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2014 Fall Meeting

NANO BIOMATERIALS

U

Bioinspired and Biointegrated Materials as Frontiers Nanomaterials IV

This symposium, as FOURTH Symposium (IV) on "Bioinspired and Biointegrated Materials as New Frontiers Nanomaterials" , is aimed to give overview of bioinspired and biointegrated materials multifunctional applications in biomedical healthcare field specially using biological and mimetic molecules , materials for design biointegrated and bioinspired ones and their multifunctional systems for biomedical applications. This is a newest nanomaterials, nanosystems field which is expected to rapidly grow further towards the next generation of biomaterials that are developed and designed using nanoscience and biomimetic bases, including mimetic skin, bone tissue and remodeling as well as biomedical applications, their functionality and adaptation to Bionic Human systems, Medical BioNanoRobots, in vivo systems for healthcare.

Scope

This symposium will cover the frontiers on the modeling, engineering, researching and multifunctional (nanomedicine, biosensors, photonics, electronics for BioNanoRobotics in vivo, and bioinformatics) applications of the Bioinspired and Biointegrated Nanomaterials and Nanosystems.

Starting from well-known biological structures, such as the complex structures with high toughness (biominerals like diatom and sponge silica, seashells and bone) and the structures with hierarchical organization and high mechanical strength (as organic fibers like spider silk), scientists and engineers develop the principles for design of novel nanomaterials with superior properties, using biomimetic and bioguided synthesis nanotechnologies. The design, engineering of these materials are aimed at obtaining of the properties which respond to external, biologically compatible stimuli (physical, chemical, biological) and to active electronic, photonic, magnetic nanosystems. The symposium will include completed sessions ranging from computational modeling, engineering of multifunctional biointerfaces and biotemplating, nanoscience to applications. A specific focus will be given to biomedical applications of biointerfaces in cell and tissue engineering, sensing and diagnosis.

The symposium will bring together researchers from bio - science and - nanotechnology for biomaterials, biological and biomimetic, nanomaterials sciences,technologies for nanomedicine and engineering bio - electronic, - photonic, - magnetic, -informatics nanosystems to discuss the latest advancement in the understanding of properties, and biosynthetic mechanism of biomaterials, as well as the use of biomaterials or their synthetic analogs for the synthesis of nanomaterials with controlled structures and functionalities.

A special young researcher Session for young scientist and graduate students' talks is planned at the symposium's first day on 5-7 p.m. Abstracts will be selected by the Scientific Committee and Invited Young Researchers as Chiefs for this special session on a competitive basis with the E-MRS's control number which the potential participant will obtain for submitted abstract.

Hot topics to be covered by the symposium

  • biodesign and nanotechnology sciences: from biological materials to bio - inspired and - mimetic materials synthesis;
  • bioinspired routes for synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles,systems, films;
  • functional biointerfaces : nanoscience and nanotechnologies;
  • biological nanosystems and their biomimetic analogs modeling;
  • bio-hybrid nanostructures - bioimmobilized and biointegrated nanoparticles, nanocarbon molecules into biohybrids for biomedical applications;
  • biological structures and biomimetic ones for regenerated biomedicine;
  • bioimaging, biosensing of biological nanosystems and their analogs;
  • electronic and photonic natural and mimetic materials science adaptation to Bionic Human systems science and BioNanoRobotics in vivo;
  • single-, multi- biomolecular motors, machines;
  • nano-, bio- photonics science,application to Bionic Eye systems 

Tentative list of invited speakers

  • Genevieva Pourroy (University of Strasbourg, Peptidomimetics to diagnosis method of breast cancer. Nano@Matrix EU Project)
  • Simon Robert Hall (University of Bristol, Biotemplating Models: chitosan matrix from crab shells usage to control the synthesis of conductors nanowires)
  • Praskovia Boltovets (ISP NAS of Ukraine, Surface Plasmon Resonance phenomena at biointerfaces to use for biosensing)
  • Sergiy Zankovych, (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Functionalized with biopolymer, bio-hybrid molecules titanium surface in medical implants)
  • Marie Brut (Université de Toulouse, Static Mode method for the treatment of biomolecular flexibility)
  • Thomas J. Webster (Brown University, Nanotechnologies for bone regeneration)
  • Matthias Epple (Universität Duisburg-Essen, Recrystallization of synthesized biominerals at biointeface in living cell: biomimetic chemistry)
  • Gerald Kada (Agilent Technologies, Development of the AFM Tip application in field of sensors for biomolecular processes)
  • Karsten Haupt (Compiègne University of Technology, Novel synthesis of synthetic programmed receptors for biosensors and biochips)
  • Jean-Bernard Fiche University of Montrepellier, (The molecular mechanism of DNA pumping machines modeling)
  • C.S. George Lee (Perdue University, USA.( From Robotics to BioNanoRobotics in vivo for healthcare).

Tentative list of scientific committee members

  • Giovanni Marletta (Italy)
  • Karsten Haupt, Genevieve Pourroy and Jean-Pierre Aime (France)
  • Kysil Olena (Ukraine)
  • Arianna Filoramo (France)
  • László Forró (Switzerland)
  • C.S. George Lee (USA)
  • Michael Köhler (Germany)
  • Andreas Schober (Germany)
  • Jean-Pierre Sauvage (France)
  • M. Jesus Ariza Camacho (Spain)
  • Tomas Keller and Michael Müller (Germany)
Start atSubject View AllNum.
 
Session I. Biological, Biomimetic, Bioinspired Biomedical Nanomaterials and Implantable Nano -devices,-systems: R&D. : In collaboration with the EU COST Action TD1003 Project on “Bioinspired Nanotechnologies: from Concepts to Applications : Organized and Chaired by Professor Jean-Pierre Aime (ECB-CBMN CNRS University, France), Dr.Emmanuel Stratakis (IESL FORTH and University of Crete, Greece) Dr.Ester Vazquez, ( Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain) and Dr. Victoria Biirkedal (Aarhus University, Denmark)
08:45
Authors : Professor Genevieve Pourroy, J. Jouhannaud, A. Garofalo, D. Felder-Flesch
Affiliations : Institut de Physique et Chimie des Mat?riaux de Strasbourg IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS-ECPM-Universit? de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2, France; genevieve.pourroy@ipcms.unistra.fr

Resume : The identification of sentinel lymph node (any node receiving lymph drainage from the tumor site and containing most likely malignancy if the tumor has metastasized) is significant in cancer prognosis. In most of the countries, radioactive colloid (RuS labelled with 99mTc) or Vital Blue dyes are injected around the primary tumor for a pre-operative detection. However, non-nuclear detection is also investigated since few years, and multimodal markers intended to be detected by magnetic and/or optical hand-held probes are now developed. In the framework of the ?Nanomatrix? INTERREG IV program Upper Rhine Valley A21, we have elaborated dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles as a potential alternative to radioactive colloids. Iron oxide nanoparticles of 10 nm in diameter have been produced in large quantities. In order to increase the grafting efficiency and to ensure the possibility of tuning the characteristics (morphology, functionalities, physico-chemical properties ?) of the organic coating, we combined dendritic molecules and phosphonic acid as coupling agent. Dendrons of first or second generation with (or not) a Patent Blue dye and/or a fluorescent dye at the periphery have been grafted on the nanoparticles. The structure and composition of the markers, the optical properties and the dynamic magnetic behavior in the 10 Hz-100 kHz frequency range have been characterized. Finally, the possibilities of detection by hand-held probes is discussed.

