended to the selective molecular recognition at the surface, confirming the high binding affinity of these complex systems even at this level.

K.PII.7
18:40
Authors : D. Dutta Majumdar1, 3, D. P. Mondal2, M. Ghosh3, A. Roy Choudhury3, H. Rao, and J. Dutta Majumdar1
Affiliations : 1Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, India. 2Advanced Materials and Processes Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Bhopal 462064, India. 3Indian Institute of Engineering, Science, and Technology, Howrah, India

Resume : The present investigation, a detailed study of corrosion behavior and bio-activity of titanium based foam developed by powder metallurgy route has been carried out. Titanium based foam has been developed by powder metallurgy route using cenosphere, NaCl and NH4CO3 as space holders under optimum processing conditions. Followed by processing, a detailed characterization of the microstructure and phase of the composite has been carried out. The corrosion behaviour of the samples has been evaluated in Hank’s solution (CaCl2: 0.14g, MgSO4•7H2O: 0.1g, MgCl2.6H2O: 0.1g, Na2HPO4.2H2O: 0.06g, KH2PO4: 0.06g, glucose: 1.0g, NaHCO3: 0.35g and rest H2O to 1000 ml) by potentiodynamic polarization technique. The detailed objectives include understanding the role of space holders on the characteristics (microstructure, phase, composition, porosity) and corrosion behavior of the foamed coupons. In addition, the bioactivity behavior of the samples has also been evaluated by dipping it in Hank’s solution and subsequently, measuring the weight change and apatite deposition rate at regular interval. The future scope of development of nano-porous titanium foam has also been presented.

K.PII.8
18:40
Authors : Adam Myles, M. Daniela Angione, Leticia Esteban-Tejeda, Michelle Browne, Damien Haberlin, Thomas Doyle, Eoin M. Scanlan, Paula E. Colavita.
Affiliations : School of Chemistry , Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland; Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin; Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research (AMBER), Trinity College Dublin; University College Cork – National University of Ireland; National University of Ireland Galway, NUIG;

Resume : Fouling of materials in a marine environment is caused by the accumulation of microscopic and subsequently macroscopic organisms to their surface. Strategies for mitigating and controlling this process are interesting for both commercial and environmental reasons as fouling results in decreased materials performance, increased maintenance and cleaning costs in addition to increased concentration of pathogenic species in localised areas. Traditional methods of biofouling reduction involve application of biocidal coatings (e.g. metals or oxides) which are gradually released into the marine environment and can result in long term environmental problems, therefore development of environmentally-friendly, non-biocidal antifouling methods is paramount. Herein we report on the performance of carbohydrate thin film coatings for fouling reduction on alloys and polymeric materials commonly utilised in marine applications. Covalent attachment of carbohydrates was first studied on model surfaces using surface spectroscopies and microscopy. The performance of the coatings was studied in a coastal marine environment. Comparative analysis in addition to microscopy results suggest significant reduction in biological fouling compared to unmodified controls.

K.PII.9
18:40
Authors : Carlos Serpa,1 João Pina,1 Jana Janočková,2 Danijela Rostohar,3 Ondrej Soukup2
Affiliations : 1CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3044-535 Coimbra, Portugal; 2University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Biomedical Research Center, Sokolska 581, Hradec Kralove 50005, Czech Republic; 3HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic

Resume : From more than a decade it is known that Alzheimer disease is associated with the formation of plaques and tangles in the brain. The affecting levels of plaque increases for long time, up to 30 years, before clinical signs of Alzheimer disease appear. Amyloid beta peptides are involved in Alzheimer disease, forming insoluble and highly ordered linear aggregates, that grown into plaques. Compounds that selectively interfere with the molecular steps along the aggregation path are denominated amyloid inhibitors. Recent works by Shukla [1] and Chan [2,3] demonstrated that amyloid peptides can show intrinsic florescence in the visible wavelength region due to aggregation. Additionally structure-specific fluorescence lifetimes were observed. In this work we propose to study the influence of amyloid inhibitor compounds in the kinetics of fibril formation, by following both the steady-state and time-resolved aggregation-intrinsic visible florescence. Following noninvasively beta-amyloid fibril formation inhibition by the aggregation-intrinsic visible florescence offer a label-free method to test amyloid inhibitors and also envisages the possibility of the use of photonic devices in the early detection and treatment monitoring of amyloid related diseases. REFERENCES [1] A. Shukla et al, Arch Biochem and Biophys 425 (2004) 144. [2] F. T. S. Chan et al, Analyst 138 (2013) 2156. [3] D. Pinotsi et al, ChemBioChem 2013, 14, 846. Acknowledgements: This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement number 654148 Laserlab-Europe.

K.PII.10
18:50 Graduate Young Investigator Certificates    
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III. Smart Interfacial Materials Fundamentals, Engineering & Control, Elucidate Cellular Response Functionality in Progress. Bionic. Bioelectronic. : Organizer/Chair Professor Bo Zhu (Shanghai University, China)
08:45
Authors : Lei Jiang
Affiliations : Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China; School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China

Resume : Learning from nature and based on lotus leaves and fish scale, we developed super-wettability system: superhydrophobic, superoleophobic, superhydrophilic, superoleophilic surfaces in air and superoleophobic, superareophobic, superoleophilic, superareophilic surfaces under water [1]. Further, we fabricated artificial materials with smart switchable super-wettability [2], i.e., nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs) that consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials [3-4]. The smart super-wettability system has great applications in various fields, such as self-cleaning glasses, water/oil separation, anti-biofouling interfaces, and water collection system [5]. The concept of BCCNMs was further extended into 1D system. Energy conversion systems that based on artificial ion channels have been fabricated [6]. Also, we discovered the spider silk?s and cactus's amazing water collection and transportation capability [7], and based on these nature systems, artificial water collection fibers and oil/water separation system have been designed successfully [8]. Learning from nature, the constructed smart multiscale interfacial materials system not only has new applications, but also presents new knowledge: Super wettability based chemistry including basic chemical reactions, crystallization, nanofabrication arrays such as small molecule, polymer, nanoparticles, and so on [9]. Reference: 1. (a) Adv. Mater. 2014, 26, 6872-6897.. (b) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1727-1748. 2. Adv. Mater. 2008, 20 (15), 2842-2858. 3. Pure Appl. Chem. 2000, 72 (1-2), 73-81. 4. Small. 2015, 11, 1071-1096. 5. Adv. Mater. 2011, 23 (6), 719-734. 6. (a)Chem. Soc. Rev. 2011, 40 (5), 2385-2401; (b) Acc. Chem. Res. 2013, 46 (12), 2834-2846; (c) Adv. Mater. 2010, 22 (9), 1021-1024. (d) ACS Nano 2009, 3 (11), 3339-3342; (e) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51 (22), 5296-5307; 7. (a) Nature 2010, 463 (7281), 640-643; (b) Nat Commun 2012, 3, 1247. 8. (a) Nat Commun 2013, 4, 2276; (b) Adv. Mater. 2010, 22 (48), 5521-5525. 9. (a) Chem. Soc. Rev. 2012, 41 (23), 7832-7856; (b) Nat. Commun. 2015, 6, 6737. (c) Adv. Funct. Mater. 2011, 21 (17), 3297-3307; (d) Adv. Mater. 2012, 24 (4), 559-564; (e) Nano Research 2011, 4 (3), 266-273; (f) Soft Matter 2011, 7 (11), 5144-5149; (g Soft Matter 2012, 8 (3), 631-635; (h) Adv. Mater. 2012, 24 (20), 2780-2785; (i) Adv. Mater. 2013, 25 (29), 3968-3972; (j) J. Mater. Chem. A 2013, 1 (30), 8581-8586; (k) Adv. Mater. 2013, 25 (45), 6526-6533

K.III.1
09:25
Authors : Yaopeng Zhang *, Qingfa Peng, Li Lu, Huili Shao, Kankan Qin, Xuechao Hu, Xiaoxia Xia*
Affiliations : Donghua University; Donghua University; Donghua University; Donghua University; Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Donghua University; Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Resume : Spiders achieve superior silk fibres by controlling the molecular assembly of silk proteins and the hierarchical structure of fibres. However, current wet-spinning process for recombinant spidroins oversimplifies the natural spinning process. Here, water-soluble recombinant spider dragline silk protein (with a low molecular weight of 47 kDa) was adopted to prepare aqueous spinning dope. Artificial spider silks were spun via microfluidic wet-spinning, using a continuous post-spin drawing process. By mimicking the natural spinning apparatus, shearing and elongational sections were integrated in the microfluidic spinning chip to induce assembly, orientation of spidroins, and fibril structure formation. The additional post-spin drawing process following the wet-spinning section partially mimics the spinning process of natural spider silk and substantially contributes to the compact aggregation of microfibrils. Subsequent post-stretching further improves the hierarchical structure of the fibres, including the crystalline structure, orientation, and fibril melting. The tensile strength and elongation of post-treated fibres reached up to 510 MPa and 15%, respectively. This spinning process is economic and non-toxic, compared to traditional wet-spinning of recombinant spider silk. It also breaks the molecular weight limitation to reap artificial fibre with high strength.

K.III.2
09:50
Authors : Qigang Wang
Affiliations : Chemical Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China

Resume : Polymeric hydrogels with high mechanical strength are the important soft-wet materials for the applications in pharmaceutics, biomedical and industrial fields. Our group of Functional Nanocomposite Gel was founded in 2011 at School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tongji University. The current research focus on the mild preparation and 3D printing of hydrogel via enzymatic polymerization. The hydrogels and nanogel crosslinked at physiological condition are mainly applied as tissue engineering and bioimaging, respectively. We also design gel electrolyte by in-situ photo-polymerization for the application in energy devices.

K.III.3
10:15 Coffee break    
10:30
Authors : Po-Chun Huang, Jhih-Guang Wu, Yue Chen, Shyh-Chyang Luo
Affiliations : Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University

Resume : Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) or PEDOT has been demonstrated in various biomedical applications, ranging from biosensing to medical bionics. Being a conductive biointerface, PEDOTs can be served as an electrode for either electrochemical biosensing or to provide electrical stimuli on attached biomolecules. The functional groups on PEDOTs play an important role for the modification of surface property. In this presentation, I would like to introduce our strategies to manipulate the surface properties of PEDOT thin films for detection applications. The control of surface charge can enhance the interaction between charged biomolecules, such as dopamine, and PEDOT surfaces through coulomb force, which leads to a higher detection of these biomolecules. The recognition between specific compounds and functional groups, including phosphorylcholine and boronic acid groups, can also be used for the detection purpose. The recognition process between these functional groups on PEDOT thin films and targeted biomolecules are generally identified by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The attached biomolecules usually alter the charge distribution on PEDOT surfaces, which can also be measured by using an electrochemical technique.

K.III.4
10:50
Authors : Si-hao Qian
Affiliations : Si-hao Qian, Qichao Pan, Yongjun Bian, Yaqiong Zhang, State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials & College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Yong He, Center for Aviation Composites, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China

Resume : Advances of bioelectronics towards high-resolution communication and long-term implantation are reaching limitations of traditional materials such as metals and silicone. An ideal electronic material combining softness, biofunction, and low impedance is desired to meet the required biocompatibility and electrical trade-offs for interfacing with cells/tissues. Toward this aim, we developed a series of cell membrane mimicking EDOT polymers, which combining biofunction with low impedance. These conducting polymers present a high selectivity of interaction to targeted cells and proteins. The selective interaction could be well controlled to be static, dynamic or even 3-dimensional by defining various structures for building blocks. All these materials demonstrated an intimate, stable and efficient electrical interface with targeted cells, which is ensured by integrating nonspecific-binding resistance, specific interaction and low-impedance into one PEDOT polymer. To ensure integrity of the bioinspired PEDOTs on electrodes in long term stimulation, we further developed a series of bioinspired PEDOTs with a very strong adhesion to electrode substrates. The electrodes of the bioinspired PEDOTs demonstrated their long-term stability to functionalize in aqueous buffer at low impedance.

K.III.5
11:10
Authors : Zhi Geng , Qichao Pan, Zhengwei You, Bo Zhu
Affiliations : Zhi Geng , Qichao Pan, Zhengwei You, State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials& College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China ce and Engineering Shanghai University 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China E-mail: bozhu@shu.edu.cn

Resume : Conducting polymers had been widely used in the fields of cell-related diagnostic and therapeutic platforms. Among them, researchers showed great interests on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) due to its excellent properties of low structure defects, high aqueous stability and biocompatibility. Meanwhile, properly nanostructures could extremely enhance the tumor cell-capturing efficiency of bio-functional PEDOTs1. Several approaches have been made to fabricate PEDOT materials with nanostructures via template method, seeding, interfacial polymerization, vapor polymerization, and self-assembly approach. However, most of them require hard-templates or surfactants, which would complicate the preparation process and reduce the quality of the obtained materials. Therefore, we have proposed the approach for fabricating template-free bio-functional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) with controllable nanostructures via electrochemical deposition. By tuning the experimental condition, controllable switching nanodots and nanotube structure of PEDOT, PEDOT-OH and PEDOT-COOH could be fabricated. Meanwhile, changing of electric charges and physical structures of nanodots and nanotube PEDOT-OH films were studied to explain the morphology transformation. Besides, the cell-capturing efficiency was characterized of the nanodots and nanotube structure EDOT-COOH films after bio-conjugated. We hope this current study would provide a simple and effective method for fabricating high efficiency tumor cell-capturing materials. Reference: 1. Sekine J., Luo S-C, Wang S.,Zhu B., Tseng H-R and Yu H-H, Functionalized Conducting Polymer Nanodots for Enhanced Cell Capturing: The Synergistic Effect of Capture Agents and Nanostructures, Adv. Mater. 23, 4788–4792 (2011).

K.III.6
11:25
Authors : Shuo Chen, Lijie Sun, Zenghe Liu, Ziying Lv, Zhengwei You
Affiliations : State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University

Resume : Biodegradable and biocompatible elastomers (bioelastomers) could resemble the mechanical properties of extracellular matrix and soft tissues, thus, are very useful for many biomedical applications. Despite the significant advances, tough bioelastomers with fatigue resistance, self-recovery, shape memory properties, good biocompatible and biodegradability has remained elusive. Here, we report a new design concept of bioelastomers with aforementioned advantages via bioinspired sacrificial bonds. We graft2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinones (UPy) units with strong self-complementary quadruple hydrogen bonds to covalently crosslinked poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD),[1] refined version of a widely used bioelastomer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). The covalent crosslinks maintain the structural integrity of resultant PSeD-U bioelastomers compliant to dynamic mechanically environment. The reversible hydrogen bonds perform several mechanical functions simultaneously: toughening the bioelasomters and enhancing the tearing resistance (tearing energy of 3800 J/m2) via energy dissipation during bond rupture, and enabling the fatigue resistance and nearly 100% self-recovery during cyclic deformations by bond re-formation. PSeD-U bioelastomers can be tuned over a wider range by changing covalent crosslinking density and the grafting ratio of UPy unit. Furthermore?PSeD-U bioelastomers exhibit shape memory properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability. [1] You Z, Cao H, Gao J, Shin PH, Day BW, Wang Y. A functionalizable polyester with free hydroxyl groups and tunable physiochemical and biological properties. Biomaterials. 2010;31:3129-38.

K.III.7
11:35
Authors : Ao Zhuang, Yaopeng Zhang*
Affiliations : State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China

Resume : Silk fibroin is a good candidate to fabricate conductive biomaterial for bioelectrical applications because of its excellent mechanical property, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The modification by conductive polymer can endow silk fibroin with novel conductive functionality. Poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and its derivatives are very potential for the modification due to the high conductivity, biocompatibility, environmental stability and light transmittance. However, the hydrophobic EDOT monomers have difficulties in absorbing and synthesizing on the surface of silk fibroin. In order to improve the efficiency of the polymerization, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was adopted as surfactant while ammonium persulfate (APS) was used as oxidant. Poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-OH) was polymerized and covalently deposited as a conducting layer on the surface of RSF film. The effects of the dosages of surfactant and oxidant, initial pH value and monomer concentration on the conductivity and morphology of the film were investigated. Results showed that SDS plays an important role to construct smooth conductive coating with several microns. The conductive RSF film shows a square resistance on the order of 105? or a conductivity on the order of 10-3 S/cm. This modification can be applied for RSF materials with various forms including fiber, film, foam, mats and 3D scaffolds. It is also possible to construct a microfluidic device with integrated conductive RSF channel for further applications of biosensor, tissue engineering and organic electronics.

K.III.8
11:45
Authors : Congmei Lin, Feiyan Gong, Guansong He, Liping Pan, Shijun Liu
Affiliations : Institute of Chemical Material, China Academy of Engineering Physics

Resume : Inspired by the strong chemical adhesion of mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was adopted for coating the insensitive high explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) via a facile in situ polymerization of dopamine on the surface of explosive crystals. A robust and compact core-shell structure was confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. After coating, the mechanical strength improved with PDA loading, due to the formation of highly effective crosslinked network. With a PDA coating content of 4.5%, the compressive and tensile strength of TATB/PDA composites were 46.9% and 65.4% higher than that of the TATB alone. Compared with neat TATB, a remarkable enhanced effect was observed in non-linear creep properties at different temperatures and stresses for TATB/PDA composites with reduced creep strain and constant creep rate. The nonlinear dependence of the creep strain on creep time was fitted by a six-element mechanical model. The mechanical enhancement mechanism could be originated from that dense and rigid PDA shell which constrains the expansion and the slide of the single layer of TATB energetic crystals. Due to the high rigidity and strong chemical adhesion of PDA on the crystal surface, PDA acts as a high pressure vessel to envelop TATB crystals. The preparation of core-shell structure explosive composites with bio-inspired PDA material provides an efficient route for the mechanical enhancement of high explosives.

K.III.9
12:00 Lunch. General Photo.    
13:00
Authors : Shutao Wang
Affiliations : CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-inspired Materials and Interfacial Science, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

Resume : Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an emerging ?biomarker? for monitoring cancer metastasis and prognosis. Although there are existing technologies available for isolating/counting CTCs, the most common of which using immunomagnetic beads, they are limited by their low capture efficiencies and low specificities. By introducing a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured substrate ? specifically, a silicon-nanowire (SiNW) array coated with anti-EpCAM ? we can capture CTCs with much higher efficiency and specificity. The conventional methods of isolating CTCs depend on biomolecular recognitions, such as antigen-antibody interaction. Unlikely, we here proposed that nanoscaled local topographic interactions besides biomolecular recognitions inspired by natural immuno-recognizing system. This cooperative effect of physical and chemical issues between CTCs and substrate leads to increased binding of CTCs, which significantly enhance capture efficiency. Recently, we have developed a 3D cell capture/release system triggered by enzyme, electrical potential and temperature as well as magnetic field, which is effective and of ?free damage" to capture and release cancer cells. In addition, immune cells have also been employed as living template for greatly improving the limitation of traditional immunomagnetic beads. Furthermore, the potential pollution from biochip waste can be successfully disposed by employing self-cleaning substrates. Therefore, these bio-inspired interfaces open up a light from cell-based disease diagnostics to subsequent safety treatment of biomedical waste. References [1] Liu X. L.; Wang S. T. Chem. Soc. Rev. 2014, 43, 2385. [2] Zhang P.; Chen L.; Xu T.; Liu H.; Liu X.; Meng J.; Yang G.; Jiang L.; Wang S. T., Adv. Mater., 2013, 25, 3566. [3] Huang C.; Yang G.; Ha Q.; Meng J. X.; Wang S. T. Adv. Mater. 2015, 27, 310. [4] Li Y. Y.; Lu Q. H.; Liu H. L.; Wang J. F.; Zhang P. C.; Liang H. G.; Jiang L.; Wang S. T. Adv. Mater. 2015, 27, 6848. [5] Zhang F. L; Jiang Y.; Liu X. L.; Meng J. X.; Zhang P. C.; Liu H. L.; Yang G.; Li G. N.; Jiang L.; Wan L. J.; Hu J. S.; Wang S. T. Nano Lett. 2016, 16, 766.