U.U I.1
09:15
Authors : Jean-Pierre Aimé
Affiliations : IECB-CBMN CNRS, University Bordeaux, FRANCE

Resume : DNA based nanostructures built on a long single stranded DNA scaffold offer the possibility to organize various molecules at the nanometer scale in one pot experiments. The folding of the scaffold is guaranteed by the presence of short, single stranded DNA sequences (staples) that hold together separate regions of the scaffold. We first consider simple structures made of three single-stranded oligonucleotides. Based on experimental (UV absorption) and numerical (replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations) data, we show that cooperativity is key to understand the thermodynamics of these constructions. In a second part, we derive a model of the annealing-melting properties of DNA origamis. The model captures important features such as the hysteresis between melting and annealing, as well as the dependence upon the topology of the scaffold. We also obtain temperature dependent average conformations that compare well to AFM images of quenched states of the partially folded origamis.

U.U I.2
11:45
Authors : Anthi Ranella1, Konstantina Terzaki1, Maria Sygletou1,2, Chara Simitzi1,3, Alexandros Selimis1, Costas Fotakis1,2
Affiliations : 1: Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (F.O.R.T.H.), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (I.E.S.L.), Heraklion, Crete, Greece. 2: University of Crete, Department of Physics, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. 3: University of Crete, Department of Biology, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

Resume : Over the recent years, a highly interdisciplinary field lying on the interface of different scientific fields has been developed concerning the design and the fabrication of bioinspired surfaces. Biomimetic scaffolds made of natural biopolymers are strong candidates for this trend by providing an excellent environment for tissue regeneration since their components are found in the extracellular matrix. Laser biopolymer processing offers the potential for scaffold fabrication relying on the unique characteristics of the laser light. In the present study, we report on the morphological features of the laser induced structures and their dependence on both the irradiation parameters and the substrate material. Chitosan, gelatin and type I collagen films were casted by the solvent evaporation method on different substrates (quartz, amorphous glass and silicon). The biopolymer films were irradiated by single pulses of a KrF laser (τ=30ns) and with multi-pulses of an IR laser emitting at 800nm (τ=20fs) resulted in different morphological modifications, indicating the effect of the laser wavelength and pulse duration on the induced structures. The bioactivity of the fabricated porous structures was confirmed by cell cultivation. Biopolymers casted on different substrates appear to obtain various porous structures. A variety of structures from surface foaming to nest-like cavitation can be achieved by adjusting the irradiation wavelength and the number of the applied pulses. Furthermore, the substrate material proves to be a crucial parameter for the laser induced topographies. Finally, the laser processed natural biopolymers were studied over cell outgrowth.

U.U.I.8
14:15
Authors : Mustafa O. Guler
Affiliations : Bilkent University Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology

Resume : Mimicking structure and function of the biological materials through programmed self-assembly of small molecules is important to study cell and extracellular matrix interactions. We study design and synthesis of peptide nanofiber scaffolds decorated with biologically important signals and effect of three dimensional nanofibrous systems on growth factor binding and its effect on cellular mechanisms for regenerative medicine applications. We design self-assembled supramolecular glyco systems for emulating glycosaminoglycan functions in the extracellular matrix. The high surface area of the nanofibrous system with various chemical groups can be also expoited to emulate enzyme active sites for developing biocatalysts in addition to extracellular matrix structural proteins’ properties.

U.WG1.7
 
Session WG2. Biomechanisms and molecular modeling. Chief: Dr. Alain Esteve, LAAS-CNRS, France. aesteve@laas.fr : Chair: Dr. Victoria Birkedal, inano center and centre for DNA technology, Aarhus University, Danmark
14:45
Authors : A. Estève (1,2), J.M. Ducéré (1,2), T. Calais (1,2), S. Rupich (4), A. Hemeryck (1,2), C. Rossi (1,2), M. Djafari Rouhani (1,3), Y.J. Chabal (4)
Affiliations : 1) CNRS; LAAS; 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France; 2) Univ. de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse, France; 3) Univ. de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse, France; 4) Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA;

Resume : Since the seminal work by N. Seeman and the subsequent discovery of DNA origami in the mid 2000’, DNA has emerged as a high-potential material for nanoassembly in future devices. It makes it possible both to provide complex and programmable molecular architectures and to selectively target, in principle, any kind of molecule, biological or not. The ability to chemically modify/functionalize DNA molecules opens the door for building new generations of multi-functional materials (including optical properties, chemical modifications for grafting purposes on metals or oxides …). In such cases, everything is performed during synthesis of the DNA strand, however many desirable devices will necessitate “on chip” integration, i.e. to develop DNA-based nano-architectures on solid surfaces. Consequently, the intrinsic coupling of DNA with solid surfaces of technological interest remains a fundamental issue. In this work, we address the mechanisms of DNA bonding with hydrogenated Si(111) surfaces (models for non-polar surfaces) as well as more polar surfaces such as silicon dioxide or alumina surfaces. A combined theoretical/experimental methodology is applied. Considering the adsorption of thymidine monophosphate (dTMP), DFT calculations, infrared spectroscopy and XPS experiments are used to unravel the chemical reactions occurring at surfaces This elementary chemical specie contains all basic elements constituting DNA strands, a sugar ring, a phosphate group and a nucleic acid enabli

U.WG2.1
 
Session: WG3. Technology integration. Chief: Dr. Maria Farsari : Chair: Professor. Irene Athanassakis, Univ. of Crete, Dept. of Biology
15:30
Authors : Alexandros Selimis, Elmina Kabouraki, Anna Mitraki, Maria Vamvakaki, and Maria Farsari
Affiliations : IESL-FORTH, Crete, Greece.

Resume : Direct Laser Writing (DLW) is a technique that allows the fabrication of three-dimensional structures with sub-100 nm resolution. It is based on multi-photon absorption; when the beam of an ultra-fast laser is tightly focused into the volume of a transparent, photosensitive material, polymerization can be initiated by non-linear absorption within the focal volume. By moving the laser focus three-dimensionally through the material, 3D structures can be fabricated. The technique has been implemented with a variety of materials and several components and devices have been fabricated such as photonic crystals, biomedical devices, and microscopic models. The unique capability of DLW lies in that it allows the fabrication of computer-designed, fully functional 3D devices. Here, we summarize the principles of microfabrication, and present our recent work in materials processing and functionalization of 3D structures. Finally, we discuss the future applications and prospects for the technology.