K.III.10
13:30
Authors : Zhengwei You
Affiliations : State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University

Resume : Biodegradable and biocompatible elastomers (bioelastomers) can mimic the mechanical properties of soft tissues, and sustain and recover from various deformations without mechanical irritations to the surrounding tissues when implanted in a mechanically dynamic environment in the body. Thus, bioelastomers have attracted great attentions in multiple biomedical applications including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and in vivo sensing [1]. However , it is still a challenging to produce ideal bioelastomers with good biocompatibility, biodegradability, processability, bioactivity, and mechanical properties. Herein, we will present our recent works on design and development of new bioelastomers with aforementioned advantages. Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a representative of bioelastomers and has been widely used [2]. However, the limitations of its synthetic method lead to unsatisfied mechanical strength and inconvenient processing, which retard its further applications. We establish acid-induced epoxide ring-opening polymerization to produce poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD), a refined version of PGS, with significantly improved structural regularity and mechanical properties [3-4]. Then, we construct supramolecular PSeD elastomers with good thermoplastic processabilities and self-healing properties by introducing dynamic hydrogen bond-based crosslinkings [5]. Furthermore, we yield more tough PSeD bioelastomers via dual crosslinking mechanism. In addition, we demonstrate the efficiency to tailor the bioactivity using small functional units in side groups, which represents a powerful way of practically producing therapeutic materials [6-7]. Then, 3D printing technology with special processes has been developed to fabricate elastic scaffolds with well-organized hierarchical porous structures, which exhibit a high efficiency on the treatment of myocardial infarction in a rat model. The design strategies, the synthetic and processing methods developed here are versatile and provide new tools to construct bioelastomers with expected properties for a wide range of biomedical applications. Reference: [1] You Z, Wang Y. Bioelastomers in tissue engineering. In: Burdick J, Mauck RL, editors. Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications: a review of the past and future trends: Springer-Verlag/Wien; 2011. p. 75-118. [2] Rai R, Tallawi M, Grigore A, Boccaccini AR. Prog. Polym. Sci. 2012; 37: 1051-78. [3] You Z, Cao H, Gao J, Shin PH, Day BW, Wang Y. A functionalizable polyester with free hydroxyl groups and tunable physiochemical and biological properties. Biomaterials 2010; 31: 3129-38. [4] You Z, Wang Y. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2012; 22: 2812-20. [5] Chen S, Bi X, Sun L, Gao J, Huang P, Fan X, You Z, Wang Y. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2016; 8: 20591-9. [6] Wang S, Jeffries E, Gao J, Sun L, You Z, Wang Y. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2016; 8: 9590-9. [7] Huang P, Bi X, Gao J, Sun L, Wang S, Chen S, Fan X, You Z, Wang Y. J. Mater. Chem. B 2016; 4: 2090-101.

K.III.11
13:55
Authors : Fengxian Gao, Wanwan Li, Xiaoqian Wang, Ning Zhang, Mingming Ma
Affiliations : CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Chemistry, iChEM (Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials), Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026, China

Resume : Conductive polymers (CP), such as polythiophenes, polyanilines and polypyrroles, have been widely explored for applications including organic photovoltaic cells, organic electronics, supercapacitors and actuators. Free-standing CP films can be synthesized by electrochemical polymerization, while these films are often fragile and/or weak due to the rigid conjugated molecular structure. It is well known that animal dermis possesses a dynamic network structure consisted by rigid collagen fibers and soft elastin fibers, which interconnect through supramolecular interactions to form a dynamic network, making animal dermis a sturdy and flexible material. Inspired by the dynamic network structure of animal dermis, we have demonstrated that a dynamic network formed by supramolecular interconnection between a soft polymer and a rigid CP would yield a strong, tough and active CP-based composite material. The addition of soft polymer between rigid CP chains can help to enlarge the distance between rigid CP chains, which could enhance the motion of CP chain segment upon mechanical stress. From this point of view, the soft polymer serves as a plasticizer for CP. On the other hand, the supramolecular interactions such as dynamic covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between the soft polymer and CP are stronger than the van der Waals' force between typical plasticizer and plastics. Therefore, the soft polymer behaved as a dynamic crosslinking agent, which can greatly enhances the flexibility of CP with no compromise of the film's strength. Upon a large mechanical stress, the supramolecular interactions between soft polymers and rigid CP would break to dissipate destructive energy, which would greatly improve the toughness of the materials. Beyond the enhancement of mechanical properties, the dynamic nature of supramolecular interactions between soft polymer and rigid CP could also bring new properties to the CP-based composite material, such as stimuli-responsibility.

K.III.12
14:15
Authors : Mingjie Liu
Affiliations : Professor of Chemistry School of Chemistry Beihang University 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing, P. R. China Tel: +86-10-82621396 Email: liumj@buaa.edu.cn

Resume : Abstract: Water is essential for life on earth and considered a symbol of purity. 71% of the surface of our planet is covered by water, and our own body is composed of 65% of this simple but vital molecule. Considering increasing environmental issues, the idea of replacing plastics with water-based materials, so-called hydrogels, seems quite reasonable. Here we developed photolatently modulable hydrogels, composed of a polymer network accommodating photocatalytic titania nanosheets at every crosslinking point. As titania nanosheets can utilize gelling water as their source of radicals, its long-lasting photocatalysis makes the hydrogels readily modulable. Furthermore, We developed a highly anisotropic hydrogel having a large compression resistivity and, in its orthogonal direction, an ultralow internal friction, so that this material, just like articular cartilage, efficiently insulates horizontal vibrations even under a heavy weight. We anticipate that the concept of embedding anisotropic repulsive electrostatics within a composite material, inspired by articular cartilage, will open up new possibilities for developing soft materials with unusual functions.

K.III.13
14:35
Authors : Jiashing Yu, Hsiu-Wen Chien, Po-Hsiu Cheng, Shao-Yung Chen,Wei-Bor Tsai
Affiliations : National Taiwan University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C.

Resume : Antifouling modification technology is developed for many biomedical applications such as blood-contact devices and biosensors. In this work, a photo-reactive polymer containing zwitterionic carboxybetaine groups was prepared by copolymerization of two kinds of methacrylic acids with carboxybetaine and azidoaniline. The carboxybetaine moiety is for low fouling and the azidophenyl moiety is for photo-crosslinking. The synthesized copolymers were coated onto polymeric substrates, and then covalently immobilized on the substrates by exposure to UV radiation. The poly(CBMA-co-AzMA) coating revealed that cell and platelet adhesion and protein adsorption to the substrates were reduced significantly compared to the untreated substrate. Furthermore, the direct immobilization of galactrosamine was carried out on the polymer coating by EDC/NHS chemistry. The galactose-immobilized surface had the potential for selecting hepatocyte adhesion from co-population of differing cell types. In addition, the incorporation of photolithographic technology could make micropatterns of poly(CBMA-co-AzMA) coating for cell co-culture of hepatocytes and fibroblasts. This work demonstrates that the reported technique is an economic and facile tool for layers of reduced adsorption of protein modification with functional groups in one step.

K.III.14
14:55
Authors : Mo-Yuan Shen, Hsiao-hua Yu
Affiliations : Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica

Resume : Interfacing materials with cells through specific ligand/receptor interactions, matching mechanical properties, and matching nanostructures are very critical in biomedical technologies. Recently, conducting polymers have emerged for various related applications, ranging from biosensing to medical bionics. Many features of conducting polymers, including simplicity for nanostructure fabrication, tailored functional groups for bioconjugation, intrinsic electrical conductivity, and softer mechanical characteristics than metals, provide advantages as materials for cell-related diagnostic and therapeutic platforms as well as controlled cell engineering. The research of Yu Initiative Research Unit focus on the development of independent and multidisciplinary research program though the triangle of chemistry, electronic materials, and biomedical/biological investigations based on molecular and nano-assembled building blocks of conducting polymers. The organic conductive biomaterials we developed, unlike traditional polymers or inorganic metals/ceramics, provides a unique toolkit which integrates electrical control with all the known molecular and biomolecular building blocks required for bioengineering. Ultimately, it would provide a platform which can combine biochemical control, spatial arrangement, and matching mechanical characteristics with electrical stimulation or signaling. Nanostructures of conjugated materials have become one of the most important research topics in the research because of the nanostructure?s influence on the materials performance. Up to date, most research focus on the nanostructures and material properties of unfunctionalized ?-conjugated materials and limited studies on nanostructures of functionalized ones. Because of the molecular advantageous features of dioxythiophenes, we are particularly interested to develop general approaches for their polymeric nanostructures with various functional groups. We first enlarged the dioxythiophene-based monomer library with a variety of molecular building blocks. The monomers can be classified as two groups. Material modulation monomers are synthesized to manipulate the material properties, ranging from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic, and create desired assemblies. The side chains included alkyl groups, perfluorinated groups, oligoethylene glycol groups, and especially zwitterionic phosphorylcholine and betain groups. Our research represents the first example in linking these biomimetic zwitterionic side-chains in conjugated materials to create enzyme/cell resistant conductive surface. The other group of monomers is the ones provide target function. For the biomaterials research, they provide the site for bioconjugation (-COOH, -NH2, -maleimide, -N3). The library now consists of >80 monomers with different linkers and functional groups. Mixing the monomers from two groups, we would achieve ?-conjugated materials with desired functions and material characteristics. For example, we combined the maleimide- and phophorylcholine-functionalized dioxythiophenes to construct conductive membranes. Upon bioconjugation with neuron-targeting IKVAV ligand, the membrane selective binds PC12 cells with zero binding to the control NIH3T3 cells. In summary, we synthesized a variety of monomers which provide the target functions and modulate material properties. We also developed several methodologies to control the nano-assembly process during polymerization. With the ability to control molecular structure and nanostructures, we demonstrated the applications of these materials in cell capturing and engineering.

K.III.15
15:10
Authors : Qi-Chao Pan, Ya-Qiong Zhang, Hai-Chao Zhao, Yao-Peng Zhang, Bo Zhu
Affiliations : Qi-Chao Pan, Ya-Qiong Zhang, Yao-Peng Zhang, State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials& College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Haichao Zhao, Ningbo Institute of Industrial Technology (CNITECH), Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1219 Zhongguan West Road, Zhenhai, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201, China; Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China d Engineering Shanghai University 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China E-mail: bozhu@shu.edu.cn

Resume : Capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTC) hold a great potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized therapy, and tons of efforts have been carried out in recent years1. Most of the previous cell-capture platforms have a very high capture efficiency, but suffering from poor capture selectivity due to the presence of nonspecific interaction. In this study, to ensure both efficiency and selectivity at cell-capture, we fabricated a 3-dimensional conducting platform, which consists of a membrane mimicking PEDOT substrate2 and low density of membrane mimicking polymer chains grown from the conducting substrate. Its membrane mimicking feature promises the high selectivity of this conducting platform due to the absence of nonspecific interaction. Furthermore, the low density of cell-capture chains combines the softness and high density of accessible antibodies to ensure the high efficiency at cell-capture. The 3D conducting platform successfully demonstrated its superior performance at capturing CTCs than the previous nanodot PEDOT system3. We are now utilizing it as an electrochemical sensor to detect CTCs, and wish to report it in the near future. Reference 1. Li, Y. Q.; Chandran, B. K.; Lim, C. T.; Chen, X., Rational Design of Materials Interface for Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells. Adv Sci (Weinh) 2015, 2 (11), 1500118. 2. Zhu, B.; Luo, S. C.; Zhao, H.; Lin, H. A.; Sekine, J.; Nakao, A.; Chen, C.; Yamashita, Y.; Yu, H. H., Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer. Nat Commun 2014, 5, 4523. 3. Sekine, J.; Luo, S. C.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Tseng, H. R.; Yu, H. h., Functionalized conducting polymer nanodots for enhanced cell capturing: the synergistic effect of capture agents and nanostructures. Advanced materials 2011, 23 (41), 4788-4792.

K.III.16
15:20
Authors : Ya-Qiong Zhang, Gao Qiu, Bo ZHU
Affiliations : Ya-Qiong Zhang, Gao Qiu, State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials& College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China; Bo Zhu, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China Professor, PHD College of Materials Science and Engineering Shanghai University 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China E-mail: bozhu@shu.edu.cn

Resume : The local drug delivery by implanted devices or materials is an effective approach to manage chronic diseases. The electro-responsive platform supplies not only a chance to load a spatial-, temporal- and dosage-control on drug delivery, but also a potential to realize the on-demand delivery by a portable electric stimulus, which is particularly critical when a emergent medication become necessary. However, the electro-responsive delivery systems are challenged by the slow delivery rate, the poor reproducibility of drug release between the ON/OFF stimulation, and the PH variation during delivery. Toward solving these critical issues, we fabricated a reversibly electro-switchable drug delivery system based on electro-responsive PEDOT Materials. It complexes with functional molecules under reduction, while releases them quickly via applying a small value of oxidation potential. As the electro-switch is reversible, we could reload the drug molecules into the depot by applying a small reduction potential. We further demonstrated the release of molecules could be tuned precisely from a stable controlled rate to a burst release.

K.III.17
15:30
Authors : Dong Lei*, Binqian Yang*, Wenhui Gong**, Sen Li**, Xiaofeng Ye**, Zhengwei You*
Affiliations : *State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Shanghai 201620, P. R. China; email: zyou@dhu.edu.cn? **Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, No.197, Ruijin Er Road, Shanghai, 200025, P.R. China

Resume : Almost all tissues in the body possess a complex internal and highly branched vascular systems, and the main function of vascular networks aim to simultaneously provide appropriate provision of oxygen and nutrients to cells while allowing more efficient exchange of metabolites during the blood perfusion. [1] Mimicking natural micro-vascular networks to keep long-term survival of engineered tissues in vitro and in vivo is still a key challenge in tissue engineering.[2] Here, we present a strategy to create biodegradable patterned artificial vascular scaffold (PAVSs) with a long-range functional transport system via 3D printing technologies. The process is general and versatile, can fabricate flexible PAVSs using various elastic biomaterials. The PAVSs are similar to natural vascular networks in different length scales with well-organized structural features. The branching microchannels are interconnected that can support physiologically relevant perfusion and also can be extended to perfusable microcirculation for mass transfer in three dimensions. An abundance of honeycomb pores are uniformly distributed in vascular walls to allow osmotic exchange of biomolecules. On the basis of this methodology, the PAVSs showed good scalability to create a series of composite scaffolds with built-in hierarchical transport system by incorporating with traditional tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing techniques. We demonstrate the power of PAVS to promote mass exchange in thick tissue by showing that the PAVS can maintain the metabolic functions and viability of viable heart cells for 5 days in vitro three-dimensional cell culture at high cell densities, and facilitate the angiogenesis extending from the host tissue for 8 weeks in vivo. [1] Kang HW, Lee SJ, Ko IK, Kengla C, Yoo JJ, Atala A. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity. Nat Biotechnol 2016. [2] Zhang B, Montgomery M, Chamberlain MD, Ogawa S, Korolj A, Pahnke A, et al. Biodegradable scaffold with built-in vasculature for organ-on-a-chip engineering and direct surgical anastomosis. Nat Mater 2016.

K.III.18
 
POSTER SESSION : Professor Bo Zhu (Shanghai University, China)
15:40
Authors : Peng Wang †,*, and Hongwei Duan *
Affiliations : † Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 * School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637457

Resume : we report glucose oxidase-mimicking magnetic nanochains-supported AuNPs which can self-mix in small reaction volume, and easily be separated and recycled by using high saturation magnetization. Firstly, Fe3O4/PS-based magnetic nanochains were prepared by aligning them together in presence of an external magnetic field, and covalently linking the closely Fe3O4/PS NPs by self-polymerization of dopamine to form the polydopamine coated magnetic nanochains. Furthermover, the magnetic nanochains reduce HAuCl4 to prepare small AuNPs loaded on the surface of PMNCs. The naked AuNPs on the surface of magnetic nanochains exhibit GOx-mimicking catalytic activity. Therefore, magnetic nanochains@AuNPs are able to catalyze the oxidation of glucose in presence of oxygen producing gluconate and hydrogen peroxide, which are interrogated by HRP and TMB-based colorimetric assay. Moreover, both magnetic nanochains and magnetic nanochains@AuNPs could readily undergo magnetic separation, hence easily recyclable, and also can self-stir under a spinning magnetic field, which represent a platform for ultrasmall and self-stir GOx-mimicking magnetic nanochains@AuNPs biosensor for biomolecule recognition and label-free colorimetric detection.

K.PIII.1
15:40
Authors : Ying Huang, Hua Zhang
Affiliations : School of Materials Science and Engineering Nanyang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore

Resume : Enzymes are macromolecular biological catalysts in living organisms, which can catalyze a wide variety of biochemical reactions with high activity and specificity. Inspired by natural enzymes, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to the development of artificial enzymes to mimic the functions of natural enzymes. Here, we prepare freestanding ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) metalloporphyrin-based metal-organic framework (MOF) nanosheets with thickness of sub-10 nm by a facile surfactant-assisted bottom-up synthetic method, which act as peroxidase mimic. In addition, in order to mimic the multiple functions of natural system, the hybrid nanosheets, i.e. growth of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles (NPs) on 2D MOF nanosheets, are designed and prepared. The obtained hybrid nanosheets, with glucose oxidase GOx-like and peroxidase-like activities, are used to mimic the natural enzymes and catalyze the cascade reactions, which are commonly completed by the oxidase-peroxidase coupled enzyme systems. Our study paves a new avenue to design nanomaterial-based biomimetic catalysts for mimicking natural system.