U.WG3.3
16:00
Authors : Dr. Antonios G. Kanaras (1), Rute Fernandes (1), Neil R. Smyth (2), Otto L. Muskens (1), Simone Nitti (3), Michael R. Ardern-Jones (2).
Affiliations : (1) Institute of Life Sciences, Faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom (2) Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom (3) Istituto Italiano di Technologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italy.

Resume : Recent advancements in nanoparticle synthesis have paved the way for their applications in biomedicine. By changing size, shape and functionality, nowadays, nanoparticles can be designed to have specific tunable properties (1-6). In this presentation we explore the interaction of advanced type of nanoparticles with biointerfaces in order to develop new design rules customized to specific biomedical applications. Our studies address different length scales (from cells to tissue). References: 1) Heuer-Jungemann, A.; Kirkwood, R.;El-Sagheer, A.; Brown, T.; Kanaras A. G. Nanoscale 2013, 5 (16), 7209-7212 2) Bartczak, D.; Muskens, O. L.;Sanchez-Elsner T.;Kanaras A. G.; Millar T. M. ACS Nano, 2013, 7 (6), pp 5628–5636 3) Bartczak, D.; Nitti, S.; Millar T.M.; Kanaras A. G. Nanoscale, 2012, 4 (15), 4470 - 4472 4) Bartczak, D.; Muskens, O. L.; Nitti, S.; Millar T. M..;Sanchez-Elsner T.;Kanaras A. G. Small, 2012, 8(1), 122-130 5) Bartczak, D.; Muskens, O. L.;Millar T.;Sanchez-Elsner T.; Kanaras A. G. NanoLett, 2011, 11 (3), 1358–1363 6) Bartczak D.; Sanchez-Elsner T.; Louafi F., Millar T.; Kanaras A. G. Small, 2011, 7, No. 3, 388–394,

U.WG3.5
 
Session WG4. Bio-devices. Chief: Prof. Josep Samitier, Univ. of Barcelona, jsamitier@pcb.ub.es : Chair: Dr.Emmanuel Stratakis, IESB-FORTH, University of Crete, Greece
17:15
Authors : Prof. Samuel Sanchez
Affiliations : Max Planck for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, Germany

Resume : Self-powered micro-motors are currently subject of a growing interest due to their visionary but potential applications in robotics, biosensing, nanomedicine, microfluidics, and environmental field. Inspired by bio-motors such as ATP synthase, artificial micromotors convert chemicals into mechanical work being self-propelled by decomposition of the fuel where they swim. Recent advances on self-propelled microrobots demonstrated the transport of micro-objects and cells and their wireless control has been achieve by magnetic guidance, temperature, chemical gradients and light as external sources. Those miniaturized devices act collectively reacting to external stimuli like chemotactic behaviour and are capable to clean polluted water. In this talk, I will address the latest developments and discoveries in the field of catalytic nanomachines from basic fundamentals to the applications. Future operations of autonomous intelligent multi-functional nanomachines will combine the sensing of hazardous chemicals using bio-inspired chemotactic search strategies, the pumping of bio-fluids, the precise delivery of drugs and the cleaning of contaminated water.

U.WG4.1
17:45
Authors : Dr. Victoria Birkedal
Affiliations : Interdisciplinary Naniscience center (iNANO) and centre for DNA nanotechnology, Aarhus University, Denmark

Resume : DNA can be used as a building block to create a number of static and even dynamic DNA structures and devices [1]. Sizes range from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Single molecule methods allow following individual molecules in action and thus obtaining a direct view of how they work. In this report, we investigated the structural dynamics of a number of DNA structures, from a DNA actuator [2] to a DNA box [3], by using single molecule F?rster resonance energy transfer. This study gave a direct insight into the assembly and performance of the studied DNA device and structures. [1] Y. Krishnan and F. C. Simmel, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50: 3124-3156, 2011. [2] Z. Zhang, E. M. Olsen, M. Kryger, N. V. Voigt, T. Torring, E. Gultekin, M. Nielsen, R. Mohammad Zadegan, E. S. Andersen, M. M., J. Kjems, V. Birkedal, K. V. Gothelf, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50: 3983-3987, 2011. [3] E. S. Andersen, Mingdong Dong, M. M. Nielsen, K. Jahn, R. Subramani, W. Mamdouh, M. M. Golas, B. Sander, H. Stark, C. L. P. Oliveira, J. S. Pedersen, V. Birkedal, F. Besenbacher, K. V. Gothelf, and J. Kjems, Nature 459: 73-75, 2009; R. M. Zadegan, M. D. E. Jepsen, K. E. Thomsen, A. H. Okholm, D. H. Schaffert, E. S. Andersen, V. Birkedal, J. Kjems, ACS Nano 6: 10050?10053, 2012.

U.WG4.2
18:15
Authors : Oleksii Dubok
Affiliations : Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Institute for problems of materials science, Kyiv, Ukraine

Resume : Bone tissue restoration after implantation of bioactive ceramics in many cases ends with the formation of coarse-fibered bone tissue in the defect site. Nevertheless, in some cases the implantation site is completely restored by lamellar bone and marrow, not distinguishable from the adjacent intact bone. This result is achieved in cases where the injury of nearby bone is minimized during implantation and at the same time the work of all enzymes and cellular systems involved in the process is balanced. To optimize this last part, we used multi-component alloying of bioactive ceramics by elements promoting the synthesis of such enzymes, as well as correcting in the right direction interaction of osteoblasts and osteoclasts at the implantation site. One of the variants of such alloying consists of doping multiphase bioactive ceramics by copper, zinc and strontium. Copper and zinc are included in a hundreds of different enzymes, and some of the enzymes contain this elements simultaneously. Therefore, to ensure the body’s possibility to independently adjust the flow of each of these elements, we have included them in various phases incorporated in the bioactive ceramic composite. It is known that strontium has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts and inhibits osteoclast activity, which is also important for the local repair of bone tissue. Alloying uniformity of each phase was achieved using precipitation of multicomponent acidic solution in concentrated alkali. As it was shown, the realization of full recovery of lamellar bone and bone marrow, similar to the intact bone was significantly increased by using the proposed approach.