K.PIII.2
15:40
Authors : Ningqi Luo, Yan Huang, Ching-Ping Wong, Yuanting Zhang, and Ni Zhao
Affiliations : Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, China

Resume : Flexible piezoresistive sensors (FPS) that can conform to curved surface or even human skin and bones extent the applications of conventional rigid pressure sensors to a much broader spectrum of biomedical disciplines, such as human-machine interaction, physiological signals monitoring, artificial knee implants, and clinical surgery. For some of these applications, e.g., artificial knee implants, it is particularly important for the sensor to provide a stable and repeatable pressure reading under bending. In this talk I will present our recent achievement in developing bending applicable sensors. In order to separately tune the mechanical and electrical properties of the sensor, we proposed a new graphene - polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hollow structure composite. Such design allows us to optimize the sensor sensitivity and linearity by tuning the number of graphene layers and hardness of PDMS, respectively. Furthermore, the “bending applicable” feature was achieved by controlling the pore density and thickness of the composite films. By reducing the film thickness to below 0.3mm and then optimizing the number of pore per inch (PPI), we achieved a low measurement error of <6% under various bending radius within the -25mm to +25mm range. The mechanisms underlying these observations were explained. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the sensor in epidermal pulse measurement and monitoring of robotic hand operation.

K.PIII.3
15:40
Authors : Si-Hao Qian, Yong He, Bo Zhu
Affiliations : Si-Hao Qian Donghua University PhD candidate State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials& College of Materials Science and Engineering Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China E-mail: sihaoseeker@gmail.com? Bo ZHU Shanghai University Professor, PHD College of Materials Science and Engineering Shanghai University 99 Shangda Road, BaoShan, Shanghai, 200444, China E-mail: bozhu@shu.edu.cn

Resume : Bioelectronic devices have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diverse medical fields such as the bionic ear and brain-computer interface. Electrode between the biotic and abiotic worlds has been demonstrated to be the most important part of these devices. However, implanting electrode inside the nervous system often incurs inflammatory response, which will lead to fibrous encapsulation, cutting off the connection between electrodes and electro-active cells and increasing the electrical impedance of the bioelectronics interface. Consequently, there is a high expectation for electrode coating of low impedance, high selectivity, high resolution and long-term stability. In early research, we have successfully developed a biomimetic conducting polymer film to facilitate a selective interaction to neural cells.1 However, the recording site is not the only part of an implanted electrode. The Insulating layer occupies the most part of the electrode, which plays very important role in the biocompatibility of the whole electrode. Therefore, we synthesized a protein/cell resistant poly(p-xylylene) thin film for the dielectric barrier. The design of bionic insulation significantly reduces the nonspecific adhesion of proteins/cells. We further integrated the biomimetic PEDOT derivatives with the bionic insulating material to fabricate an electrode array of all biomimicking polymers. We demonstrated that the feature of all biomimicking design ensures not noly a excellent proteins/cells resistance for the whole electrode but also a selective electrical interfacing of recording sites to neural cells. Reference: 1. B. Zhu, S.-C. Luo, H. Zhao, H.-A. Lin, J. Sekine, A. Nakao, C. Chen, Y. Yamashita and H.-h. Yu, Nature communications, 2014, 5.

K.PIII.4
15:40
Authors : Yan Zhang, Brigitte Städler.
Affiliations : iNANO Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark e-mail: yanzhang@inano.au.dk

Resume : Live cells are the basic working units in the biological tissue, performing different functions as natures’ microreactor. Assembly of sub-compartmentalized microreactors has become an important approach to mimic cells due to the structure similarity, ease of encapsulation of different subunits with multiple cargos, and the controllable activity initiation. With the aim to make artificial hepatocytes, we designed different sized microreactors with entrapped enzyme loaded liposomal subunits using droplet microfluidic or the layer-by-layer assembling technique. First, the synthetic partner particles or capsules were co-cultured with biological hepatocytes and successfully incorporated into the growing cell culture, forming bionic tissue with artificial and biological components. The surfaces of the particles or capsules coated with different polymers facilitated a beneficial biological response, i.e., the integration of the artificial and biological hepatocytes in a co-cultured tissue sheet as well as co-cultured cell tissue spheroids. The biological hepatocytes proliferation in the bionic tissue was assessed. Furthermore, detoxification, a key function of liver cells, was performed by loading the enzyme catalase, which can remove the cytotoxic compound hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), into the liposomal subunits of the artificial hepatocytes. The viability of hepatocytes in the bionic tissue was improved in the presence of active microreactors. These findings are a major step towards the beneficial combination of biological and synthetics entities with potential impact in regenerative medicine. Key words: cell mimicry, sub-compartmentalized microreactor, hepatocytes, detoxification, bionic tissue

K.PIII.5
15:40
Authors : Guomin Wang (1), Hongqing Feng (1, 2), Weihong Jin (1), Xuming Zhang (1), Yifan Huang (1), Ang Gao (1), Hao Wu (1), Guosong Wu (1), and Paul K. Chu (1)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China; (2) Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing 100083, P. R. China

Resume : Magnesium-based materials are preferential candidates for orthopedic implants due to their biodegradability, mechanical properties, and intrinsic antibacterial properties. However, the fundamental mechanism of bacteria killing remains unclear. In this study, a systematic study of the antibacterial properties of two common Mg-based materials is performed using a biofilm forming bacterium. Complete annihilation of the initial 3×10^4 bacteria is achieved with both materials in 0.1 mL LB medium in 24 h, whereas in the control they proliferate to 2-3×10^10. The bacteria are killed more effectively in the solution than on the surface, and the bacteria killing efficiency depends more on the concentrations of the magnesium ions and hydroxyl ions than the corrosion rate. The killing process is reproduced using formula solutions and killing is revealed to stem from the synergetic effects of alkalinity and magnesium ions instead of either one of them or Mg(OH)2 precipitate. Besides, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are detected from the bacteria during the killing process, but not likely produced by the redox reaction directly, because they are detected at least 3 h after the reaction has commenced. The average cell size increases during the killing process suggesting that the bacteria have difficulty with normal division, which also contributes to the reduced bacteria population. This systemetic study of antibacterial mechanism can give insight into better utilising magnisium-based biomaterials.

K.PIII.6
15:40
Authors : Andrés Vásquez Quintero, Rik Verplancke, Herbert De Smet, Jan Vanfleteren
Affiliations : Centre for Microsystems Technology (CMST), imec and Ghent University, Technologiepark 15, 9052 Gent, Belgium

Resume : A smart contact lens, envisioned to correct or improve the vision, entails the integration of several electronics components such as: Si chips, a power source and an electro-optic module. All of them being interconnected by non-conventional electrical layouts in a fully stretchable platform. Such a platform must be designed with strict geometrical requirements and material limitations, to attain compulsory characteristics such as: biocompatibility, oxygen/light transparency, and being imperceptible by the human eye. The fabrication presented here relies on a planar process in order to later transform the flat platform (including thin film electronics circuitry, Si chips and interconnections) into a curvilinear spherical geometry by means of thermoforming. In particular, we introduce the platform’s mechanical carrier as a soft and biocompatible thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which serves as the thermoforming element and provides the essential support and stretchability. The latter enables the necessary conformability with the outer contact lens materials (i.e. based on hydrogels) and the spherical shape of the eye at the cornea. Furthermore, thanks to a developed thermoforming 3D and time domain Finite Element Model (FEM), the prediction of the final lens curvature and the analysis of the induced mechanical stress throughout the thermoforming step were attained. The model, based on the Generalized Maxwell viscoelastic model, was experimentally validated for several thermoforming temperatures (i.e. from 80°C to 140°C) and for 100 μm thick thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) films. These films were patterned with optimized meandered designs in order to accommodate mechanical deformations during thermoforming. Such designs generated buckle-free platforms by reducing the hoop strain especially at its outer edge, which directly increased their mechanical robustness. Finally, the complete stack including the TPU carrier, a Si chip and a thin film flexible circuitry (i.e. stack of polyimde/gold/polyimide patterned by photolithography) was successfully thermoformed with a final curvature of 9 mm (12% difference with respect to the mold’s curvature of 8 mm). The independent and parallel processing of the thin film electronics and TPU carrier which are joined only at the end of the process, considerably increases their fabrication yield and decouples their processing incompatibilities. This, in combination with a short thermoforming step at relatively low temperature, paves the way towards mass scalable fabrication of soft smart contact lenses with integrated electronic components, including Si/foil-based chips, electro-optics, RFID antennas, micro-size batteries and photovoltaic cells, among others.

K.PIII.7
15:40
Authors : Guomin Wang (1), Hongqing Feng (1,2), Ang Gao (1), Weihong Jin (1), Qi Hao (1), Xiang Peng (1), Wan Li (1), Guosong Wu (1), Paul K Chu (1)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China; (2) Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing 100083, P. R. China

Resume : Titania doped with noble metal nanoparticles exhibits enhanced photocatalytic killing of bacteria under light illumination due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property. Recently, it has been reported that doping with Au or Ag can also endow TiO2 with antibacterial ability in the absence of light. However, the underlying mechanism is still far from understood. In this work, the antibacterial mechanism of Au-doped TiO2 nanotubes (Au@TiO2-NT) in the dark environment is studied and a novel EET from the aerobic S. aureus to the Au@TiO2-NT surface is discovered, which forms a ?bacteria-current? similar to the photocurrent on the electrochemical workstation. Electron-light region in the bacteria structure is also observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM), supporting the EET phenomena mentioned above. The physiological changes in intracellular components leakage and ROS production are also studied to investigate the detailed bacterial killing process. Our results indicate that although the EET-induced bacteria current is similar to the LSPR-related photocurrent, the former takes place without light and no reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the process. The EET is also different from what are commonly attributed to microbial fuel cells (MFC) because it is dominated mainly by the materials surface, but not the bacteria, and the environment is aerobic. EET on the Au@TiO2-NT surface kills Staphylococcus aureus but if it is combined with special MFC bacteria, the efficiency of MFC may be improved significantly.

K.PIII.8
15:40
Authors : Hsiu-Wen Chiena, Po-Hsiu Cheng, Shao-Yung Chen, Jiashing Yu, Wei-Bor, Tsai
Affiliations : Department of Chemical Engineering National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. E-mail: jiayu@ntu.edu.tw

Resume : Antifouling modification technology is developed for many biomedical applications such as blood-contact devices and biosensors. In this work, a photo-reactive polymer containing zwitterionic carboxybetaine groups was prepared by copolymerization of two kinds of methacrylic acids with carboxybetaine and azidoaniline. The carboxybetaine moiety is for low fouling and the azidophenyl moiety is for photo-crosslinking. The synthesized copolymers were coated onto polymeric substrates, and then covalently immobilized on the substrates by exposure to UV radiation. The poly(CBMA-co-AzMA) coating revealed that cell and platelet adhesion and protein adsorption to the substrates were reduced significantly compared to the untreated substrate. Furthermore, the direct immobilization of galactrosamine was carried out on the polymer coating by EDC/NHS chemistry. The galactose-immobilized surface had the potential for selecting hepatocyte adhesion from co-population of differing cell types. In addition, the incorporation of photolithographic technology could make micropatterns of poly(CBMA-co-AzMA) coating for cell co-culture of hepatocytes and fibroblasts. This work demonstrates that the reported technique is an economic and facile tool for layers of reduced adsorption of protein modification with functional groups in one step.

K.PIII.9
16:15 PLENARY SESSION    
Start atSubject View AllNum.Add
 
IV. New Frontiers in Nanocarbons: 2D Materials, 3D Architecture Structures, Polycrystalline Graphene & Bio (synthesized, printed, immobilized, integrated) Nanocarbons Multifunctionality. Keynote Session. : Organizers/Chairs Dr. Nikos G. Tsierkezos (TU Ilmenau, Germany), Dr. Oleksand Ivanyuta (TSN University of Kyiv, Ukraine) and Professor Silvia Giordani (University of Turin, IIT, Genova, Italy, COST Action CA 15107 WG3 Chief)
08:30
Authors : Dirk M. Guldi
Affiliations : University of Erlangen, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Egerlandstr. 3, 91056 Erlangen, Germany

Resume : The versatility of carbon-based nanomaterials in terms of structural and electronic properties renders them broadly applicable electroactive components for future energy devices. Throughout the past decades, the fundamental basis has been laid for understanding and tailoring the charge-transfer characteristics of carbon nanomaterials ranging from fullerenes and carbon nanotubes to graphene, as well as chemically modified derivatives. Fullerenes are essential for understanding unidirectional charge-transport and -transfer phenomena at the molecular level, whereas with carbon nanotubes and graphene, efficient intrinsic bidirectional transport and transfer are realized. Such a plethora of nanomaterials fosters the idea of developing functional all-carbon-based devices. In this presentation, we survey the role of carbon-based nanomaterials in energy-conversion schemes. In particular, we highlight charge-transfer processes on the molecular scale in sp2 carbon in zero dimensions (fullerenes), sp2 carbon in one dimension (carbon nanotubes), sp2 carbon in two dimensions (graphene), and sp2/sp3 carbon in zero and two dimensions (defectuous carbon nanostructures).

K.IV.1
09:00
Authors : a,d Karolis Vilcinskas, b Kaspar M.B. Jansen, a Fokko M. Mulder,a Ger J.M. Koper, a Ben Norder, c Jure Zlopasa, a Stephen J. Picken
Affiliations : a Department of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands; b Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands; c Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands; d current address: KTP Associate - Polymer Engineering at University of Bradford/BNL Bearings, United Kingdom

Resume : We report on the thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of alginate biopolymer nanocomposites prepared by solution casting with various amounts of montmorillonite clay (MMT), graphene oxide (GO) or reduced GO (rGO). Our data shows that the thermal stability of alginate nanocomposites can be improved by the introduction of cross-linking through divalent metal cations, albeit that under these conditions little influence by the amount of rGO remains. On the other hand, the electrical conductivity of divalent metal ion cross-linked-rGO improves approximately 10 orders of magnitude with increasing weight fraction of rGO, whereas it declines for sodium alginate-GO composites. In addition, storage moduli and glass to rubber transition temperatures show strong composition dependence as a consequence of complex interactions of the ions with both the polymer and the filler. We propose a mechanical model that allows for the accurate prediction of reinforcement by GO sheets in sodium alginate-GO composites taking into account the orientational order of the sheets. Creep tests reveal the complex nature of multiple stress relaxation mechanisms in the nanocomposites although the stretched exponential Burgers' model accurately describes short time creep compliance. References: [1] "Tunable Order in Alginate/Graphene Biopolymer Nanocomposites" K. Vilcinskas, B. Norder, K. Goubitz, F.M. Mulder, G.J.M. Koper, S.J. Picken, Macromolecules 2015, 48(22), 8323-8330. [2] ?Water Sorption and Diffusion in (Reduced) Graphene Oxide-Alginate Biopolymer Nanocomposites? Water Sorption and Diffusion in (Reduced) Graphene Oxide-Alginate Biopolymer Nanocomposites?, K. Vilcinskas, J. Zlopasa, K.M.B. Jansen, F.M. Mulder, S.J. Picken, G.J.M. Koper, Macromolecular Materials and Engineering (2016), 301(9), DOI: 10.1002/mame.201600154 [3] ?Composition dependent properties of graphene (oxide)-alginate biopolymer nanocomposites?, K. Vilcinskas, K.M.B. Jansen, F.M. Mulder, S.J. Picken, G.J.M. Koper, Polymer Composites (2016) DOI:10.1002/pc.24223

K.IV.2
09:15
Authors : Jean-François Nierengarten
Affiliations : Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux Moléculaires, Université de Strasbourg et CNRS (UMR 7509), ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France

Resume : One important aspect of modern chemistry is directed towards the synthesis of complex nanomolecules that exhibit specific properties for applications in materials science and biology. However, the preparation of complex nanostructures combining the required functional groups remains often difficult and requires a large number of synthetic steps thus limiting both their accessibility and applicability. Our research group has shown that the preparation of easily accessible nanoscaffolds allowing for the grafting of one or more molecular entities is an appealing strategy to generate sophisticated nanomolecules. Overall, one of our main concerns is to increase the complexity of the molecular structures without increasing the synthetic difficulties. Our latest advances in this particular field will be presented with special emphasis on the preparation of bioactive compounds.

K.IV.3
09:30
Authors : Dr. Nikos G. Tsierkezos
Affiliations : Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Weimarer Straße 25, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany

Resume : Nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) were decorated with metal nanoparticles (Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt, Au) and applied for simultaneous analysis of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) [1]. In N-MWCNTs/MNPs composite films three well-separated (not overlapped) oxidation waves were obtained for AA, DA, and UA analytes permitting their simultaneous analysis. Slight dependence of separation between oxidation waves of studied biomolecules on type of nanoparticles used for modification of N-MWCNTs was observed. Consequently, within the MNPs studied, AuNPs appear to improve better the electrocatalytic activity and sensitivity of N-MWCNTs. Namely, on N-MWCNTs/AuNPs the oxidation overpotential of AA decreases significantly and well-separated oxidation waves for interfering AA and DA compounds can be obtained. In addition, on N-MWCNTs/AuNPs well-separated oxidation waves for DA and UA can be observed. Consequently, the detection ability of N-MWCNTs/AuNPs towards simultaneous oxidation of AA, DA, and UA appears to be greater compared to other composite films [2]. References 1- N.G. Tsierkezos, P. Szroeder, U. Ritter, Microchim. Acta (2014) 181, 329-337. 2- N.G. Tsierkezos, U. Ritter, Y. Nugraha Thaha, C. Downing, P. Szroeder, P. Scharff, Microchim. Acta (2016) 183, 35-47.

K.IV.4
09:45
Authors : Fang Gao 1, Christoph E. Nebel 2
Affiliations : 1. Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle, Germany; 2. Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg, Germany

Resume : The scientific interest in diamond surface started already in 1970s for its field emission properties originated from negative electron affinity. Since 1990s due to the development in boron doping in CVD process, diamond has been investigated as one of the most promising electrode materials for analytical chemistry because of its unique electrochemical properties including outstanding stability, wide electrochemical window, flexible surface termination and abundance of surface chemistry. In the last ten years, with the advance in diamond dry- etching and templated growth technology, surface-enlarged, nanostructured diamond electrodes are now widely available. For example, using self-organized Ni nanoparticle as etching mask, vertically aligned diamond nanowires can be fabricated; using quartz or glass fiber paper as growth templates, porous diamond membranes are fabricated [1, 2]. These progresses have brought about new applications in energy related topics and membrane technology. In our previous work, these diamond-based materials has been successfully applied in double layer capacitor, as well as the current-collecting material [3] for pseudocapacitive/battery materials [4]. In these applications, diamond showed interesting properties which differs from traditional sp2 carbon materials. In our recent progress, we have demonstrated the ability of diamond membrane in electrochemical separation processes. Compared to polymer membranes or membranes based on sp2 carbons, diamond membranes can survive in aggressive media and high temperature conditions. Also, the ion selectivity can be controlled by surface terminations as well as the bias potential of the membrane. Therefore, this kind of membranes is very promising for the electrochemical separation processes such as desalination, pollutants concentration and protein separation. However, both the fabrication and application of diamond membranes are so far reported only in very limited cases. In this paper, we focus on our recent development with respect to the templated diamond growth using quartz fiber filter as the growth template [5]. With optimized microwave CVD growth, nanocrystalline diamond film is fully coated onto the quartz fiber as has been confirmed via SEM. The diamond quality is evaluated via Raman spectroscopy. The potential window of the diamond membrane is determined to be over 3 V in aqueous electrolyte solutions. By applying potential to the membrane, reactive ions will accumulate inside the membrane and change its porosity. As a result, the ion flux through the membrane can be well tuned. This ion selectivity can be used to separate charged molecules. Moreover, due to the chemical stability of diamond, the membrane can be cleaned in situ via a high potential Therefore, this membrane is also suitable for applications where only simple in-situ maintenances are possible. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 Programme under Grant Agreement no. 665085 (DIACAT). [1] F. Gao*, M. T. Wolfer, C. E. Nebel. Highly porous diamond foam as a thin-film micro-supercapacitor material, Carbon, 2014;80:833-840. [2] F. Gao*, G. Lewes-Malandrakis, M. T. Wolfer, W. Müller-Sebert, P. Gentile, D. Aradilla, T. Schubert, C. E. Nebel, Diamond-coated silicon wires for supercapacitor applications in ionic liquids, Diamond and Related Materials, 2015; 51:1-6. [3] F. Gao*, C. E. Nebel, Diamond-Based Supercapacitors: Realization and Properties, ACS applied materials & interfaces, 2016; 8 (42): 28244–28254 [4] F. Gao*, C. E. Nebel, Diamond Nanowire Forest Decorated with Nickel Hydroxide as a Pseudocapacitive Material for Fast Charging-Discharging, Physica Status Solidi (a), 2015; 212(11): 2533-2538 [5] F. Gao*, C. E. Nebel, Electrically Conductive Diamond Membrane for Electrochemical Separation Processes, ACS applied materials & interfaces, 2016; 8 (28): 18640–18646

K.IV.5
10:00 Coffee break    
10:30
Authors : Christian Müller
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden

Resume : Buckminsterfullerene and its soluble derivatives possess a unique set of electronic properties, most notably a high electron affinity and electron mobility. This talk will discuss how the use of fullerenes can benefit two (renewable) energy technologies: (1) polymer solar cells and (2) power cables. Polymer solar cells attract considerable attention as a potential renewable energy technology. The light-harvesting efficiency of polymer solar cells based on conjugated polymer:fullerene blends is continuously increasing. However, before practical applications can be considered, the long-term thermal stability of these devices must be improved. I will introduce two tools based on (1) nucleating agents and (2) fullerene mixtures, which permit to considerably enhance the thermal stability of this promising class of materials. Power cables are essential for grid integration of renewable energy installations, which are often located in sparsely populated areas. I will discuss the use of fullerenes as voltage-stabilizers for polyethylene, i.e. additives that increase the dielectric strength of an insulation material, which is facilitated by the high electron affinity of fullerenes. The use of such additives may considerably reduce power transmission losses and thus enhance the scope of renewable energy technologies such as solar cells.

K.IV.6
10:50
Authors : Rossana Rauti†, Neus Lozano§, Veronica León ‡, Denis Scaini†,#, Mattia Musto ø, Ilaria Rago#, Francesco P. Ulloa Severino ø , Alessandra Fabbro║, Loredana Casalis#, Ester Vázquez‡, Kostas Kostarelos§, Maurizio Prato║&¥* and Laura Balleriniø*
Affiliations : †Life Science Department, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste, Italy §Nanomedicine Lab, School of Medicine and National Graphene Institute, Faculty of Medical & Human Sciences, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester, United Kingdom ‡Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologías Químicas-IRICA Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain #ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Source, 34149 Trieste, Italy øInternational School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), 34136 Trieste, Italy ║Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste, Italy &CIC BiomaGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Paseo Miramón, 182, 20009 San Sebastián (Guipúzcoa), Spain ¥Basque Foundation for Science, Ikerbasque, Bilbao 48013, Spain

Resume : Graphene offers promising advantages for biomedical applications. However, adoption of graphene technology in biomedicine also poses important challenges in terms of understanding cell responses, cellular uptake or the intracellular fate of soluble graphene derivatives. In the biological microenvironment graphene nanosheets might interact with exposed cellular and subcellular structures resulting in unexpected regulation of sophisticated biological signaling. More broadly, biomedical devices based on the design of these 2D planar nanostructures for interventions in the central nervous system (CNS) requires an accurate understanding of their interactions with the neuronal milieu. Here, we describe the ability of graphene oxide nanosheets to down-regulate neuronal signaling without affecting cell viability. Beyond the safe design of nanomaterials, such a specific interference affecting exquisite CNS signaling may offer possibilities in neuropharmacology, when specific targeting of excitatory synapses is desired. The use of nanoparticles as therapeutics is in fact fueled by their ability to circumvent biological barriers and targeting of synapses has created the basis for theranostics applications. Our observations with thin s-GO flakes illustrate the potential of 2D nanosheet physical properties to engineer specific glutamate-transmission modulators.

K.IV.7
11:10
Authors : Ching-Wei Lin; R. B. Weisman
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry & the Smalley–Curl Institute, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA

Resume : Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) are potentially good candidates for in vivo optical imaging because they fluoresce in short-wave infrared (SWIR; 900-1600 nm) region. This provides lower scattering and autofluorescence backgrounds than in the visible range. The richness of their structural diversity provides a wide variety of SWIR emission wavelengths, enabling many applications including strain sensing, spectrally multiplexed immunoprobing, and spectral triangulation. Not only does the emission of SWCNTs expand the immunoprobe detection window beyond visible wavelengths into the SWIR, but it also provides spectral multiplexing because of the sharp and distinct emission peaks of different SWCNT structural species. However, the optical detection of nanomaterials is hampered by the strong absorption and scattering of light in tissues. Fortunately, the emission of SWCNTs located at the long-wavelength edge of the optical window, which has the optimal light transparency in tissues. The relatively high transparency and low backgrounds yield high contrast for in vivo detection. Recent advances of in vivo SWCNT imaging have demonstrated the viability of using SWCNTs as immunoprobes, but more sensitive detection with lower detection limits is desired. Also, three dimensional localization of SWCNTs in vivo instead of two dimensional imaging is another emerging challenge. We have therefore been developing sensitive in vivo detection, using a unique InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector, combined with a new spectral triangulation method with sub-millimeter resolution for locating SWCNT-immunoprobes targeted to cancer cell markers. We hope that our recent studies will advance the trace detection and localization of SWIR-fluorescent nanomaterials in preclinical research.

K.IV.8
 
Keynote Presentations of Investigators for The COST Action CA 15107 MultiComp, The Working Group WG 3”Chracterization, Health and Safety” : Professor Silvia Giordani (University of Turin, IIT, Genova, Italy, COST Action CA 15107 WG3 Chief)
11:20
Authors : Professor Silvia Giordani Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry Founder of the Nano Carbon Materials Laboratory Working Group Leader of the COST Action CA 15107 “Multi-Functional Nano-Carbon Composite Materials Network (MultiComp)”
Affiliations : 1 Department of Chemistry, Università di Torino, via Giuria 7, 10125, Turin, Italy s.giordani@unito.it; 2 Nano Carbon Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genoa, Italy silvia.giordani@iit.it

Resume : Multi-shell fullerenes, also known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are structured by concentric shells of carbon atoms and display several unique properties, such as a large surface area to volume ratio, low density and a graphitic multilayer morphology.1 In my research group we have developed a versatile and robust approach for the functionalisation of CNOs, involving the facile introduction of a number of simple functionalities onto their surface. Multimodal imaging probes based on carbon nano-onions (CNOs) have emerged as a platform for bioimaging because of their cell-penetration properties and minimal systemic toxicity.2-3 We have developed a synthetic multi-functionalisation strategy for the introduction of different functionalities (receptor targeting unit and imaging unit) onto the surface of the CNOs The modified CNOs display high brightness and photostability in aqueous solutions and their selective and rapid uptake in two different cancer cell lines without significant cytotoxicity is demonstrated. The localization of the functionalized CNOs in late-endosomes cell compartments is revealed by a correlative approach with confocal and transmission electron microscopy.4 Understanding the biological response of functionalized CNOs with the capability to target cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles in the cellular environment, will pave the way for the development of a new generation of imaging probes for future biomedical studies. References: 1. J. Bartelmess and S. Giordani Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1980–1998. 2. M. Yang, K. Flavin, I. Kopf, G. Radics, G. J. McManus, B. Moran, L. Echegoyen, S. Giordani and E.C. Lavelle Small 2013, 9, 4194-4206. 3. M. d’Amora, M. Rodio, J. Bartelmess, G. Sancataldo, R. Brescia, F. Cella Zanacchi, A. Diaspro and S. Giordani Scientific Reports, 2016 6, 33923 4. M. Frasconi, R. Marotta, L.Markey, K. Flavin, V. Spampinato, G. Ceccone, L. Echegoyen, E. Scanlan and S. Giordani Chem. Eur J. 2015, 21, 1971-19080. Acknowledgments: COST Action CA 15107 “Multi-Functional Nano-Carbon Composite Materials Network (MultiComp)”

K.IV.9
11:45
Authors : Gina MANDA, Silvia GIORDANI
Affiliations : "Victor Babes" National Institute of Pathology, Radiobiology Department, 99-101 Splaiul Independentei, 050096 Bucharest, Romania, gina.manda@gmail.com; Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Nano Carbon Materials, Nanophysics Department, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italy, silvia.giordani@iit.it

Resume : The network medicine concept has produced a major paradigm shift in the way we understand and treat disease. Based on molecular profiles, symptoms-unrelated diseases could be grouped in specific “diseaseome” clusters. One example is the “redox diseaseome” that is encompassing diseases underlined by chronic low-grade oxidative stress, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Nanomaterials have arisen lately as valuable vehicles for therapeutic molecules. For improving the efficacy of nano-enabled therapies, the properties and consequent biological effects of nanostructures should be smartly tailored to target the pathologic molecular profile of disease and patient. The case of carbon and iron oxide nanostructures designed as vehicles for the treatment of redox diseases will be discussed in terms of impact on oxidative stress, redox signaling and antioxidant response. A special focus will be given to the Janus face of reactive oxygen species which may act as friends or foes, depending on the context. Acknowledgements: COST Action CA15107 “Multi-Functional Nano-Carbon Composite Materials Network (MultiComp)”, M-Era.Net project 52/2016 (NANOTHER)

K.IV.10
12:00
Authors : Marta d?Amoraa, Sefania Lettierib, Adalberto Camisascab, Alberto Diasproa,c, Silvia Giordanib,d
Affiliations : a Nanoscopy, Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genoa, 16163, Italy b Nano Carbon Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy c NIC@IIT, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy d Chemistry Department, Università di Torino, via Giuria 7, 10125, Torino, Italy

Resume : Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are a class of carbon nanomaterials which presents high cellular uptake, low cytotoxicity and weak inflammatory potential [1]. In particular, boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized CNOs are suitable for high resolution imaging [2]. In this study, we focus our attention on the possible adverse effects and biocompatibility of BODIPY CNOs on the development of zebrafish (Danio rerio). This is an excellent and predictive vertebrate model organism for addressing toxicity of numerous nanomaterials at the whole animal level [3]. We characterize all the macroscopic effects by assessing different exposure periods and end-points, such as possible presence of malformations and behavioral anomalies. Furthermore, we carry out a 3D mapping of BODIPY CNOs in the whole zebrafish embryo/larvae by means of advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques, such as inverted selective plane illumination microscopy (iSPIM). These techniques provide a good optical section capability, low photo damage and fast imaging speed, allowing to 3D imaging of zebrafish embryos and larvae [4]. As the use of carbon based materials constantly increases, our results will open new perspectives in the biosafety of carbon nanomaterials. [1] M. Yang, K. Flavin, I. Kopf, G. Radics, C.H. A. Hearnden, G.J. McManus, A. Villalta-Cerdas, L.A. Echegoyen, S. Giordani, E.C. Lavelle "Chemical surface functionalization of carbon nanoparticles modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and NLRP3 inflammasome activation", Small, 9, 4194-4206 (2013). [2] J. Bartelmess, E. De Luca, A. Signorelli, M. Baldrighi, M. Becce, R. Brescia, V. Nardone, E. Parisini, L. Echegoyen, P.P. Pompa, S. Giordani "Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized carbon nano-onions for high resolution cellular imaging", Nanoscale, 6, 13761-13769 (2014). [3] M. d'Amora, J. Bartelmess, G. Sancataldo, F. Cella Zanacchi, A. Diaspro, S. Giordani "Biocompatibility and biodistribution of functionalized carbon nano-onions (f-CNOs) in a vertebrate model, Scientific Reports, 6, 33923 (2016). [4] Z. Lavagnino, G. Sancataldo, M. d?Amora, P. Follert, D. De Pietri Tonelli, A. Diaspro, F. Cella Zanacchi "4D (x-y-z-t) imaging of thick biological samples by means of Two-Photon inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (2PE-iSPIM) ", Scientific reports, 6, 23923 (2016). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Cost action CA15107 "Multi-functional nano-carbon composite materials network"

K.IV.11
12:15
Authors : S. Lettieri (1), A. Camisasca (1), M. d’Amora (3), A. Diaspro (3), S. Giordani (1,2)
Affiliations : 1 Nano Carbon Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy 2 Chemistry Department, Università di Torino, via Giuria 7, 10125, Turin, Italy 3 Nanoscopy, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy

Resume : Multi-shell fullerenes, known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs), have recently aroused great interest among researchers and have been successfully applied in a variety of different fields of application [1]. CNOs are attractive platforms for imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as they are small and they can be surface chemically modified allowing cell penetration and cell recognition respectively. In particular, the development of novel fluorescent systems for bio-imaging applications is a research field of increasing interest. One of the strategy to enhance bio-imaging rely on the development of imaging probes for the biologically relevant near-infra red (NIR) and far-red region, where tissue exhibit minimal absorbance[2]. Our recent reports showed that fluorescently labelled CNOs exhibit weak inflammatory potential and a low cytotoxicity[3]. They are readily internalized by cancer cells and deposited in the lysosomes[4, 5]. Moreover, in vivo studies on zebrafish (Danio Rerio) during the development shown their biocompatibility and homogenous distribution in a vertebrate model system, making them suitable as biomedical probes[6]. However the potential of carbon-based nanomaterial for biological application can be further enhanced by increasing their solubility in water-based medium obtaining small specialized nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. Here we report the development of a new generation of far-red imaging probe with a great dispersibility in biological media for biomedical applications. The fluorescent CNOs have been characterized by a variety of different analytical techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, spectroscopy (Raman, FT Infrared, Fluorescence) as well as microscopy. The internalization and cytotoxicity of the fluorescent labelled CNOs were analyzed in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Our results demonstrated that both cell lines accumulated the functionalized CNOs without any significant toxic effect on cell morphology and cell viability, showing a similar behavior to the untreated control cells. Moreover, confocal imaging shown that the functionalized CNOs present a high fluorescence intensity and localized partially in the lysosomes. Our findings confirm the excellent potentialities of these functionalized carbon nanomaterials as biocompatible platform for high-resolution biological imaging. References: [1] Bartelmess, J. et al. Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1980 [2] Giordani. et al. J. Mater. Chem. B 2014, 2, 2422 [3] Yang, M. et al. Small 2013, 9, 4194 [4] Bartelmess, J. et al. Nanoscale 2014, 6, 13761 [5] Frasconi, M. et al. Chem. Eur. J. 2015, 21, 19071 [6] d’Amora, M. et al. Scientific Reports 2016, 6, 33923 Acknowledgments: COST Action CA 15107 “Multi-Functional Nano-Carbon Composite Materials Network (MultiComp)”

K.IV.12
12:30 Lunch    
 
V. Frontier Nanomaterials: Inorganic, Organic & Bio (synthesized, immobilized, integrated) Nanoparticles : Keynote Session Chairs: Dr. Thomas Werzer, Dr. Nanasahed D.Thorat and Professor Reshef Tenne
13:30
Authors : Professor Reshef Tenne
Affiliations : Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100, Israel

Resume : Nanotubes and fullerene-like nanoparticles of WS2 and to some extent also MoS2 are produced now in large amounts and serve for numerous commercial applications, mostly as solid lubricants. The synthesis of different nanotubes from binary, ternary and even quaternary nanotubes has been advanced in recent years. In this short presentation some new studies involving individual WS2 nanotubes, like quasi-1D superconductivity, wetting and electromechanical resonators will be briefly described. In the second part of this talk new biomedical applications of the IF/INT will be briefly described. In particular lubrication of the entry/retrieval of medical devices, like catheters and laparoscopes by Re-doped IF nanoparticles; reduced encrustation of urological catheters and reinforcement of biocompatible polymers, like polyurethane, PVA and others will be discussed in light of new potential medical technologies.

K.V.1
14:00
Authors : Celine Muller, Julien Barthes, Vincent Ball, Nihal Engin Vrana
Affiliations : PROTIP Medical - 8, Place de l’Hôpital - 67000 Strasbourg - France

Resume : The temporal and spatial control of the delivery of bioactive molecules is an essential aspect of many therapeutic solutions to direct and modify biological events such as wound healing or modulation of the immune system after implantation. The choice of the delivery platform is also crucial because cells need a specific microenvironment in vivo. The release is generally controlled in a passive manner either via diffusion rate of the bioactive agent or through the degradation rate of the delivery systems. So we have designed an ECM mimicking membrane loaded with dopamine based nanoparticles which can be functionalized with bioactive molecules. Our films are prepared by spin-coating and are composed of gelatin and tyraminated hyaluronic acid. Two enzymatic crosslinking are performed to obtain an interpenetrating network. Our results showed that a slow release profile can be maintained for long periods (several weeks) without any cytotoxic effect on human cells. Nanoparticle enrichment of release platforms provides a fine control over the diffusion and partition behavior of bioactive molecules which can be harnessed for establishing long term gradient for applications such as tissue engineering Key words: nanoparticles, dopamine, controlled release, gelatin, thin films

K.V.2
14:15
Authors : Dr. Hélder A. SANTOS1 co-authors: Mónica P. A. Ferreira1, Sanjeev Ranjan2, Alexandra M. R. Correia1, Ermei M. Mäkilä3, Hongbo Zhang1, 5, Jarno J. Salonen3, Heikki J. Ruskoaho4, Anu J. Airaksinen2, Jouni T. Hirvonen1,
Affiliations : 1 Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland (http://www.helsinki.fi/~hsantos/ ) 2 Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland 3 Laboratory of Industrial Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Finland 4 Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Finland 5 School of Applied Science and Engineering, Harvard University, 02138, Cambridge MA, USA

Resume : Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current therapies have still limited rate of success, therefore novel/modified nanomaterials are emerging as promising alternatives for the treatment of heart diseases. Our lab has shown that porous silicon-based nanoparticles (PSi NPs) are promising biocompatible nanovectors for drug delivery applications [1−4]. Thus, in this work, we have successfully modified PSi NPs with heart-homing peptides to improve the cytocompatibility of the particles in primary cardiomyocytes, non-myocytes, and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, enhance their cellular uptake, and improve their accumulation in heart tissue in vivo in a myocardium infarcted (MI) rat model. The PSi NPs were modified with DOTA (D), heart-homing peptides (ANP, P2 and P3) were covalently conjugated to the NPs and, finally, the NPs were radiolabeled. In vitro studies evaluated the cellular viability and interactions. A MI rat model induced by isoprenaline injection was used to study the 111In labelled NPs after i.v. administration. The heart accumulation of the NPs was investigated by SPECT/CT. The safest concentrations of the NPs found in vitro were up to 50 µg/ml. Un-D-ANP NPs were internalized in higher amounts by primary cardiomyocytes, non-myocytes and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. A competition assay demonstrated that Un-D-ANP NPs were internalized via the guanylate cyclase A receptor in primary cardiomyocytes. Enhanced accumulation of the NPs was observed for all peptide-modified nanosystems in heart up to 3-fold. References: [1] Liu et al., J. Control. Release (2013), 170: 268. [2] Correia et al, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces (2015), 7: 23197. [3] Tölli et al., Biomaterials (2014) 35: 8394. [4] Ferreira et al., Biomaterials (2016) 94: 93.