U.U.Y.3
18:20
Authors : O.S. Lysenko (1), А.V. Borysenko (1)
Affiliations : 1 – Bogomolets National Medical University (Kyiv, Ukraine); dr.alex.lysenko@gmail.com

Resume : To develop effective alloplastic material for filling infected bone defects the biological properties of the bioactive ceramic nanostructured composite granules doped with 0,1-10% Ag and 0,05-5% Cu have been studied in vitro and in vivo. It is assumed that the granules consisting of hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate and bioglass-ceramics 37SiO2-36CaO-13P2O5-3MgO-0,5K2O-4,5ZnO-6B2O3 (wt%) due to their nano- and multiphase structure, placement of bioelements in different ceramic phases as well as antimicrobial action should improve bone reparative properties and biocompatibility. Tests in vitro have been conducted with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (AD-MCSs), test strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The same biocomposite have been used in vivo to study the repair of simulated bone defects in the Wistar rats’ mandible. It was found that doping of the bioceramic composite with Cu and Ag leads to the antibacterial and antifungal activity against all investigated strains, which depend on dopants concentration. Inhibition of human AD-MCSs growth have been observed for granules doped with ions more than 1 at% Ag and 0,5 at% Cu. The results of the in vivo experiments reveal that implantation of the bioceramic composite significantly improves bone reparation. Differences between bone repair with undoped biocomposite and doped with 1 at% Ag and 0,5 at% Cu were not observed.

U.U.Y.4
18:30
Authors : Anastasiya Sedova1,2, Ohad Goldbart1, Rita Rosentsveig1, Dmitry Shumalinsky3, Leonid Lobik3, H. Daniel Wagner1, Reshef Tenne1.
Affiliations : 1. Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of science, 76100 Rehovot, Israel e-mail: Reshef.Tenne@weizmann.ac.il 2. Department of Plastics Engineering, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, 12 Anna Frank Street, Ramat-Gan 52526, Israel 3. Urology Department, Barzilai Medical Center, Hahistadrout St. 2, 78278 Ashkelon, Israel

Resume : Invasive medical procedures, encountered in such fields as urology, gastroenterology, etc. make use of a plastic/metallic devices which go through narrow constrictions, in the human body, in order to diagnose medical diseases. The applied force for the insertion/extraction of the device from the human cavities must overcome the inserted device-surface human-tissue interactions. In daily practice a commercial water-based gel is applied on the endoscope/catheter surface, in order to facilitate its entry to the cavities. In the present work, a new solid-state lubricant has been added to the gel, in order to reduce the device-soft tissue interaction and alleviate the potential damage to the soft tissue. For that purpose, a urethra model was used, which allowed a quantitative assessment of the applied force for extraction of the endoscope and catheters from a soft polymer-based ring. It is shown that the addition of MoS2 nanoparticles with fullerene-like structure (IF-MoS2) and in particular rhenium-doped nanoparticles (Re: IF-MoS2) to the commercial gel applied on the devices surfaces reduced the friction substantially. The Re:IF-MoS2 showed better results than the IF-MoS2 and both performed better than the gel alone or gel made with microscopic platelets of WS2/MoS2. The mechanism of friction reduction is attributed to the fullerenes ability to roll and to act as separator between the active surfaces of the model [1]. Reference O. Goldbart et al, Tribol Lett 2014, 55, 103-109

U.U.Y.6
18:40
Authors : J. Herr, R.-A. Barb, J. Heitz, C. Hrelescu
Affiliations : Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria

Resume : Here we report on inexpensive and easy to fabricate large area plasmonic nanowire arrays for biological and chemical sensing based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Further, we demonstrate by polarized Raman spectroscopy, that our flexible large area plasmonic nanowire arrays act as remarkable SERS substrate with great potential for the study of molecular orientation distributions. Our results together with possibility to trigger the alignment and activation of cells cultivated on such substrates, render our flexible large area plasmonic nanowires arrays as the ideal structure for optical and chemical studies of cell membranes.

U.U.Y.8
19:00
Authors : Ch. Yiannakou1,2 , Ch. Simitzi 1,2 , A. Ranella 1, C. Fotakis 1,2, E. Stratakis1,2
Affiliations : 1. Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (F.O.R.T.H.), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (I.E.S.L.), Heraklion, Crete, Greece 2. University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece

Resume : The aim of this work was to study the effect of micro – and- nano- topography on Schwann cell response by proper tuning of the structural and chemical characteristics of Si surfaces. For this purpose, a variety of micro- and nanometer-scale structures have been fabricated on Si using femtosecond laser patterning in liquid enviroment. Structures fabricated include periodic micron and/or nanometer-sized ripples or posts, exhibiting different optical and wetting properties. It is shown that hierarchical micro nano silicon substrates can support Schwann (SW10) cell outgrowth in a variable way. In particular it is observed that cell outgrowth increases as the substrate micro-roughness becomes pronounced. Besides this, cell response is remarkably influenced upon shifting from micro to nano-topography, while as micro-roughness is enhanced there is a tendency for preferred orientation of Schwann cells outgrowth.

U.U.P I.2
19:05
Authors : Oleksii Dubok
Affiliations : Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Institute for problems of materials science, Kyiv, Ukraine

Resume : Bone tissue restoration after implantation of bioactive ceramics in many cases ends with the formation of coarse-fibered bone tissue in the defect site. Nevertheless, in some cases the implantation site is completely restored by lamellar bone and marrow, not distinguishable from the adjacent intact bone. This result is achieved in cases where the injury of nearby bone is minimized during implantation and at the same time the work of all enzymes and cellular systems involved in the process is balanced. To optimize this last part, we used multi-component alloying of bioactive ceramics by elements promoting the synthesis of such enzymes, as well as correcting in the right direction interaction of osteoblasts and osteoclasts at the implantation site. One of the variants of such alloying consists of doping multiphase bioactive ceramics by copper, zinc and strontium. Copper and zinc are included in a hundreds of different enzymes, and some of the enzymes contain this elements simultaneously. Therefore, to ensure the body’s possibility to independently adjust the flow of each of these elements, we have included them in various phases incorporated in the bioactive ceramic composite. It is known that strontium has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts and inhibits osteoclast activity, which is also important for the local repair of bone tissue. Alloying uniformity of each phase was achieved using precipitation of multicomponent acidic solution in concentrated alkali. As it was shown, the realization of full recovery of lamellar bone and bone marrow, similar to the intact bone was significantly increased by using the proposed approach.

U.U.P I.3
19:05
Authors : Oleksandr Lysenko, Anatoliy Borysenko (1), Oleksii Dubok (2)
Affiliations : 1)Bogomolets National Medical University (Kyiv, Ukraine); 2) Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine; al_dubok@mail.ru

Resume : Contemporary technology enables to create a synthetic bone graft that rivals their capabilities of natural origin biomaterials. However, it is possible to modify the synthetic material to increase biocompatibility and regulate biodegradation time and add new osteostimulation, angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory properties, etc. We have been planned and synthesized biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics with crystals range in several tens nanometers. The biphasic ceramics (30%) was combined with glass-ceramics (70%) selected composition to form the bioactive ceramic composite (BCC). During a synthesis, the bioceramic composite granules (0,3-0,8 mm) were directly modified by additional doping with silver and copper ion's combination at 2:1 ratio within 10 at% and 5 at% range accordingly.

U.U.P I.4
19:05
Authors : David Harvey, Dr Philip Bardelang, Dr Sara Goodacre, Assoc. Prof. Noah Russell and Prof. Neil R. Thomas*
Affiliations : School of Chemistry, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham

Resume : Spider silk is one of nature’s wonder materials and is known for being stronger than high tensile steel and tougher than Kevlar. This, combined with an intrinsic bio inertness, biodegradability and ability to adopt various morphologies other than fibres, make spider silks attractive candidates for tissue engineering matrices, cell scaffolds and topical drug delivery vehicles. The production of recombinant silk from their spidroins, the protein precursors of fibres, is fraught with difficulties. Low spidroin solubility, low production yields and a requirement to artificially spin the spidroin into fibres using harsh solvents raises production costs and negatively impacts their biological applications. Novel silk films created from genetically engineered spidroin genes, and chemically modified spidroin protein have enabled the presentation of simple peptides such as RGD domains on a silk matrix; resulting in improved interaction with fibroblasts (Wohlrab et al., 2012). Here we demonstrate the recombinant production and specific chemical modification of a soluble miniature silk spidroin derived from Euprosthenops australis (Stark et al., 2007). We aim to decorate these silks with a range of functional molecules, allowing the silks to be custom designed, matching specific functionalities to a particular application. Our progress developing these silks will be presented here. Key References Stark, M., Grip, S., Rising, A., Hedhammar, M., Engström, W., Hjälm, G., & Johansson, J. (2007). Macroscopic Fibers Self-Assembled from Recombinant Miniature Spider Silk Proteins. Biomacromolecules, 8(5), 1695–1701. doi:10.1021/bm070049y Wohlrab, S., Müller, S., Schmidt, A., Neubauer, S., Kessler, H., Leal-Egaña, A., & Scheibel, T. (2012). Cell adhesion and proliferation on RGD-modified recombinant spider silk proteins. Biomaterials, 33(28), 6650–9. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.05.069 Acknowledgements I would like to thank the BBSRC for funding this project and Dr Jon Bull for completing preliminary work.

U.U.P I.7
19:05
Authors : J. Herr, R.-A. Barb, J. Heitz, C. Hrelescu
Affiliations : Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria

Resume : Here we report on inexpensive and easy to fabricate large area plasmonic nanowire arrays for biological and chemical sensing based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Further, we demonstrate by polarized Raman spectroscopy, that our flexible large area plasmonic nanowire arrays act as remarkable SERS substrate with great potential for the study of molecular orientation distributions. Our results together with possibility to trigger the alignment and activation of cells cultivated on such substrates, render our flexible large area plasmonic nanowires arrays as the ideal structure for optical and chemical studies of cell membranes.

U.U.P I.8
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SESSION II.1 Biological and Biomimetic synthesized nanomaterials, surfaces, interfaces: from biological supramolecules , stem cells, neuronal cells to tissues at surfaces, interfaces engineering and functionality : In collaboration with invited Organizers – Chairs: Prof. Dr. Masaru Tanaka, Dep. of Biochemical Engineering, Yamagata University, Japan, mtanaka@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Prof. Dr. Insung S. Choi. KAIST- CHEM, Daejeon, Korea, ischoi@kaist.ac.kr; Prof. Dr. Ficham Fenniri, Dep. Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, USA, h.fenniri@neu.edu and Prof. Dr. Andreas Schober, Dep. of Nano-biosystem technology, Institute for Chemistry and Biotechnology, TU Ilmenau, Germany, andreas.schober@tu-ilmenau.de; Prof. Karsten Haupt, Compiègne University of Technology, CNRS Institute for Enzyme and Cell Engineering, France, karsten.haupt@utc.fr
08:45
Authors : Prof. Dr. Hicham Fenniri
Affiliations : Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA, h.fenniri@neu.edu

Resume : Organic chemistry offers tremendous opportunities for the synthesis of small molecules with the ability to spontaneously self-organize into well-defined supramolecular architectures under a defined set of physical conditions. Over the past several years we have developed and utilized a new class of heteropolycyclic molecules to explore hydrogen bonding in water, self-replication in auto-catalytic systems, supramolecular chirality, and the underlying physical phenomena of self-assembly and self-organization processes. With this knowledge in hand, we were able to tailor the chemical, physical, and biological properties of 1-D tubular nanostructures for applications in the emerging fields of organic electronics, photovoltaics, nanobiotechnology, and nanomedicine. This lecture is an overview of the design, synthesis, and physical characterization of self-assembled organic nanotubes, and their biomedical applications.

U.U II.1.1
09:25
Authors : Professor Dr. Andreas Schober, M. Gebinoga, S. Singh, U. Fernekorn, J. Hampl, G. Schlingloff.
Affiliations : Dep. of Nano-biosystem technology, Institute for Chemistry and Biotechnology, TU Ilmenau, Germany; andreas.schober@tu-ilmenau.de; www.tu-ilmenau.de/en/nano-biosystem-technology