K.V.3
14:30
Authors : Nanasaheb D. Thorat1 , Mohamed Radzi Noor2 , Tewfik Soulimane2and Syed A.M. Tofail1
Affiliations : 1 Department of Physics & Energy, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland 2Chemical & Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

Resume : Theranostic Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is a mitochondrial protein involved in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of cells. After Cyt c release into the cytosol, the caspase mediated apoptosis cascade is activated resulting in programmed cell death. This intrinsic property of Cyt c can be used to treat cancer. Herein, we explore the covalent immobilization of Cyt c into ordered mesoporous silica nanostructures for intracellular drug delivery of this theranostic cargo to colon cancer cells aiming at affording subsequent cell death. The targeted delivery of a functional apoptosis-initiating protein Cyt c to cancer cells, we formulated ordered silica nanostructures for the simultaneous encapsulation of cytochrome c and a cancer cell targeted aptamer AS1411 to colon cancer cells. The potential therapeutic property of these nanocargos was demonstrated by the induction of apoptosis upon intracellular delivery. The results clearly demonstrate that theranostic nanostructure upon formulation of a smart drug delivery system and upon delivery into cancer cells and highlight the general potential of this nanostructure in cancer therapy.

K.V.4
14:45
Authors : Raghvendra A Bohara*1,2 Nanasaheb D. Thorat ,3 and Shivaji H. Pawar2
Affiliations : 1 Research and Innovations Centre for comprehensive health care Interdisciplinary Research, D.Y. Patil University, Kolhapur, India 2Centre for Interdisciplinary Research D.Y. Patil University, Kolhapur, India 3 Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

Resume : In the present study, a facile synthesis route was developed to prepare surface functionalized superparamagnetic Cobalt zinc ferrite (CZF) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by using triethylene glycol (TEG) as reducing agent and surface modifier ligand. Initially structural, morphological, and magnetic characterization were carried out in order to confirm their size, poly dispersity, colloidal stability, and magnetic property. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of triethylene glycol (TEG) on the surface of CZF MNPs. The CZF MNPs are of superparamagnetic in nature with high saturation magnetization, good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR), and excellent biocompatibility. All these properties are crucial, for their use as nanomedicine in cancer theranostics such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatment; which is considered as one of the most promising cancer therapy. The prepared CZF MNPs are found biocompatible with MCF7 (human breast cancer) and L929 (mouse fibroblast) cell lines and Vero cell line (monkey kidney cell line), when tested by MTT and SRB assays. Cell particle interaction was studied in depth, by using multiple staining techniques combined with confocal microscopy. Finally, an In vitro hyperthermia experiment was carried on MCF7 cells, resulting in death of MCF7 cells up to 80% within 60 min. The research demonstrates that, the prepared CZF MNPs can be used as a potential candidate for effective MFH treatment for cancer cell death. Reference: 1. R.A. Bohara, N.D. Thorat, A.K. Chaurasia, S.H. Pawar, RSC Adv., 5, 47225 (2015) Corresponding Author: Raghvendra A Bohara

K.V.5
15:00
Authors : Thomas Werzer, Christian Zafiu, Tristan Oliver Nagy, Günter Trettenhahn, Uwe Bernd Sleytr, Wolfgang Kautek
Affiliations : University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Complex Systems, D-52428 Jülich, Germany; University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, NanoBioTechnology, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, A-1090 Vienna, Austria

Resume : Surface layer proteins form regular 2-D crystalline arrays in the nanometer regime (S-layers) on solid substrates by self-assembling singular protein units that are cross-linked with calcium ions. An outstanding feature of S-layers is that their assembly and morphology can be electrochemically controlled and manipulated.[1-5] Moreover, S-layers can serve as biointerfaces that exhibit excellent antifouling properties.[6] The controlled orientation of S-layers for the formation of cytophobic and cytophilic recrystallized monolayers on glass supports has been reported recently.[7] In this study the influence of chaotropic and kosmotropic ions on the dynamics and the mechanism of the adsorption process of S-layer proteins of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 were investigated by electrochemical in situ techniques (EQCM, FT-IRRAS, AFM). [1] M. Handrea, M. Sahre, A. Neubauer, U.B. Sleytr, W. Kautek, Bioelectrochemistry 61 (2003) 1. [2] U.B. Sleytr, M. Sara, W. Kautek, EP 1 402 055 B1 (2007). [3] C. Zafiu, G. Trettenhahn, D. Pum, U.B. Sleytr, W. Kautek, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 (2011) 3478. [4] C. Zafiu, G. Trettenhahn, D. Pum, U.B. Sleytr, W. Kautek, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 (2011) 13232. [5] C. Zafiu, T. Werzer, G. Trettenhahn, D. Pum, U.B. Sleytr, W. Kautek, J. Phys. Chem. C 118 (2014) 29860. [6] M.M. Picher, S. Küpcü, C.-J. Huang, J. Dostalek, D. Pum, U.B. Sleytr, P. Ertl, Lab Chip 13 (2013) 1780 [7] M. Rothbauer, S. Küpcü, D. Sticker, U.B. Sleytr, P. Ertl, ACS Nano 7 (2013) 8020

K.V.6
15:15
Authors : C. Joyce (1), T. K. Georgiou (2), F. Xie (2)
Affiliations : (1) Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, SW72AZ, London, UK (2) Department of Materials, Imperial College London, SW72AZ, London, UK

Resume : Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a novel, non-invasive method for cancer treatment in which there is significant research interest in further developing. Effective PTT agents must be biocompatible, highly selective, stable and photosensitive. Its optical absorbance must be in the near infra-red region, which is capable of penetrating through biological tissue. To this end, this investigation aims to design and synthesise novel nanoparticles, combining a polymer core, a gold shell and a block copolymer coating, which would result in a highly tuneable PTT agent. To date, the only methods used to modify the optical properties of gold nanostars have been to alter their size and degree of branching, while no investigation has examined whether varying the refractive index of the core will have an impact. As such, in this investigation, multiple polymer cores, of varying refractive indices, will be synthesised and their effect on the optical properties of both gold nanospheres and nanostars will be analysed. In addition to this, an in-house synthesised amphiphilic copolymer will be used to coat the nanoparticles to increase stability, selectivity and biocompatibility for potential in vitro and in vivo studies. The optical properties and heating efficiencies of all nanoparticles created in this study will be compared. Keywords: theranostics; refractive index; amphiphilic copolymer

K.V.7
15:45 Coffee Break. General Photo    
16:00
Authors : Marta Laranjeira, Fernando Jorge Monteiro
Affiliations : 1- i3S- Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Portugal 2- INEB- Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica, Divisão de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto 3- Faculdade de Engenharia, DEMM, Universidade do Porto, Portugal

Resume : The development of intelligent stimuli responsive theranostic system that can detect and treat cancer at its early stage is an emerging area in the field of nanobiotechnology. Multiple imaging agents that combine, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with optical imaging, can be used at the same time as a drug delivery agent. In this work mesoporous silica coated Gd based nanoparticles with enhanced biosafety were successfully prepared. Results showed that nanoparticles were homogeneous regarding chemical composition, silica layer thickness, total size and morphology. By simply varying the reaction parameters mesopore sizes, surface area and pore volume could be adjusted for enhanced adsorption and release of different anti-cancer drugs. This strategy will allow surpassing active cancer drugs poor specificity and dose-limiting toxicities during chemotherapy.

K.V.8
16:10
Authors : Saqlain A Shah*, MU Aslam Khan, MU Hashmi, K Javed, M Naeem, M Arshad
Affiliations : Department of Physics, Forman Christian College (University) Lahore Paksitan Materials Science & Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA, USA Polymer Engineering & Technology, University of the Punjab, Lahore Pakistan Department of Applied Sciences, Superior University, Lahore Pakistan Department of Physics, International Islamic University, Islamabad Pakistan Nanoscience division, National Center for Physics, Islamabad Pakistan

Resume : Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a favorite material to be used in biomedical applications owing to its remarkable magnetic properties and suitable biocompatibility & biodegradability. It has been widely studies as a material of choice for magnetic hyperthermia therapy, controlled drug delivery, magnetic separation and as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent [1-2]. Under an oscillating magnetic field magnetite nanoparticles generate heat due to Néel losses and Brownian rotations in physiological fluids [3]. Magnetite nanoparticles also respond to certain visible light wavelengths near infrared region and are excited upon irradiation. During de-excitation it releases extra energy into molecular vibration modes that transform into thermal energy [4]. Current study is about combining the magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal therapies into a single bimodal system for cancer therapy. The synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were superparamagnetic having appropriate colloidal stability due to being coated with polyethylene glycol. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were studied on HeLa cells using MTT assay and proteome apoptosis kit. They were subjected to an oscillating magnetic field of 375 kHz & 170 Oe for hyperthermia. For photothermal therapy, the system was irradiated with a laser emitting 808 nm wavelength which is a near infrared regime in electromagnetic spectrum. The two treatments were performed separately as well as in combination and the combined treatment was multifold more effective in treating the cancer cells as compared to separate sessions. References [1] K.M. Krishnan, IEEE Trans. Magn. 46, 2523 (2010). [2] S.A. Shah, K.M. Krishnan, et al., Phys. Rev. B, 92, 094438 (2015). [3] S.A. Shah, et al., Mater. Chem. Phys, 137, 365 (2012). [4] M. Chu, Y. Shao, et al., Biomaterials, 34, 4078 (2013).

K.V.9
16:20
Authors : A. Al-Kattan(1), V. P. Nirwan(2), E. Munnier(3), I. Chourpa(3), A. Fahmi(2) and A. V. Kabashin(1)
Affiliations : (1) Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, Campus de Luminy, Case 917, 13288, Marseille cedex 9, France. (2) Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Technology and Bionics, Marie-Curie Strase 1, 47533 Kleve, Germany. (3) François-Rabelais University, E.A. 6295 "Nanomedicaments et Nanosondes", 37200 Tours, France.

Resume : Bare laser-synthesized Au and Si nanoparticles (AuNPs and SiNPs) gather exemplary physicochemical properties for advanced imaging and therapeutic modalities. Here, we explore the feasibility to functionalize electrospun hybrids nanofibers based-on chitosan(PEO) with bare-NPs, employed as additives for projected applications in tissue engineering. We report the possibility to graft bare-NPs on fiber surface via electrostatic interaction ensured between polycationic surface of nanofibers and negative charge surface of NPs, offering thus additional anchoring interaction sites with biological tissues. No interference was observed on chemical composition of chitosan(PEO) nanofibers. Moreover, the functionalization of nanofibers with bare-NPs leads to quite different diameter fibers, suggesting potential improvement of fiber surface reactivity. We also show, throughout thermal analyses that bare-NPs confer thermal stability at higher temperature and can be potentially explore for controlled drug release. Finally, biological properties of the nanofibers were assessed through preliminary viability tests conducted on HaCaT cells. After 24 h of incubation time, no adverse effects were observed confirming the biocombatibilty of the hybrides nanofibers. As first encouraging attempt, the proposed concept promises exciting perspectives in the development of innovative mutifunctional platforms gathering new properties for tissue engineering field.

K.V.10
16:40
Authors : Tolga Tarkan Olmez, Esra Yuca, Erol Eyupoglu, Hazal Beril Catalak, Ozgur Sahin, Urartu O. S. Seker
Affiliations : Tolga Tarkan Olmez; Dr. Esra Yuca; Hazal Beril Catalak; Prof. Ozgur Sahin; Prof. Urartu O. S. Seker, UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 06800, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey Dr. Esra Yuca, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey Erol Eyupoglu; Prof. Ozgur Sahin, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Science, 06800 Bilkent University, Ankara

Resume : Formation of biological materials is a well-controlled process by biomolecules especially by proteins. Proteins can control nucleation and mineralization of biomaterials, thereby forming the hard tissues of biological organism such as bones, teeth and shells. In this study design, implementation of multifunctional designer proteins is demonstrated for fluorescent silica micro/nanoparticles synthesis. R5 motif of silaffin polypeptide which is known for its silicification capability was fused genetically into three different fluorescent proteins with the intention of forming modified fluorescent proteins. R5 peptide domain served as a robust and cheaper purification tag for the proteins in addition to providing silica synthesis at ambient conditions. Three functional fusion constructs have been designed, including GFP-R5, YFP-R5 and mCherry-R5. R5 peptide tag was exploited to purify fluorescence proteins through silica gel resin and later synthesis of bioluminescent silica particles. Bio-enabled particles are found biocompatible for usage in novel biomedical and biomaterial applications.

K.V.11
16:50
Authors : Hui-Wen Chen, Chen-Yu Huang, Shu-Yi Lin, Zih-Syun Fang, Chen-Hsuan Hsu, Jung-Chen Lin, Yuan-I Chen, Bing-Yu Yao, Che-Ming J. Hu
Affiliations : Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; Research Center for Nanotechnology and Infectious Diseases, Taipei, Taiwan

Resume : The ongoing battle against current and rising viral infectious threats has prompted increasing effort in the development of vaccine technology. A major thrust in vaccine research focuses on developing formulations with virus-like features towards enhancing antigen presentation and immune processing. Herein, a facile approach to formulate synthetic virus-like particles (sVLPs) is demonstrated by exploiting the phenomenon of protein corona formation induced by the high-energy surfaces of synthetic nanoparticles. Using an avian coronavirus spike protein as a model antigen, sVLPs were prepared by incubating 100 nm gold nanoparticles in a solution containing an optimized concentration of viral proteins. Following removal of free proteins, antigen-laden particles were recovered and showed morphological semblance to natural viral particles under nanoparticle tracking analysis and transmission electron microscopy. As compared to inoculation with free proteins, vaccination with the sVLPs showed enhanced lymphatic antigen delivery, stronger antibody titers, increased splenic T-cell response, and reduced infection-associated symptoms in an avian model of coronavirus infection. Comparison to a commercial whole inactivated virus vaccine also showed evidence of superior antiviral protection by the sVLPs. The study demonstrates a simple yet robust method in bridging viral antigens with synthetic nanoparticles for improved vaccine application; it has practical implications in the management of human viral infections as well as in animal agriculture.

K.V.12
17:00
Authors : Marko Pavlovic, Paul Rouster and Istvan Szilagyi
Affiliations : Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.

Resume : Layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CO3-LDH) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation and utilized as a support for superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD). Structural properties of the obtained materials were probed by X-ray diffraction experiments, several spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, fluorescence), TEM and SEM, while colloidal stability and electrophoretic properties were investigated by time-resolved dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis. At appropriate loading, SOD adsorbs quantitatively on the surface of LDH due to the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Obtained material exhibited strong enzymatic activity with moderate resistance to salt induced aggregation. By coating this material with heparin, novel hybrid nanomaterial was obtained. Both processes, adsorption of SOD and coating by the biopolymer, were completely harmless to the 3D structure of the enzyme. Dispersion of this type of coated material exhibited excellent colloidal stability due to electrostatic and steric stabilisation. In addition, the nanocomposites showed significant SOD activity1. In summary, the designed hybrid nanomaterials are a suitable candidate for applications, wherever stable dispersions of antioxidant activity are required for instance in biomedical treatments or in chemical manufacturing processes. References : 1. Pavlovic M.; Rouster P.; Szilagyi I., Synthesis and formulation of functional bionanomaterials with superoxide dismutase activity. Nanoscale. 2017, 9, 369–379.

K.V.13
17:10
Authors : Jarno Salonen1, Nathan J. Gimbar2, Haibo Yu3, Mark Aindow3, Ermei Mäkilä1 and Kurt W. Kolasinski2
Affiliations : 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland; 2 Department of Chemistry, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 USA; 3 Department of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT USA

Resume : Regenerative electroless etching (ReEtching) is a method of producing nanostructured semiconductors in which an oxidant (Ox1) is capable of initiating etching by injecting holes into the semiconductor valence band and a second oxidant (Ox2), which would be unreactive in the primary reaction, is used to regenerate Ox1. Thereby the extent and the rate of reaction are controlled by the amount and rate of Ox2 added in the process. This general strategy is demonstrated specifically for the production of highly luminescent, porous Si from the reaction of V2O5 in HF(aq) as Ox1 and H2O2(aq) as Ox2 with Si powder, chunks and wafers. Numerous applications of nanostructured silicon, e.g. consumer products, nanomedicine and biosensing, would benefit from economical production of porous powder on the kilogram to ton scale. However, that has been infeasible up until now because of the uncontrollable electroless etching processes. The new ReEtching method overcomes the problem and may be used in an industrial level production of mesoporous silicon. In addition to a feasible large-scale production of different kind of nanostructured Si structures, ReEtching can also be used to pre-anodized mesoporous silicon powder. The result is stunningly bright and persistent photoluminescence due to much smaller quantum-confined structures within the mesopores produced by ReEtching, also enabling biosensing, diagnostic and even theranostic use of ReEtched particles.

K.V.14
17:20
Authors : Mualla Öner1, Gülnur Kizil1 , Gülsah Keskin1, Melike Şatıroğlu1, Rabia Seydioğlu1 , Celine Pochat2, Mikhael Bechelany2
Affiliations : 1 Yildiz Technical University Chemical-Metallurgical Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul, Turkey 2 Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France

Resume : Most synthetic plastics are derived from fossil resources and nondegradable. The increased use of plastics over the years has resulted in increases in waste that have become significant concerns because of their negative impacts on the environment. With the growing concerns towards the environment, many academic and industrial researchers are investigating to develop non-petroleum-based and sustainable feedstocks [1-2]. Recent advances in polymeric composite science offers significant opportunities for new, improved green materials from renewable resources that are optionally recyclable, biocompatible, and biodegradable, thereby enhancing global sustainability [3-4]. In that respect bio-based polymeric composites are attracting a great deal of attention because of the inherent advantages of these polymers such as biodegradability, low toxicity, easy availability, economy and the control of carbon dioxide emissions that lead to global warming. The goal of this study focuses on the improvement of Poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-valerate), PHBV properties so it can be effectively used for different applications as well as maintaining its biodegradability. PHBV, is a biodegradable polymer which is formed in bacterial cells as an energy reservoir. To achieve this goal, boron nitride was used to enhance polymer properties. Boron nitride (BN) is a ceramic material with attractive physical properties. Our results showed that the PHBV/BN nanocomposites exhibited promising improvement in various properties. Acknowledgements M. Öner thanks the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Project No. 215M355), and M.Bechelany thanks the Campus France (PHC Bosphore No.35211XD) for funding this work under a Bilateral Cooperation Program between Turkey and France. References 1. C. K. Williams and M. A. Hillmyer, Polym. Rev., 2008, 48, 1–10. 2. A. Shah, F. Hasan, A. Hameed and S. Ahmed, Biotechnol. Adv., 2008, 26, 246–265. 3. M. Öner, A. A. Çöl, C. Pochat-Bohatier and M. Bechelany, RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 90973–90981. 4. N. Tenn, N. Follain, J. Soulestin, R. Cretois, S. Bourbigot and S. Marais, J. Phys. Chem. C, 2013, 117(23), 12117–12135.