Resume : Combining modern methods in microsystem technology with the latest advancements in the life sciences, namely those in tissue engineering and advanced cell culturing, is promoting the development of a promising toolbox for modeling biological systems. The core problem to solve using this toolbox is the design of 3D artificial cellular environments, both in fluidic systems and on solid substrates. The construction of 3D cell cultures on substrates involves various fabrication techniques which use different polymers and biopolymers processed by micromachining, chemical pattern guided cell cultivation, photopolymerization, and organ printing methods. These methods together have the potential to create an artificial system with the complete hierarchical, geometrical, and functional organization found in an actual biological system [1]. Starting from our work concerning 3D cultivation as a first step towards more biological modelling of cellular environments [2] we performed different studies concerning the use of such systems as pharmacological test platforms [3], the different genetic behaviour of the cells in 2 D and 3D [4], different structuring techniques [5, 6] towards the integration of different organ like systems on one chip [7]. In this contribution we will explain our approach to gain complex cellular structures while using chemical and mechanical modification of thin polymer foils. Due to folding and stacking of this pre manufactured cell sheet layers it is possible to achieve complex cellular and fluidic entities which are integrated in micro bioreactor systems.With the combined application of different methods it is possible to mimic complex tissue like structures of different organs. Preferable with the liver lobe we demonstrate the construction schema of such a multilayer techniques.We will discuss the different methods of designing such structures. Open questions of co-cultivation different cell types, structuring Disso space like areas and the methods thereof will be analyzed and conclusions are given. The liver plays a crucial role for the metabolism of both nutrients and drugs. Understanding and modelling of organomimetic cultivation substrates is a key technology with high potential for future developments in pharmaceutical drug discovery and tissue engineering.[1] A. Schober, U. Fernekorn, S. Singh, G. Schlingloff, M. Gebinoga, J. Hampl, A. Williamson, “Biotechnical multi-scale engineering mimicking the biological world ”, Eng. Life Sci. 2013, 13, 352–367;[2] A. Schober, C. Augspurger, G. Schlingloff, M. Gebinoga, M. Worgull, M. Schneider, C. Hildmann, U. Fernekorn, F. Weise, J. Hampl, L. Silveira, I. Cimalla, B. Lübbers, “Microfluidics and Biosensors as Tools for NanoBioSystems research with applications in the Life Science”, Materials Science and Engineering: B 169 (2010), 174-181;[3] U. Fernekorn, J. Hampl, F. Weise, C. Augspurger, C. Hildmann, M. Klett, A. Läffert, M. Gebinoga, K.F. Weibezahn, G. Schlingloff, M. Worgull, M. Schneider, A. Schober, Microbioreactor design for 3-D cell cultivation to create a pharmacological screening system; Eng. Life Sci. 2011, 11, No. 2, 133-139;[4] Fernekorn U., Hampl, J., Augsburger C., Hildmann Ch., Weise F., Klett M., Läffert A., Gebinoga M., Williamson A, Schober A., In vitro cultivation of biopsy derived primary hepatocytes leads to a more metabolic genotype in perfused 3D scaffolds than static 3D cell culture, RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 16558-16568;[5] M. Gebinoga, J. Katzmann, U. Fernekorn, J. Hampl, F.Weise, M. Klett, A. Läffert, T. Klar, A. Schober, “Multiphoton structuring of native polymers: A case study for structuring natural proteins”, Eng. Life Sci. 2013, 13,, Issue 4, pages 368–375;[6] J. Tobola, Schober et al. „Thermoforming techniques for manufacturing porous scaffolds for application in 3D cell cultivation” to be submitted;[7] Williamson A., Singh S., Fernekorn U., Schober A., The future of the patient-specific Body-on-a-chip, Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 3471-3480 The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013

U.U II.1.2
10:05
Authors : Prof. Dr. Yoshikatsu Akiyama, Masayuki Yamato and Teruo Okano
Affiliations : Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, yakiyama@abmes.twmu.ac.jp

Resume : emperature-responsive cell culture surfaces (TRCS), which is tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS) modified with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) (PIPAAm-TCPS), has been used for the fabrication of various types of single monolayer sheets such as epithelium keratinocyte, corneal epithelial cell, oral mucosal epithelial cell, urothelial cell, periodontal ligament, cardiomyocyte, hepatocyte cell sheets, and so on. Various types of cell sheets have been directly transplanted to reconstruct tissue, and some of them are clinically applied. PIPAAm-TCPS has been conventionally prepared by using electron beam (EB) irradiation and is currently released as commercially available products. However, the competitive price is desired for the commercially available PIPAAm-TCPS because of the expensive price. And also a lot of researchers would like to have an opportunity to prepare and investigate characteristic of TRCS by themselves. More facile methods for the preparation of PIPAAm-TCPS have been alternatively required without the expensive and special EB irradiation. In addition, highly-functional TRCS have been developed for the fabrication of elaborate cell sheets. In this presentation, we will show facile and alternative method for the preparation of TRCS and the recent development of highly-functional TRCS.

U.U II.1.3
11:00
Authors : Prof. Dr. Insung S. Choi
Affiliations : Center for Cell-Encapsulation Research, Department of Chemistry, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Korea

Resume : Nature has found cryptobiotic ways to preserve genetic information and protect cellular components against external stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, desiccation, high temperatures, radiation, and caustic chemicals. For example, a bacterial endospore, usually formed in response to nutrient deficiency, is a non-dividing, dormant body, which possesses a thin but tough proteinaceous coat at its outmost layer. Beneath the coat is a buffering cortex layer of peptidoglycan. This hierarchical shell structure allows the endospore to survive for many years (in some cases, up to millions of years) under hostile conditions found naturally that can easily and quickly kill normal cells. Recent studies have sought to chemically control and tailor the metabolic behaviors of non-spore-forming cells, as well as enhancing their viability against adverse environmental conditions, by forming thin (<100 nm), tough artificial shells. These living "cell-in-shell" structures, called artificial spores (chemically-formed spore-like structures), enable control of cell division, protection against physical and chemical stresses, and cell-surface functionalizability, as well as providing the cells with exogenous properties that are not innate to the cells but are introduced chemically, such as magnetism, heat-tolerance, and UV-resistance.

U.U II.1.4
12:05
Authors : Professor Karsten Haupt, Paolo Bonomi, Serena Ambrosini, Selim Beyazit, Bernadette Tse Sum Bui
Affiliations : Compiègne University of Technology, CNRS Institute for Enzyme and Cell Engineering CS60319 Rue Roger Couttolenc, 60203 Compiègne, France.

Resume : Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are synthetic antibody mimics ('plastic antibodies') that specifically recognize molecular targets.1-3 They are highly cross-linked polymers that are synthesized through the polymerization of monomers bearing suitable functional groups, in the presence of the target molecule acting as a molecular template. This templating induces three-dimensional binding sites in the polymer that are complementary to the template in terms of size, shape and chemical functionality. Thus, the plastic antibody can recognize and bind its target with an affinity and selectivity similar to a biological antibody. We present here a new approach allowing for the synthesis of MIP by controlled/living radical polymerization using a dendritic multiiniferter.4 This results in protein-size, soluble MIP nanogels with a homogeneous size distribution. Their mean diameter is 17 nm and the average molecular weight 97 kDa, thus their size and density are very close to those of biological antibodies. The MIP nanogels show specific binding of their targets, small organic molecules or proteins, with a nanomolar affinity and a good selectivity. We also present new methods to prepare MIPs specific for proteins based on solid-phase synthesis around the immobilised template,5 or in solution using anchoring monomers.6 In addition, the direct coating of thin MIP films around functional inorganic cores (magnetic nanoparticles,7 quantum dots, upconverting nanoparticles8) by localized photopolymerization will be described. The use of these functional nanomaterials for enzyme inhibition,6 enzyme stabilization, for sensing,9 and for cell and tissue imaging will be discussed. [1]. R, Arshady, K. Mosbach, Makromol. Chem. 1981, 182, 687-692. [2]. G. Wulff, A. Sarhan, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 1972, 11, 341. [3]. K. Haupt, A.V. Linares, M. Bompart, B. Tse Sum Bui, Top. Curr. Chem. 2012, 325, 1-28. [4]. P. Çakir, A. Cutivet, M. Resmini, B. Tse Sum Bui, K. Haupt, Adv. Mater. 2013, 25, 1048-1051. [5]. S. Ambrosini, S. Beyazit, K. Haupt, B. Tse Sum Bui, Chem. Commun. 2013, 49, 6746-6748. [6]. A. Cutivet, C. Schembri, J. Kovensky, K. Haupt, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14699-14702. [7]. C. Gonzato, M. Courty, P. Pasetto, K. Haupt, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2011, 21, 3947-3953. [8]. S. Beyazit, S. Ambrosini, N. Marchyk, E. Palo, V. Kale, T. Soukka, B. Tse Sum Bui, K. Haupt, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014 (in press, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201403576). [9] M. Bompart, Y. De Wilde, K. Haupt, Adv. Mater. 2010, 22, 2343-2348.