K.V.15
 
POSTER SESSION. NEW FRONTIERS IN NANOCARBONS : Chairs Dr. Nikos Tsierkezos (TU Ilmenau, Germany) and Dr. Oleksandr Ivanyuta (TSN University of Kyiv, Ukraine)
17:30
Authors : Ivanyuta O., Kysil O.(1), Tsierkezos N. (2), Ritter U. (2), Scharff P.(2), Buzaneva E.(1)
Affiliations : (1)TSN University of Kyiv, Volodymyrska str. 64, 01601 Kyiv,Ukraine, (2)TU of Ilmenau, Institute for Chemistry and Biotechnology, 98684 Ilmenau, Germany

Resume : Learning how to modify of nanocarbon materials surface (nanotubes, fullerenes) by design bioactive surface is one of most challenging problems in functional biointerface nanoscience and nanotechnology. Meeting this challenge requires selection of individual modifed molecular components and artful control of how these molecules are arranged and interacted developing biosensing principles. Previous our investigation in the area of chemical modeling of surface modification of carbon nanotubes and fullerols with useful properties and coordination chemistry of transition metal azole complexes gave beginning for research in the field. We propose the new approach for modelling of surface modification of these nanocarbons by self-assembled supramolecular architectures based on azole complexes of transition metals, which are compatible with biomolecules. This model was confirms by UV-vis, IR spectroscopy, EPR and AFM investigation. Such modified nanocarbon surface by metal - azole complexes provided the necessary information to analyze the possibility use of new materials in biosensor systems. The next stage of the study supramolecules is photoexcitation complex with amino acids, which change the coordination environment of metal and the absorption spectra due to d - d transitions shifts. As a result, received experiments are confirmed of a "smart" supramolecule that recognizes protein amino acids.Asknowledgement: thanks Liliana Lukashuk as chemist for proposed models, supported experiments and discussions.

K.PIV.1
17:30
Authors : Oh Hyeong Kwon1, Seo Hee Han1, Young-Gwang Ko1, Donghwan Cho1, Won Ho Park2, Won Il Kim3
Affiliations : 1Kumoh National Institute of Technology; 2Chungnam National University; 3Wonbiogen Co., Ltd.

Resume : Dressings for human wounds have been aimed at protection, removal of exudate, inhibition of exogenous microorganism invasion, and improved appearance. Bacterial colonization or infection prevents healing of wounds and burns, resulting in delayed healing and potential conversion of the wound to a chronic state. Silver is important in the treatment of wounds due to its anti-microbial properties, and is therefore commonly used in the treatment of major burn injuries where bacterial infection is common. Development of advanced wound dressings that possess anti-microbial properties of wound surface and absorbed exudate to facilitate wound healing process is challenging study. Activated carbons are the most widely used industrial adsorbent for removing contaminants from gaseous, aqueous, and non-aqueous streams. Most of foam dressings are made from polyurethane (PU). Because PU foams contain a number of small pores that have the ability to pull exudate away from the wound bed. In this study, we fabricated anti-microbial PU foams containing silver nanoparticles and activated carbon. Then, the mechanical property, moisture absorption speed, absorptivity, morphology and cell viability of the composite foam were characterized. PU foams containing silver nanoparticles and activated carbon showed effective wound healing property compared to controls. Now, wound closure experiment for infected wound by bacteria is in progress.

K.PIV.2
17:30
Authors : P. O. Andrade 1, M. A. V. M. Grinet 2, A. M. E. Santo 1, E. J. Corat 3, MM. M. Costa 2, A. O. Lobo 2
Affiliations : 1 Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Science and Technology, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil; 2 University of Vale do Paraiba (Univap), Institute of Research and Development (IP&D), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil; 3 National Institute for Space Research (INPE-LAS), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

Resume : Biomimetic materials are promising to bone tissue engineering due to their similarities with natural components of extracellular matrix. The potential applications of polymeric nanofibers have attracted the attention of several investigations because they usually show low toxicity, are biocompatible and biodegradable. However, polymeric nanofibers present unappropriated mechanical properties for bone tissue regeneration. For this reason, incorporated ceramic nanoparticles are largely used as scaffold in biological hard tissue growth. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are used also as scaffolds in cellular growth in vitro improving the tenacity of the implanted material. The combination of these materials to the development of new biomaterial is very attractive for many applications. Therefore, the current project aims the production of new hybrid material by i) multi layered hydrophilic carbon nanotubes (CNT-O2) produced by plasma assisted vapor deposition, ii) hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHA) produced by electrodeposition and simulated body fluid immersion, and iii) Poly-acid lactic (PLA) nanofibers. The physical and biological properties of the new biomaterial were characterized. We succeed to obtain nHA/CNT-O2/PLA hybrid nanocomposites potentially applied to bone tissue regeneration.

K.PIV.3
17:30
Authors : H. HAKAN GÜREL, B. SALMANKURT
Affiliations : Kocaeli University, Technology Faculty, Department of Information Systems Engineering, Kocaeli;Sakarya University, Department of Physics, Sakarya,

Resume : Graphene has attracted strong scientific and technological interest in recent years. It has shown great promise in many applications, such as electronics, energy storage and conversion (supercapacitors, batteries, fuel cells, solar cells), and bioscience/biotechnologies because of its unique physicochemical and electronic properties such as high surface area (theoretically 2630 m2/g for single-layer graphene), excellent thermal and electric conductivity, and strong mechanical strength. Graphene also has numerous potential applications in biotechnology, including biosensing, disease diagnostics, antibacterial and antiviral materials, cancer targeting and photo thermal therapy, drug delivery, electrical stimulation of cells, and tissue engineering. Interactions of amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, and small molecules with graphene and carbon nanotubes are well studied using experimental and theoretical techniques. These studies indicate that noncovalent interactions such as π−π stacking and X−π (X = CH, OH, NH, etc.) stabilize the nucleobase and amino acid complexes of grapheme. Despite the importance of biomolecules–graphene interactions, a detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanism and features of biomolecules onto the surfaces of graphene is lacking. It is required the immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of graphene for design and production of bioelectronics devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. Better understanding of interaction between amino acids with these 2D surfaces will provide better understanding of same interaction mechanisms for peptides and proteins. Because of its crucial biological roles such as cell and tissue remodeling, it makes possible to gain new know how. At the same time, the track and detection of amino acids will provide detection of several diseases by using biosensors. As an example, it is possible to diagnosis of malaria disease by detecting Histedine and diagnosis of several cancer types and Parkinson’s disease by detecting Leucine. In this work, we have performed density functional theory (DFT) with vdW-DF method calculations for exploring the adsorption geometries, adsorption energies, electronic band structures and adsorption dynamics of Histidine and Leucine (model amino acid)/graphene composite system. We also investigate the stability of the system via molecular dynamics simulations both vacuum and aqueous environment. It is also shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of amino acids on graphene by applied charging and perpendicular electric field.

K.PIV.4
17:30
Authors : O. A. Kraevaya (1), A. S. Peregudov (2), S. I. Troyanov (3), A. A. Kushch (4), D. Schols (5), P. A. Troshin (6,1)
Affiliations : (1) Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Semenov ave 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow region, 142432, Russia; (2) A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds of Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Vavylova st. 28, B-334, Moscow, 119991, Russia; (3) Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskie gory 1, Moscow, 119991, Russia; (4) Honored Academician N.F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center for Epidemiologyand Microbiology of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Gamaleya st. 18, 123098, Moscow, Russia; (5) Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, B-3000, Leuven, Belgium; (6) Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel St. 3, Moscow, 143026, Russia

Resume : Chlorofullerene C60Cl6 is known as a versatile precursor for synthesis of various water-soluble fullerene derivatives [1-4]. It is known, in particular, that Friedel-Crafts arylation of C60Cl6 leads to the formation of C60R5Cl derivatives bearing the appended fragments of arylalkylcarboxylic acids showing advanced biological properties [5]. However, these compounds are synthesized under harsh conditions using toxic nitrobenzene as a solvent and the product yields are disappointedly low. To solve the aforementioned issues, we have applied esters of thiophenylalkylcarboxylic acids for functionalization of C60Cl6, which resulted in the formation of C60R5Cl, C60R5H, C60R6 and other derivatives depending on the precursor structure and the reaction conditions. The selectivity of these reactions were approaching 80% in some cases. Using highly reactive thiophene-based reagents allowed us to perform the syntheses under mild conditions and apply 1,2-dichlorobenzene instead of toxic nitrobenzene as a solvent. Cleavage of the ester groups allowed us to prepare a series of novel water-soluble fullerene derivatives. Antiviral activity and toxicity of the prepared compounds will be discussed. 1. A. A. Yurkova et al, Chem. Commun., 2012, 71, 8916 2. A. B. Kornev et al, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 5461 3. E. A. Khakina et al, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 7158 4. E. A. Khakina et al, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6OB02251K 5. O. A. Troshina et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2007, 5, 2783

K.PIV.5
17:30
Authors : Massimo Trusel,a, Michele Baldrighi,b, Roberto Marotta,c, Marco Frasconi,b,Tiziano Catelani,c, Raffaella Tonini,a, and Silvia Giordani,b,d
Affiliations : a) Neuroscience and Brain Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30 – 16163 Genova, Italy b) Nano Carbon Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30 – 16163 Genova, Italy c) Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30 – 16163 Genova, Italy d) Chemistry Department, Università di Torino, via Giuria 7, 10125, Turin, Italy

Resume : In order to probe the possible applications of graphitic Carbon Nano Onions (CNOs) as a platform for the diagnosis and treatment of Central Nervous System (CNS) pathologies, fluorescently labelled CNOs were stereotaxically injected in vivo in mice hippocampus. Their diffusion within brain tissues and their cellular localization were analyzed ex vivo by confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and correlative light-electron microscopy techniques. Results indicate that the diffusion of CNOs occurred from the injection site to the surrounding CNS tissues. Efficient internalization of the nanomaterial is evidenced from the fluorescence staining of neuronal cells populations. The CNOs injection produced no detectable toxicity over neuronal signal conduction. Moreover, no adverse effects on mice behavior were evidenced as well as confirmed from electrophysiology and behavioral studies performed on treated mice. These results give robust confirmation of the Carbon Nano Onions ability to interface with several cell types, and pave the way to their development as possible brain diseases-targeted diagnostics and/or therapeutics nano carriers. Acknowledgments: COST Action CA 15107 “Multi-Functional Nano-Carbon Composite Materials Network (MultiComp)”

K.PIV.6
17:30
Authors : Francisco Morales-Lara(a,b), Jinhua Sun(c), Francesca Cardano(a), Michele Baldrighi(a), Francisco Palazon(d), Alexandr Talyzin(c), Marco Frasconi(e) and Silvia Giordani(a,f). e-mail: silvia.giordani@iit.it
Affiliations : (a) Nano Carbon Materials, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego, 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy. (b) Graphene Labs, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego, 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy. (c) Department of Physics, Umeå universitet, Linnaeus väg, 24, 901 87, Umeå, Sweeden. (d) Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego, 30, 16163, Genoa, Italy. (e) Department of Chemical Sciencies, University of Padova, via Marzolo, 1, 35122, Padova, Italy. (f) Chemistry Department, Università di Torino, via Giuria, 7, 10125, Turin, Italy.

Resume : Graphene oxide (GO) has shown great potential for many applications where electrical conductivity is not required and, on the contrary of single layer graphene, its preparation can be scaled up to high quantities. The oxygen-containing groups on its surface render it dispersible in water, and thus easier to manipulate, while allowing further chemical functionalization on the material. The assembly of 2D materials into 3D architectures can be a useful solution to make accessible the high surface area of these materials for storage of different types of molecules such as gases, drugs, etc. The objective of this work was to build a mesostructured 3D material made of graphene oxide layers separated by rigid tridimensional pillars. For this purpose, we used 4-(aminophenyl)methane (TKAm) as pillaring units and we proved our concept over both a commercial Hummers’ GO and a lab-made Hummers’ GO. Also, we tested two different reaction conditions for the functionalization of GO. One consisted in dispersing the GO monolayers into water so that the amine groups of TKAm linkers can have access to the α-carbon of the epoxy groups situated on the basal planes of GO [1]. The other approach consisted in exploiting the swelling properties of GO in polar organic solvents [2]. Thus, a solvothermal synthesis in methanol as solvent was tested. In both cases, the XRD analysis showed the formation of a pillared GO-based material with an interlayer distance of ~14 Å, which is 6-7 Å higher than that of pristine graphite oxide. By operating under solvothermal synthesis conditions, we were able to obtain a material with specific surface area (SSA) up to 13 times higher (660 m2/g) than that of the pristine GO. [1] W. Gao, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2010, 39, 61–95. [2] M. V. Korobov, A. V. Talyzin, A. T. Rebrikova, E. A. Shilayeva, N. V. Avramenko, A. N. Gagarin and N. B. Ferapontov, Carbon N. Y., 2016, 102, 297–303.

K.PIV.7
 
POSTER SESSION. Frontiers Multifunctional Nanomaterias : Chairs :Dr.Thomas Werzer and Dr. Nanasahed D.Thorat
17:40
Authors : So Yeong Bahn1, Byung Hoon Jo2, Yoo Seong Choi3*, and Hyung Joon Cha1*
Affiliations : 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 37673, Korea; 2Division of Life Science and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52828, Korea; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 34134, Korea

Resume : Molluscan nacre is a fascinating biomineral consisting of a highly organized calcium carbonate composite that provides unique fracture toughness and an iridescent color. Organisms elaborately control the biomineralization using organic macromolecules. A matrix protein Pif80 was discovered in the nacreous layer of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and that has been regarded as an essential component to induce and regulate nacre formation. In this study, the gene encoding Pif80 was genetically redesigned for the recombinant production in Escherichia coli system, and the recombinant Pif80 (rPif80) was successfully expressed and purified. Through interactions with calcium ions, rPif80 induced the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate granules and stabilized these granules by forming calcium ion-induced coacervates. Under nacre calcification condition, the amorphous mineral precursors were destabilized by the re-dissolution of rPif80 coacervates, resulting in the growth of nacre-like nanogranular aragonite on the polysaccharide substrate. Our findings can give potential to understand biomineralization mechanism of nacre and to fabricate nacre-mimicking notable materials.

K.PV.1
17:40
Authors : Mualla Öner1, Gülnur Kizil1 , Gülsah Keskin1, Melike Şatıroğlu1, Rabia Seydioğlu1 , Celine Pochat2, Mikhael Bechelany2
Affiliations : 1 Yildiz Technical University Chemical-Metallurgical Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul, Turkey 2 Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier, France

Resume : Over the past century, fossil fuel-based nonrenewable based polymers which are used extensively have created a lot of environmental problems. Because of these environmental concerns, there is naturally a great desire to find new resources and materials to replace petroleum-based materials. So in the last several decades there have been expanding research efforts focusing on new bio-based materials with high performance [1-3]. Biodegradable polymers are alternative materials for this solution, which have been developed and implemented in many areas. Poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-valerate), PHBV, is a biodegradable polymer which is formed in bacterial cells as an energy reservoir. However, some inherent properties of PHBV restrict the use of this polymer for a wide range of applications. Therefore, the modification of biodegradable PHBV polymer through innovative processing technology is an important task. Ongoing efforts to improve properties and performance of bioplastics are driven by wider market acceptance. In this study, PHBV based nanobiocomposites (PHBV/BN) were prepared with the incorporation of the various percentage of nano boron nitride (BN). The structure of PHBV/BN nanobiocomposites was investigated by FTIR, XRD and SEM. XRD and DSC studies showed an increase in crystallinity due to the addition of BN. TGA analysis showed improvement in thermal degradation behavior of the composites with an increase in boron nitride concentration. The oxygen and water barrier properties of PHBV/BN nanobiocomposites were measured. A substantial reduction in oxygen and water permeability due to increase in boron nitride loading was observed. Moreover, BN has been shown to contribute to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Acknowledgements M. Öner thanks the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Project No. 215M355), and M.Bechelany thanks the Campus France (PHC Bosphore No.35211XD) for funding this work under a Bilateral Cooperation Program between Turkey and France. References 1.J. M. Raquez, Y. Habibi, M. Murariu and P. Dubois, Prog.Polym. Sci., 2013, 38, 1504–1542. 2. M. Öner, A. A. Çöl, C. Pochat-Bohatier and M. Bechelany, RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 90973–90981. 2. N. Tenn, N. Follain, J. Soulestin, R. Cretois, S. Bourbigot and S. Marais, J. Phys. Chem. C, 2013, 117(23), 12117–12135. 3. V. Siracusa, P. Rocculi, S. Romani and M. D. Rosa, Trends Food Sci. Technol., 2008, 19, 634–643. 4. G. Braunegg, L. Gilles and F. G. Klaus, J. Biotechnol., 1998, 65(2), 127–161.

K.PV.2
17:40
Authors : Cornelia Nichita1,2, Adriana Balan1, Faisal Al-Behadili1 and Ioan Stamatin1
Affiliations : Cornelia Nichita1,2, Adriana Balan1, Faisal Al-Behadili1 and Ioan Stamatin1 1University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 3Nano-SAE Research Centre PO Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania 2 National Institute for Chemical-Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 112 Vitan Street, 031299, Bucharest, Romania, e-mail: cornelianichita@yahoo.com

Resume : The aim of this study is the encapsulation of the polyphenolic compounds loaded on the crosslinked chitosan using various methods: self-crosslinking in high density ultrasonic field, ionic gelation. Such drug delivery systems show enhanced stability, solubility and protection from physical and chemical degradation with improved bioavailability to the gut and hepatic level. The contribution focused on the antioxidant properties of the polyphenols loaded on the chitosan nanoparticles and it is shown that the capacity of the free radicals scavenging rate is dependent of shape and the spongy structure induced by cross-linking in chitosan nanoparticles. In addition, the spongy structure is in direct relation with the loading capacity of the polyphenols.The antioxidant effect of the chitosan nanoparticles, polyphenolic compounds and of the biocomposites have been investigated in vitro non cellular by chemiluminescence and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) methods. In addition, atomic force microscopy AFM and UV-Vis reveal a series of properties such as spectral characteristics and specific topography. DLS was used to measure the hydrodynamic size and polydispersity index Keywords: drug delivery nano systems, chitosan nanobiopolymers, polyphenolic compounds, antioxidant effect

K.PV.3
17:40
Authors : Cornelia Nichita1,2, Georgeta Neagu2, Adriana Balan1 , Ana Cucu1 , Catalin Ceaus1 and Ioan Stamatin1
Affiliations : 1University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 3Nano-SAE Research Centre PO Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania 2 National Institute for Chemical-Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 112 Vitan Avenue, 031299, Bucharest, Romania, e-mail: cornelianichita@yahoo.com

Resume : Silver nanoparticles has been recognized as an antimicrobial component in therapeutic treatment for many years. There is increasing evidence that silver nanoparticles can promote wound healing and may also possess anti-inflammatory properties. Also, medicinal plants are a natural source of various pharmaceutical products with different biological activities offering treatment for several diseases. Herbal extract is a complex mixture of compounds, which can have antibiotic, antiviral, anticancer, antifungal, anti-inflamatory properties. Furthermore, association betwen silver nanoparticles and herbal extracts, can lead to a new biohybrids with enhanced therapeutic efficiency. The aims of the current paper were (i) to realize a new design for nano biohybrids based on silver nanoparticles and herbal extracts (ii) to evaluate the silver nanoparticles alone (iii) to evaluate the silver nanoparticles with surface modified by functionalization with various herbal extracts (aqueous, hydro alcoholic extracts and plants oils). In order to achieve this study were investigated hydrodynamic size, polydispersity index and zeta potential by dynamic light scattering technique and a series of properties such as spectral characteristics and specific topography by UV-Vis and AFM atomic force microscopy. In addition the viability of cells were detected by MTS - assay that emphasize significant stimulation of the growth of mouse fibroblast 3T3 in a dose-dependent manner. Keywords: Nano biohybrids, silver nanoparticles, herbal extracts

K.PV.4
17:40
Authors : Prakash Manandhar and Joong Ho Moon*
Affiliations : Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199, United States

Resume : The structure-function relationship of conjugated polymers (CPs) interacting with various biologically active materials is of prime interest as the physical and biophysical properties of the complexes required for many applications are closely related to the nature of self-assembly. In this presentation, we report substantial structural differences of a set of four CPs containing the same positively charged side chains, which only different in the backbone chemical structure and connectivity, upon complexation with linear polyanion, glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Electronic spectroscopic data reveal that CP/GAG complexes form unique helixes depending on the nature of backbone and the type of GAG. The structure-property relationships can be useful for fabrication of highly ordered macromolecular materials for broad electronic or biological applications.

K.PV.5
17:40
Authors : Geoffrey Cotin 1, Cristina Blanco Andujar 1, Catalina Bordeianu 1, Damien Mertz 1, Florent Meyer 2, D. Felder-Flesch 1 and Sylvie. Begin-Colin 1
Affiliations : 1 Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux, UMR 7504, CNRS- University of Strasbourg, 23 Rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg, France 2 INSERM, UMR 1121, 11 rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg, France

Resume : In the field of the synthesis and functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications, most researches aim at developing multifunctional theranostic NPs which can both identify disease states and deliver therapy and allow thus following the effect of therapy by imaging. The current challenge for iron oxide based NPs is the design of NPs able to combine in one nano-objects both magnetic hyperthermia (MH) and MRI with the best efficiency in order to reduce the dose injected in the patient. Ultra small iron oxide NPs are already commercially used as T2 contrast agent for MRI. The use of MH as a stand-alone or an adjacent therapy for cancer is closer to be a reality in every hospital thanks to the positive results achieved by the clinical trials carried out by MagforceTM(Germany) treating glioblastoma. Nonetheless, the need for direct intratumoral injection of large amounts of NPs to achieve a therapeutic effect only points out at the need of improving the available nanomaterials for MH. Different parameters may be varied to increase the effective heat loss of a ferrofluid such as size, shape anisotropy or composition, among others. Shape and aspect ratio may offer interesting possibilities as chain formation has been previously reported to increase heat loss. Furthermore there is also a need for evaluating the heating efficiency in cellular media as it may be different from that in solution. On that basis, plate-like, cubic and octopod shape NPs were prepared by thermal decomposition of home-made iron stearate, functionalised with dendron ligands to achieve aqueous suspensions and proved suitable for in vivo injection. MH performance was found to be shape-dependent with octopod-shaped NPs exhibiting the highest SAR values of 260 W.g-1 (f = 579 kHz, 8 kAm-1, ILP = 7.1 nHm2kg-1) or 960 W.g-1 (f = 796 kHz, 16 kAm-1, ILP = 4.8 nHm2kg-1). At the same time, their performance in MRI was investigated leading to relaxivity values of 16.9 and 405.5 mM-1 s-1 for r1 and r2, respectively, which was superior to that of commercial products like Resovist®. Finally, cell response was studied as a function of NP concentration and morphology, as well as under MH treatment. Therapeutic properties were also obtained by filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with ferrite NPs as heat mediator for photothermal ablation and as contrast agent for MRI respectively. They were capable of absorbing and efficiently converting NIR light into heat to generate thermoablative temperatures and cell lysis. They can be used as T2 agents for MR image-guided photothermal therapy. The obtained results open the possibility of using these systems as theranostic platform thanks to the exhibited performance in hyperthermia and MRI at the cell level.

K.PV.6
17:40
Authors : I. Bogdanoviciene 1, I. Grigoraviciute-Puroniene 1, K. Tsuru 2, E. Garskaite 1, Z. Stankeviciute 1, A. Beganskiene 1, K. Ishikawa 2, A. Kareiva 1
Affiliations : 1 Institute of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius LT-03225, Lithuania; 2 Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 Japan

Resume : Calcium phosphate (CaP)-based ceramics have a chemical composition very close to the mineral part of the bone. Biphasic, triphasic and multiphasic calcium orthophosphates have been considered as biomaterials for reconstruction of bone defects, dental and orthopedic applications. In general, this concept is determined by advantageous balances of more stable, frequently hydroxyapatite and more resorbable, typically tricalcium phosphates (Ca3(PO4)2, TCP), including α- and β-TCP phases of calcium orthophosphate composites, while the optimum ratios depend on the particular application. In most cases, the β-TCP is implanted into a bone structure in the form of granules or blocks (dense or macroporous scaffolds). In the past decades, β-TCP powders are reportedly prepared via conventional solid-state reactions, combustion or flame spray synthesis, chemical precipitation technique and sol–gel method. Namely, the precipitation technique, besides its low cost, has been widely used due to the better control of composition and physical properties of obtained powders. In the present work, for the synthesis of tricalcium phosphate powders a novel wet polymeric precipitation method in an aqueous PVA solution has been developed. The formation of β-TCP ceramics synthesized by polymeric precipitation method requires 800 °C temperature, as determined by TG-DSC analysis. The XRD analysis results, before and after calcination, confirmed that single phase β-TCP powders were obtained at rather low temperature (800 °C). Moreover, the formation of β-TCP occurred via transformation of the nanocrystalline Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) phase into β-TCP. The SEM micrographs of β-TCP samples synthesized by polymeric precipitation method showed that spherically shaped particles 100–300 nm in size have formed after heat treatment at 800 °C. Besides, the synthesized β-TCP powders showed a narrow and homogeneous particle size distribution. From these β-TCP powders the bars of 6.46 x 4.35 mm size were pressed for further animal in vivo histological investigations. Fabricated β-TCP specimens were placed to the holes drilled in the bones of the rats and maintained for 4 weeks. These specimens are currently under investigation. This work was supported by a grant KALFOS (No. LJB-2/2015) from the Research Council of Lithuania.

K.PV.7
17:40
Authors : Eri Yoshida1, Takeshi Nagayasu1, Fernando Jorge Monteiro2,3,4, Kai Kamada5
Affiliations : 1Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Japan; 2i3S - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Portugal; 3INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica, Divisão de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Portugal; 4Faculdade de Engenharia, DEMM, Universidade do Porto, Portugal; 5Graduate School of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Japan

Resume : Infections induced by bacterial biofilm formation on medical devices such as implants or catheters are recognized as a significant problem. Development of specific materials which inhibit microorganisms’ attachment and/or retard biofilm formation by reducing bacterial proliferation is required to solve this problem. In this study, we propose an antibacterial coating material based on biocompatible titanium, that is, titanate nanosheets (TNS). TNS was synthesized by a simple hydrolysis reaction using titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide and tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The particle size of the resulting TNS, measured by the dynamic light scattering method, was under 10 nm. It dispersed in a solution stably, and the colloidal solution of TNS was transparent. The antibacterial effect of the colloidal solution was evaluated by a colony forming units counting method. The result showed that higher concentrations of TNS solution exhibited greater antibacterial effect. Though the TNS absorbs tetramethylammonium cations (TMA+) because of the negative charge, this TMA+ did not exhibit any antibacterial effect at all. This result implies that the TNS material itself has an antibacterial effect and the mechanism is assumed to physically damage the bacteria. Moreover, TNS exhibited an inhibition effect on bacterial agglutination. This will be also useful to help prevent biofilm formation on medical devices.

K.PV.8
17:40
Authors : Tuğçe Bekat, Mualla Öner
Affiliations : Department of Chemical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34210 Istanbul, Turkey

Resume : PHBV (3-polyhydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) is a bio-based and biodegradable polymer derived from bacterial fermentation. It possesses comparable properties to conventional plastics; however, its relatively low thermal stability and brittleness limits its industrial usage. Incorporation of nano-sized inorganic particles into PHBV matrix is a novel method for overcoming the limitations of thermal and mechanical properties [1-3]. ZnO (zinc oxide) particles are a popular additive for polymer matrices due to bio-compatibility, high elastic modulus, and high thermal and chemical stability. Nevertheless, particles are known to form agglomerates during wet synthesis and during incorporation into organic polymer matrices. Agglomeration is an important phenomenon that should be prevented, since it hinders improvement of polymer nanocomposites properties. Surface modification is one method to increase the compatibility between the organic polymer and inorganic particle interface and thus reduce particle agglomeration. Ultrasonic cavitation is another method effective in dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles within suspensions. In this study, rod-shaped ZnO particles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method [4]. Ultrasonic dispersion was applied to the particles in combination with surface modification prior to incorporation into PHBV matrix by melt-extrusion. Mechanical properties of the biocomposites were analyzed and compared to those of neat PHBV. [1] Srithep, Y.; Ellingham, T.; Peng, J.; Sabo, R.; et al. Polym. Degrad. Stab. 2013, 98 (8), 1439. [2] Silverman, T.; Naffakh, M.; Marco, C.; Ellis, G. Mater. Chem. Phys. 2016, 170, 145. [3] Bekat, T.; Öner, M. Pure Appl. Chem. 2016, 88 (10–11), 1027. [4] Akin, B.; Oner, M. Res. Chem. Intermed. 2012, 38 (7), 1511.

K.PV.9
17:40
Authors : Ippei Inoue (1), Yasuaki Ishikawa (2), Yukiharu Uraoka (2), Ichiro Yamashita (2), Hisashi Yasueda (1)
Affiliations : (1) Frontier Research Labs., Institute for Innovation, Ajinomoto Co., Inc.; (2) Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology

Resume : Peptide aptamers with affinity for inorganic target materials have been selected from phage-display screening and have been widely used in construction of bio-inorganic interfaces. However a critical point in the bio-panning was an elution step of objective phages from phage-target complexes, because it was difficult to recover the intact phage bodies with high affinity peptide-aptamers from the complexes. For the purpose of harvest of peptide aptamers with high affinity for inorganic-material nanoparticles (NPs), we transferred phage-DNA into bacterial cells using an electroporation with intact phage-NPs complexes directly bypassing the elution process. We have successfully obtained a novel peptide aptamer (named ST-1 with the sequence AYPQKFNNNFMS) with highly strong binding activity for TiO2 by the easy and rapid screening method. A cage-shaped protein fused with both ST-1 and an available carbon nanotube-affinity peptide could efficiently mineralize a titanium-compound around the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The titanium-compound-CNT complex incorporated in the photo-electrode of a Dye-sensitized solar cell boosted the solar cell performance. This peptide aptamer selection method makes it possible to isolate phages bound with target materials most strongly, and also the procedure is simple and rapid for selection of aptamers in the process of phage-display screening.

K.PV.10
17:40
Authors : Meryem Hatip, Mustafa O. Guler and Aykutlu DÂNÂ
Affiliations : Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Ankara, TURKEY, 06800

Resume : Self-assembly is a process in which a disordered pre-existing constituent autonomously forms an organized structure or pattern without any human intervention. This natural process, received growing interest as a bottom-up nano fabrication tool for designing biocompatible, biodegradable, inert and bio-functional peptide based bioinspired nanomaterials. Recent advances showed us that the self-assembled peptide nanostructures provide an appropriate platform for regenerative medicine, tissue regeneration and stem cell differentiation due to self-supporting and extracellular matrix mimicking properties. Thanks to the dynamic nature of self-assembled peptide nanostructures, morphological and supramolecular chirality of self-assembled peptide nanostructures affect the biological responses. Here, we study various self-assembly conditions and self-assembly mechanism of peptide amphiphiles synthesized with different molecular and supramolecular chirality. Switch in the trigger forces such as pH change or charged molecules in the system, and amino acid sequence modifications in the secondary structure-forming region of peptide amphiphiles lead to self-assembled nanostructures with different morphologies. We showed that, type of amino acid residues and trigger forces effects to bonding ability and morphologies as a result. These supramolecular chiral peptide nanostructures were studied in detail by several spectroscopic techniques and in situ and ex situ imaging methods.

K.PV.11
17:40
Authors : Mohsen Mohammadi, sabrieh Assadi Shahi saraee, Atiyeh Tavajjohi, Reza Poursalehi, Samad Mohammadnezgad, Hamid Delavari H, Azin Ziashahabi
Affiliations : Nanostructures Lab, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran, Iran; Department of Medical Mycology, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-331, Tehran, Iran; Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University of Shahr Rey; Tehran, Iran; Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran, Iran; Biomolecular Image Analysis Group, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran, Iran, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran, Iran.

Resume : The Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized in a green way using by Zingiber officinale extract as a reduction agent. Zingiber officinale extract were poured into 0.2mM AgNO3 and after half an hour AgNPs formation were started. The change of color from colorless to light yellow, brown and reddish brown, respectively, is the first indication of Ag NPs formation. Next step, ultraviolet-visible (UV) spectroscopy was used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the Ag NPs size between 5 to 25 nm. Antifungal activity of synthesized Ag NPs was studied by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Candida albicans fungi and compared with Fluconazole antifungal drug. The MIC outcome revealed that Ag NPs synthesized by Zingiber officinale are more powerful than Fluconazole drug against Candida albicans. In conclusion, the aforementioned Ag NPs could be an appropriate alternative candidate for Fluconazole.

K.PV.12
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VI. Nanomaterials , Nanodevices & Bioimaging for Nanomedicine Collaborative Session. Keynote Presenters from Taiwan, Japan & Switzerland. : Organizer/Chair: Dr. Peilin Chen (Academia Sinica, Taiwan)
08:30
Authors : Peilin Chen
Affiliations : Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sincia, Taiwan

Resume : In this lecture, I will discuss some recent developments in the advanced optical imaging systems and biomedical devices in our group. I will first present the development of various nanoparticles for sensing the pH value in cellular environment. By surface functionalization schemes, it is possible to control the location of nanoparticles in cells allowing us to track the local pH value around the nanoparticles inside cancer cells. The acidification process of nanoparticles in the endocytosis process can be recorded. Such technique can be extended to detect the local chemical reaction inside living cells. As for in vivo imaging, we have utilized the multi-photon microscopy to investigate the disease models with the help of nanoparticles. I will discuss the applications of multi-photon imaging in various mouse models. On our multi-photon platform, it is possible to track the movement of various types of cells including platelets, white blood cells, red blood cells, tumor stem cells and nanomaterials in mouse models using surface modified nanoparticles at a frame rate as high as 100 frame/s. I will also summarize our recent development of the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolation chips. CTCs are cancer cells that break away from a primary tumor or metastatic site, escape from immunosurveillance, and then circulate in the peripheral blood with the capability of forming distant metastases. "Liquid biopsy for CTC detection" provides no radiotherapy side effect and can be carried out routinely in patients at all disease sites. Although the tumor liquid biopsy can be easily used for collecting CTCs, the identification of CTCs in patient blood samples is technically challenging because of the extremely low concentration of CTCs among a large number of hematologic cells (red blood cells and leukocytes). To address this unmet need for rare cell isolation, we have developed substrates using the synergistic effect of nanomaterials and biological immobilization of CTC markers for enhancing CTC capture efficiency during a liquid biopsy procedure. In addition to the pursuit of high-cell-capture yield and specificity from human blood on chips, further vertical integration for the downstream characterization of CTCs is required for future CTC chips, such as liquid biopsy, for achieving a variety of clinical applications. In our approach, we have employed three-dimensional (3D) conducting polymer-based bioelectronic interfaces (BEIs) that can be integrated on electronic devices for rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) isolation, detection, and collection via an electrically triggered cell released from chips.

K.VI.1
08:45
Authors : Chi-Feng Huang*, Ting-Kuo Lee*, Peilin Chen**, Yu-Fang Hu***, Keng S. Liang* and Y. Hwu*
Affiliations : * Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan ** Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan *** TTY Biopharm Co., Ltd, Taipei 115, Taiwan

Resume : The inaugurations of the new generation synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities mark an important milestone on the development of X-ray science. The impact of these new facility to the nanoscience and nanotechnology is also become visible. The speaker will use two examples, to suggest the bright potential of X-rays imaging, which is an area taking full advantage of the offer of these new opportunity. One the application synchrotron X-rays, phase contrast imaging and transmission X-ray microscopy demonstrate the capability to impact life science by tackle important questions, such as the tumor related micro-angiogenesis. With the capability to characterize quantitative all the structural factor of the microvasculature of complete tumor region or an organ, aided with the innovative use of nanoparticles, we could conclude that the phenotype dependent tumor angiogenesis in mouse glioma models. We also used the SACLA (RIKEN/HARIMA, Japan) X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) to implement coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of individual liposome particles in water, with or without inserted doxorubicin nanorods. In spite of the low cross section, the diffracted intensity of blank (drug-free) liposomes was sufficient for spatial reconstruction yielding quantitative structural information. When the particles contained doxorubicin, we could measure the structural parameters of the nanorods. In both cases, the information went well beyond what can be obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electron microscopy. This is important for the potential drug efficiency optimization and, in general, for X-FEL analysis of individual low-cross-section nanoparticles.