U.U II.1.6
 
SESSION II.2. Biomimetic ceramics, composites and surfaces technologies and biofunctions in vitro, in vivo to scaffold and implant engineering : In collaboration with invited Chairs: Prof. Osamu Suzuki, Division of Craniofacial Function (CFE) Tohoku University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Japan , suzuki-o@m.tohoku.ac.jp; and Prof. Lia Rimondini, Lab.of Biomedical and Dental Materials, Dep. of Heals Sciences, Univesita del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogardo”, Novara, Italy, lia.rimondini@med.unipmn.it. Assisted by Researcher Oleksii Dubok, Department of analitycal chemistry and functional ceramics, Institute for problems of Materials science, Kyiv, Ukraine
13:30
Authors : Prof. Osamu SUZUKI 1*, Takahisa ANADA 1, Kentaro SUZUKI 2, Takuto HANDA 3, Shinpei CHIBA 4, Keisuke SAITO 1, and Eiji ITOI 4
Affiliations : 1. Division of Craniofacial Function Engineering, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575, Japan, *E-mail: suzuki-o@m.tohoku.ac.jp; 2. Miyagai Cancer Center, Natori 981-1293, Japan; 3. Shinoda General Hospital, Yamagata 990-0045, Japan; 4. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8574, Japan

Resume : Synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) displays a highly osteoconductive property which is induced by stimulating osteoblastic cells to differentiate through a progressive conversion process from OCP to hydroxyapatite (HA) [1]. However, OCP cannot be sintered under maintaining the original crystal phase due to the inclusion of large amount of water molecules in the structure. We have shown that the moldability and implantability can be markedly improved by combining OCP with several natural polymers. The addition of hyaluronic acids (HyAs) allows OCP granules, having several hundreds μm diameter, to form hydrogel-like materials and be injectable [2]. OCP/HyAs can be relatively easily injected into PTFE ring, a model space of bone augmentation, placed onto mouse calvaria using a syringe. The osteocondutivity of OCP/HyAs was significantly higher than that of OCP granules alone but their biological performances were dependent on the molecular weight of HyAs used. The mixing OCP with gelatin (Gel) molecules and the cross-linking of the Gel matrix allows OCP to be porous and 3D form in which the host osteoblastic cells in vivo could be easily invaded [3]. OCP can be co-precipitated with Gel molecules in a specified condition so that the OCP crystals were dispersed highly homogenously in the Gel matrix. The effect of OCP/Gel implantation was confirmed in rat calvaria critical-sized defect and in rabbit tibia defect, which showed a highly biodegradable property of OCP/Gel coupled with an active new bone formation [3,4]. Thus, OCP-based materials can easily be molded for the designed shape to substitute such bone defects and show highly osteoconductivity. The biological performance and the handling property of OCP-based materials we developed so far will be presented along with the elucidated mechanisms to show the osteoconductivity from the view point of biomaterial science. References: [1] Suzuki O et al. Biomaterials 2006, 27:2671, [2] Suzuki K et al. Acta Biomater 2014, 10:531, [3] Handa T et al. Acta Biomater 2012, 8:1190, [4] Suzuki K et al. Phosphorus Res Bull, 2012, 26 (Special Issue) 53.

U.U II.2.1
13:50
Authors : Professor Franck Tancret (1), J.T. Zhang (1,2), W. Liu (1,2), P. Weiss (2), J.M. Bouler (2)
Affiliations : (1) Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, Polytech Nantes, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes Cedex 3, France ; (2) Laboratoire d’Ingénierie Ostéo-Articulaire et Dentaire (LIOAD), Université de Nantes, BP 84215, 44042 Nantes Cedex 1, France

Resume : Calcium Phosphate Cements (CPCs) are more and more used as bone substitutes, but a number of technological issues still need to be addressed, in particular on the improvement of mechanical properties. The present work aims at reviewing recent works on the links between microstructure (porosity at different scales, nature and amount of polymer additives…) and several mechanical properties, may they concern elastic behaviour (Young’s modulus) or fracture behaviour (toughness and tolerance to damage), in relation with processing (strength and its statistical Weibull analysis). Ways to produce a variety of microstructures will be described (changing the liquid-to-powder ratio in the cement paste, incorporating porogenic agents, adding cellulose ethers and derivatives…) and their influence on both handling properties (injectability, cohesion…) and mechanical properties will be discussed, in an attempt to propose strategies for material optimisation. In particular, it is shown that the addition of some polymeric additives can improve fracture toughness, induce a good tolerance to damage, give the cement paste excellent injectability and cohesion at early age, and lead to interesting porous microstructures in view of biomedical applications.

U.U II.2.2
 
SESSION III. Nanocharacterization within nanoimaging of biological, biomimetic, biosynthesized materials: fundamentals of SPM with IR, Raman images. Biocompatible implanted nanomaterials for improvement biomedical images. : In collaboration with invited Organizers – Chairs: Prof.Dr. Volodymyr Karbivskiy, SPM&RS – Centre, IPM NASU, Kyiv, Ukraine and Prof. Dr. Stanislaus S. Wong Department of Chemistry SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA
16:00
Authors : Professor Dr.Volodymyr L. Karbivskiy
Affiliations : SPM@RS - Centre, IMP NASU, Kyiv,Ukraine karb@imp.kiev.ua

Resume : Biomaterials nanocharacterization fundamentals are based on surface electronic structure testing and nanoimaging atoms at a surface and morphology due to adaptation of ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope JSPM-4610,JEOL and NMR and EPR,BRUKER spectrometers In result ,has been developed methodics of a research and practical applications in innovative nanotechnology, for example, biomimetic nanoparticles of bioceramics.. In the SPM&RS-Centre, there is the capability to use for nanocharacterization such methods as scanning tunneling microscopy, tunneling and magnetic spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and electronic paramagnetic resonance, which allow to study at qualitatively new level such physical quantities as the DOS distribution, electron work function distribution, volt-ampere characteristics, surface conductance, atomic and electronic structure, electron-nuclear system dynamics, and to visualize individual atoms on the surface and morphology of a surface and nanoparticles for nanobiomaterials.