K.VI.2
09:15
Authors : Dar-Bin Shieh, Wei-Ting Lee, Tsung-Ju Li, Li-Xing Yang, Shang-Rung Wu, Chen-Sheng Yeh, Pei-Jane Tsai
Affiliations : National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan

Resume : Nanomaterials have been widely applied to advance clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. A novel approach for synchronizing hyperthermia and thermal-responsive local drug release was realized through targeting probe combined a magnetite nanocrystal (Fe3O4@PSMA) core and a polynucleotide shell carrying 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER2) antibody for cancer-cell-specific targeting. The probes play not only as a MRI molecular imaging contract agent for confirming disease location, but also serve as an important relay for externally delivered radiofrequency energy for tumor hyperthermia and drug release. Pathological examines and in vitro study show that this synchronization is significantly more efficacious in both in vitro and in vivo models than hyperthermia or chemotherapy alone. Prominent tumor remission in vivo was achieved through radiofrequency synchronization of hyperthermia and chemotherapy after the nanoparticle had been intravenously injected. For the infectious disease management, we showed its efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). CDI has emerged to be a major cause of healthcare-associated infection in the world. Resistance of CD spores to various preventive and therapeutic measures post a significant threat in CDI. Nanomaterials have been explored for potential applications in anti-microbials with intrinsic advantages of low drug-resistance issue and high efficacy. We discovered a specific truncated octahedral Fe3O4 single crystal nanoparticles with a strong inhibitory effect to CD spore germination in vitro and in vivo. The 22 nm presented excellent saturation magnetization (94 emu/g) close to the bulk due to the presence of alpha iron in the crystal. Such particle showed a dose dependent inhibition of CD spores germination (62% growth inhibition at 50 µg/mL) for 20 minutes of exposure. At 500 µg/mL, the inhibition reached a degree close to that of sodium hypochloride. CDI animal model established in NF-?B-reporter mice using oral gavage with CD presented significant inflammation in control mice compared to the nanoparticle treated group as revealed by in vivo Imaging System. Cryo-electron tomography clearly showed binding of the nanoparticles to CD surface followed by disruption of CD spores. Pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1?, TNF-?, and INF-? were significantly suppressed upon nanoparticle treatment. These results provide nano-structural based strategy of CDI control and potential mechanisms thus encourage further clinical translational development.

K.VI.3
09:45
Authors : Che-Ming Jack Hu
Affiliations : Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Resume : Cell membranes present a unique interface that governs numerous biological events in physiology as well as in disease pathogenesis; exploiting this interface for nanoparticle functionalization promises enhanced biocompatibility and novel treatment modalities with biomimetic functionalities. Precise control over nanoparticle surface charge modulates the nanoparticle?s surface energy and influences its interaction dynamics with biological components. Using polymeric nanoparticles consisting of carboxylated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids), a biodegradable polymer commonly used for drug delivery, we demonstrate surface density of the carboxyl groups strongly influences nanoparticle interaction with cellular membranes. In particular, we observed that below a surface density of 0.65 carboxyl groups per nm2, cellular membranes cloak over the polymeric nanoparticles under dispersion. The cloaking process is efficient and self-limiting, resulting in complete, unilamellar membrane coverage. Close inspection of the cell membrane cloaked nanoparticles shows that the membranes are oriented right-side-out, which can be attributed to the asymmetric nature of cellular membranes. Cell membranes formulated with positively charged particles also yields interesting insight as they result in particle-adsorbed membrane vesicles rather than membrane cloaked particles. These observations suggest a subtle attractive interaction behind the cell membrane cloaked nanoparticles. Analysis has been performed to validate that the cell membrane cloak effectively functionalizes nanoparticles with membrane membrane proteins and surface glycans, bestowing the nanoparticles a biomimetic surface for biological interactions. The technique has been applied to cellular membranes derived from red blood cells, platelets, and cancer cells, and the resulting nanoparticles have been shown to adopt numerous cell-like functionalities, including cell-like interactions with the immune system, toxins, pathogens, and endothelium. Several therapeutic applications, such as long-circulating drug delivery, targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, vaccine preparation, and pathogen isolation were demonstrated. The biomimetic nanoparticles have therapeutic potentials in treating cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease, and infection. They may also be engineered as an advanced diagnostic tool.

K.VI.4
10:05
Authors : Yu-Sheng Hsiao1, Peilin Chen2
Affiliations : 1Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, 2Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica

Resume : Here we have demonstrated the operation of conducting polymer-based bioelectronic interfaces (BEIs) as two functional swimming pools on organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), which can be used for rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) isolation and detection. It is noteworthy that one kind of novel three-dimensional OECT (3D-OECT) devices was developed for the CTC enrichment via an electrically triggered cell released from one chip, and another planar type OECTs was used for identifying cell density of four different cancer cell lines. To develop the 3D-OECT based swimming pool system, we used the chemical oxidative polymerization of carboxylic acid?modified 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene and modified poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) transfer printing technology. The high-aspect-ratio structures of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based "nanorod" arrays can be obtained on the OECT active channel layer when using the Si "microrod" arrays as masters. Then, we integrated the biotinylated poly-(L)-lysine-graft-poly-ethylene-glycol (PLL-g-PEG-biotin) coating with 3D PEDOT-based BEIs for dynamic control of the capture/release performance of CTCs on chips; this combination exhibited high cell-capture efficiency from EpCAM-positive MCF7 cells while maintaining high resistance from the EpCAM-negative Hela cells adhesion after 1 h of incubation. Due to the outstanding electrochemical doping/dedoping and low-impedance properties of PEDOT materials, the captured CTCs can be triggered to electrically release through the desorption phenomena of PLL-g-PEG-biotin. More than 90% of the captured cells can be released while maintaining very high cell viability. We also demonstrated that, the planar-type OECT based swimming pool system for the cell-sensing, we prepared the high electrical conductivity of PEDOT-based active channel layers on planar type OECTs for monitoring CTC-capture performance on chips and identifying the cancer cell phenotypes. Evidence suggesting that this study opens an avenue of bioelectronic medicine for rapid cancer diagnostics.

K.VI.5
10:20 Coffee break    
10:30
Authors : Koichi Kato
Affiliations : Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Biomedical & Health Sciences, Hiroshima University

Resume : Organic materials incorporating functional polypeptides that exhibit biological activities similar to growth factors and extracellular matrices can be regarded as bioinspired, bioactive materials, because such materials can induce biological signals in living cells through specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Such a bioinspired strategy provides a variety of biomaterials capable of biological regulation of cell behaviours, such as cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and function. This paper presents our attempts to demonstrate the feasibility of genetic engineering to design and construct such polypeptide-incorporating materials. In the first attempt, a cell adhesive polypeptide, derived from extracellular matrix laminin, was genetically engineered to link a collagen-binding peptide. The chimeric polypeptide was expressed in E. coli and simply but firmly incorporated into collagen hydrogels. The composite hydrogel was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its feasibility to provide an appropriate microenvironment for neural progenitor cells. The results showed that the hydrogel systems served to improve the survival of the cells transplanted into the brain by blocking the infiltration of inflammatory microglia and providing an adhesive substrate to the transplanted cells. A similar strategy could be applied for incorporating epidermal growth factor (EGF) into collagen hydrogel by fusing a collagen-binding polypeptide at the terminus of an EGF domain. In the collagen hydrogel networks incorporating EGF, we observed that proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells were significantly enhanced. The examples described above demonstrate that matrix-binding functional polypeptides can be synthesized by fusing an adaptor peptide at the terminus. This strategy is quite robust and opens a variety of applications especially in the design of biologically active materials that provides optimized microenvironments for living cells.

K.VI.6
10:50
Authors : Shigeori Takenaka
Affiliations : Department of Applied Chemistry?Center for Bio-microsensing Technology, Kyushu Institute of Technology

Resume : Naphthalene diimide, ND, derivatives form a stable complex with a DNA duplex, where two of their substituents are located in either grooves of DNA duplex and act as an anchor to prevent the complex from dissociation. Since ND barely stabilizes single stranded DNA, this phenomenon is specific to double stranded DNA. We synthesized FND, ND carrying two ferrocene moieties to enable electrochemical gene detection. Target genes were detected specifically through the electrochemical signal of FND concentrated on the hybrid with a single stranded DNA probe-immobilized electrode.1 Recently, we found that FND derivatives serve as a strong tetraplex DNA binder and applied them to electrochemical detection of telomerase activity. This is based on the detection of a tetraplex DNA generated by telomerase. Since telomerase activity is high only in cancer cells, this method may be applicable to cancer diagnosis. We developed further oral cancer diagnosis for exfoliated oral cells in collaboration with dentists.2-4 The cyclic ND linkage connecting the substituent termini is expected to improve selectivity for tetraplex DNA binding because of its diminished affinity for DNA duplexes. In fact, cyclic ND showed higher affinity for ta-core DNA carrying part of a telomere DNA sequence5 Cyclic ND carrying a ferrocene part in the linker chain also showed high affinity for TA-core DNA. These observations should help realize electrochemical cancer diagnosis based on FND. To improve binding affinity for tteraplex DNA, cyclic perylene diimide, cPDI, was synthesized by connected with two linker chain from amide nitrogen atoms. cPDI strongly bound to TA-core carrying the part of human telomere DNA sequence and expecting to form hybrid type tetraplex structure. cPDI has a 103-times preference for tetraplex structure than for double stranded one. According to telomerase inhibition assay, cPDI has 0.3 ?M of IC50 value and furthermore cPDI bound to tetraplex DNA generated with telomerase and stabilized to inhibit the telomere reaction. These results showed the possibility of cPDI as an effective anticancer drug. This work was carried out as collaborative research between Kyushu Dental University and Kyushu Institute of Technology. I appreciate the significant contribution made by researchers who appears in the following papers. References 1. S. Takenaka et al., Anal. Chem., 72, 1334-1341, (2000). 2. K. Mori et al., Clin. Chem., 59, 289-295 (2013). 3. S. Takenaka and S. Sato, "Telomerase as a biomarker for oral cancer," Biomarkers in Cancer, Victor R. Preedy, Patel & B. Vinood, Eds., Springer pp. 753-770 (2015). 4. S. Sato and S. Takenaka J. Inorg. Biochem., 167, 21-26 (2017) 5. Y. Esaki et al., Chem Comm., 50, 5967-5969 (2014).

K.VI.7
11:10
Authors : Hideaki Yamamoto1, Sho Kono2, Syoi Fujishiro2, Kohei Furusawa2, Takashi Tanii2, Michio Niwano3, Ayumi Hirano-Iwata4,3
Affiliations : 1: Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Japan. 2: Graduate School of Fundamental Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan. 3: Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Japan. 4: Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Japan.

Resume : Titanium dioxide (TiO2) decomposes organic contaminants adsorbed on its surface via its photocatalytic activity, triggered by UV irradiation. This phenomenon has been applied commercially in self-cleaning glass windows and coatings. In pursuit of developing a novel technique for engineering biointerfaces, we recently began to explore an application of TiO2 photocatalysis to locally alter the affinity of scaffold surfaces to living cells. Here, we describe how this method can be employed to pattern neuronal cells and networks. A thin layer of TiO2 was sputtered onto a glass coverslip, and the TiO2 surface was modified with n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) to make it cell-repellent.?By irradiating the OTS region with UV light and inducing subsequent adsorption of scaffolding molecules, PC12 cells and primary rat hippocampal neurons could be patterned both ex situ and in situ. Passive adsorption of extracellular matrix proteins was sufficient for supporting the growth of PC12 cells but not primary neurons. To create an adhesive domain for primary neurons, the proteins had to be actively cross-linked to the selected region. This was achieved by coupling laminin to the RPL2 protein, which has strong affinity toward metal oxides, including TiO2. With further improvements, the TiO2-assisted photocatalytic lithography would provide a key technology for fabricating living neuronal circuits with defined network topology and studying structure-function relationships in neuronal networks.

K.VI.8
11:30
Authors : Si-Han Wu
Affiliations : Graduate Institute of Nanomedicine and Medical Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan

Resume : A recent survey reported by Chan and co-workers suggests that the delivery efficiencies for cancer nanomedicines are low-only 0.7% of an injected dose of nanoparticles ends up in a tumor- and not improving in the past ten years. To accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine and make nanotherapeutics for cancer a reality, factors that could significantly affect the in vitro and in vivo behaviors of nanoparticles should be adequately considered and investigated. Enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) is a key feature of tumor blood vessels and has been extensively used in the nanomedicine, such as Doxil (PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin) for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. In general, EPR-mediated passive targeting highly relies on the prolonged circulation time of nanocarriers. Particularly important two parameters, that is, (1) nanocarrier size and (2) surface property are expected to play a key role on the pharmacokinetics and the biodistribution of the carrier material. In general, the injected materials would be recognized and bound rapidly by serum opsonins, followed by phagocytosis by macrophages and substantially accumulated in both the liver and the spleen (also known as the reticuloendothelial system). Previously, comprehensive studies highlighted protein corona neutrality as an important design in the development of targeted nanomaterial delivery and demonstrated that even a small difference in the surface heterogeneity could result in profoundly different interactions with cells and tissues. Therefore, the control and understanding of protein corona composition are critical for successful EPR-targeted nanomedicine. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) are intriguing nanocarriers for efficient and cell-specific delivery of proteins, enzymes, and anti-cancer drugs to improve treatment of diseases. However, despite often highly promising in vitro findings, such as enhanced uptake and intracellular processing as well as efficacy, few in vivo evaluation of MSN are dedicated to investigating how the protein corona formed on nanocarriers in complex biological media mediate the in vivo tumor accumulation of nanocarriers. Here we systematically examined the effect of size and the surface heterogeneity (i.e. spatial arrangement and relative exposure of surface amines) of MSN on their biological fate both in vitro and in vivo. Four types of MSN with zeta potentials of around +35 mV and various diameters (50 and 200 nm) were chosen. First, we prepared well-suspended MSN by PEGylation (MSN@PEG) and simultaneously decorated them with positively charged ligands polyethyleneimine (PEI) or quaternary ammonium salts (TMAC). Then, interactions between these nanoparticles and Raw 264.7 macrophages as well as HeLa cells were studied in serum-containing media. Also, the impacts of these nanoparticles on cell cycle, autophagy, oxidative stress and hemolytic activity were investigated. Most importantly, by using the in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging system, dramatic effects of the surface heterogeneity on blood circulation time were observed following intravenous injection of MSNs. Extremely noteworthy is 50 nm of MSN@PEG/TMAC showed highly tumor-targeting efficiency under IVIS investigation. This study would help us to clarify the relationship between synthetic identity, biological identity, and physiological response, and most importantly, develop a clinically translatable silica nano-platform for delivering theranostics.

K.VI.9
11:45
Authors : Jau-Ye Shiu
Affiliations : Laboratory of Applied Mechanobiology, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland

Resume : Nanostructed substrates has been designed to simulate complex extracellular environments and monitor dynamic biological process at single cell level. When nanotopographic structures are being used to elucidate how physical cues influence cell behavior, the problems of detecting or sensing how cell feedback on nanotopographic structures are required to fully understanding cell-substrate interaction. A robust nanopillar platform with greatly increased spatial resolution now reveals that the forces deflecting beta1-integrin-rich perinuclear nanopillars are significantly higher than at the cell periphery. These forces originate from stress fibers spanning the nucleus as confirmed using pharmaceutical inhibitors, expression of KASH dominant-negative mutants and LMNA knockout. As the nanopillar pitch size is smaller than typical adhesions, single perinuclear stress fibers bind and pull multiple nanopillars into transient clusters. During cell migration, actin cap associated perinuclear stress fibers translocate gradually without losing tensile strength, suggesting that actin filaments are breaking away at the rear of each ?-actinin crosslinked stress fiber, while new ones join, which requires opening and closing of ??-actinin zippers?. Perinuclear adhesions might thus play far more important roles in rigidity sensing and mechano-chemical signal conversion than previously thought.

K.VI.10
12:00
Authors : Yi-Ping Chen
Affiliations : Graduate Institute of Nanomedicine and Medical Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan

Resume : In our previous study, we developed mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) as an enzyme delivery approach to successfully deliver superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) into cells. Results demonstrated that these denatured antioxidant enzymes conjugated on the MSN surface could be delivered and refolded with specific enzyme activity to protect cells attacked by ROS. The approach not only overcomes the challenges of protein delivery, including poor stability, membrane impermeability and endosome trapping/digestion, but provides the following advantages: (1) one-step protein conjugation and purification, (2) easy mass production and (3) multiple enzyme delivery to regulate cascade reactions. While this approach shows potential development of preclinical protein therapy, an ideal nanocarrier applied in vivo needs to be more biocompatible, have increased stability, and avoid accumulation in organs after administration. This study therefore aims to improve the delivery approach to achieve the above properties by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). First, biocompatible PEGylated MSN conjugated SOD were prepared and characterized. Then, we focused on the mechanism study in detail by comparing the difference between native SOD and denatured SOD conjugated MSN after cell delivery. To mimic the real environment in vivo, in vitro cell related studies were also carried out in serum-containing media condition. Protein structure was revealed by circular dichroism. We found that denatured SOD has better enzyme activity than native SOD when conjugated to MSN. We propose denatured SOD has less steric hindrance on MSN, which promotes efficient delivery resulting in enhanced enzyme activity.

K.VI.11
12:15
Authors : Chiung-Wen Kuo, Di-Yen Chueh , and Peilin Chen
Affiliations : Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Resume : We will report our recent progress in the development of advanced imaging systems. We will discuss how to use various surface modified nanoparticles for bioimaging including quantum dots and mesoporous nanoparticles. By various surface functionalization schemes, it is possible to control the location of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo allowing the measurement of chemical environments inside cells and tumors. To observe the behavior of nanoparticles in animal model, we have employed two-photon microscopy to study the real-time distribution of nanomaterials in the blood vessels. Since the penetration of infrared radiation is still limited to less than 1 mm from the surfaces of skins, we developed blood vessel observation technique on the earlobes of mice. When the drug loaded nanoparticles were injected in tail vein, the real time distribution of these nanoparticles in the blood vessels on the earlobes can be observed directly. To further evaluate the targeting effect of drug to tumor tissue. We have developed tumor model on the earlobes of mice by inoculating RFP-BXPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. The surfaces of nanoparticles were modified by antibody. After 10 minutes of injection at tail vein, the accumulation of nanoparticles can be clearly seen at tumor site. The increase in the nanoparticles can be observed by time-lapse images. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that break away from a primary tumor or metastatic site, escape from immunosurveillance, and then circulate in the peripheral blood with the capability of forming distant metastases. Two photon microscopy was used to study the tumors and their microenvironment. When CTCs are in circulation, the imaging system allows us to track the movement of individual CTCs in the blood vessels around tumors.

K.VI.12
12:30 Lunch    

Symposium organizers
Bo ZHUCollege of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University

99 Shangda, Baoshan, Shanghai, 200444

bozhu@shu.edu.cn
Eugenia BUZANEVATSN University of Kyiv, NASU

The Scientific and Training Centre “Physical and Chemical Material Science”, Volodymyrska Str. 64/13, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine

emrs@univ.kiev.ua
Peter SCHARFFTechnical University of llmenau

Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Weimarer Strasse 25, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany

peter.scharff@tu-ilmenau.de