U.U III.1
16:30
Authors : M. Venanzi,a M. Caruso,a G. Bocchinfuso,a E. Gatto,a A. Palleschi,a C. Aleman,b D. Zanuy,b F. Formaggio,c C. Toniolo, c
Affiliations : a Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Roma, Italia b Department of Chemical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Catalunya, E-08028, Barcelona, Spain c ICB,Unità di Padova, CNR Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 1 , 35131, Padova, Italia

Resume : Peptide aggregation is determined by a complex interplay of dynamical and structural factors, including the secondary structure attained by the peptide chain and its dynamical properties, the interactions between the peptide chains, the solvation of single peptide molecules, the presence of residues giving rise to specific site-to-site interactions (aromatic side-chains, charged groups, sulphur atoms). All these factors govern the formation of peptide aggregates of different morphologies (nanospheres, fibrils, nanotubes). In this contribution we report on two case studies concerning the aggregation propensity of conformationally constrained oligopeptides, i.e. peptides formed almost exclusively by Cα-tetrasubstituted residues. In the former, we discuss the aggregation of homoAib oligopeptides of different length (n=6, 12, 15) in methanol/water solution. Experiments showed that the aggregation propensity increases with increasing the length of the peptide chain. When the peptides are immobilized on mica, the interplay of aromatic-aromatic and helix-helix interactions determines the morphology of the peptide aggregates, as revealed by AFM imaging. In the second system investigated, the aggregation properties of two Ala-based pentapeptides were studied by spectroscopic techniques and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The two peptides, both functionalized at the N-terminus with a pyrenyl group, differ in the insertion of an α-aminoisobutyric acid at position 4. This single substitution is crucial in determining the aggregation propensity and the morphology of mesoscopic aggregates.

U.U III.3
16:45
Authors : Chiung Wen Kuo, Peilin Chen
Affiliations : Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan.

Resume : Cell adhesion-associated proteins, which include integrin family, focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, vinculin, zyxin, talin, Src, actin, and etc., are the important components in controlling the cell behavior, such as the intracellular and extracellular signal transduction, cell adhesion, motility and migration, embryonic development, tissue function, inflammation, and wound healing. Because these cell behaviors can be regulated by multiple adhesion-associated proteins, it is difficult to obtain the contribution from individual proteins using conventional optical imaging. In this report, we have investigated the formation of the cell adhesion on the nano-patterned extracellular matrix using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When the cells attach or migrate on the extracellular matrix, such as the fibronectin and collagen, nano-patterned surfaces, the formation of focal adhesion can be manipulated by the extracellular matrix nano-patterns. However, the conventional optical imaging cannot be used to visualize the individual proteins on the fibronectin nano-patterned surface, due to the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, the multi-color super-resolution localization imaging was used to investigate the response of the cell adhesion-associated proteins on the fibronectin nano-patterned surfaces. The spatial correlation of the cell adhesion-associated proteins has been investigated by super-resolution fluorescence imaging with a few tens of nanometers spatial resolution. Combining the protein pair correlation analysis, it quantitatively provides the molecular information of the cell adhesion-associated proteins in the different types of focal adhesions. We will also present the studies of aritifical ceullar environements by advanced imaging tools such as AFM, Raman microscpy, nonlinear optical imaging, and TOF-SIMS.

U.U III.4
17:30
Authors : Oleksii Dubok, Olexandr Ivanyuta, E.Buzaneva (1), D.I.Zabolotny, H.A.Karas , L.D.Kryvohatska, .O.Yatsenko,S.P.Chayka,O.A.Hrushova (2)
Affiliations : (1) Institute for Problem of Material Science NASU and TSN University of Kyiv, Ukraine (2) O.S. Kolomyichenko Otolaryngology Institute NA Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv,Ukraine

Resume : To the purpose of modeling processes after implantation of bioactive synthesized HAp ceramic and to evaluate bioadhesion to cell culture, biofilm growth and cytotoxicity of domestic bioactive ceramic on different stages of their interaction with the environment of tissue in vitro studies have been carried out using cell cultures. The conventional method of culturing cells have been used with HEP- 2 cells in DMEM culture medium (Sigma, USA) and with addition of penicillin, streptomycin and 5% fetal calf serum in 24 well plates in an incubator at 37 ° C in atmosphere with 5% СО2.. The replacement of the culture medium performed daily. Powder of composed nanoparticles of nanocomposite hydroxyapatite (HAp) - tricalcium phosphate (TCP) (80 : 20%) (particle has size 25 - 40 nm, granules - 0.3 -0.5 mm, pore - 50 - 150mkm) has been synthesized. In two parallel experiments the freshly calcite ceramics have been used or the same ceramics that was modified by overnight exposure in helofuzyn. The cells investigation by the microscopy and fluorescent inverted microscope methods carried out. All experiments showed tight adhesion of cells to ceramic and active multilayered cell growth at the surface and near area. It was reveal what the fresh calcite ceramics inhibit of cell growth was observed during the first 1.5 - 2 days compared to the ceramics modified by helofuzyn. Fluorescent study also found a higher level of luminescence of nuclei and cytoplasm of cells near and on the modified ceramics at the first few days of cultivation, reflecting the increase in their proliferate activity. These features can be explained by the active adsorption at the surface of fresh calcite ceramics of components of the culture solution and the excretion of some elements from these surfaces accumulated on them due to segregation processes during calcination. These processes are especially significant during first time after implantation and are accompanying by local changes in pH and ionic composition of the solution, which causes an initial delay in cell growth.

U.U.P II.4
17:30
Authors : Tatsuya MIYAZAKI 1, Kentaro SUZUKI 1,2, Takahisa ANADA 1, Naohisa MIYATAKE 2, Masami HOSAKA 1, Hideki IMAIZUMI 2, Eiji ITOI 2, and Osamu SUZUKI 1*
Affiliations : 1. Division of Craniofacial Function Engineering, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575, Japan, *E-mail: suzuki-o@m.tohoku.ac.jp; 2. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8574, Japan; suzuki-o@m.tohoku.ac.jp

Resume : We have previously shown that synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) combined with hyaluronic acid (HyA) has an injectable characteristic and enhances osteoconductive property more than that by OCP alone [1]. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HyA and OCP on the osteoclastic differentiation of murine macrophage RAW264 cells in vitro. 48-well plastic culture plate was prepared by coating the particles of OCP. Sodium hyaluronic acid medical products with different molecular weights, 9x105 (HA 90), 19x105 (HA 190) and 60x105 (a chemically-modified derivative of sodium HyA, HA 600) were used as the additives in the cell culture medium. Under the stimulation of RAW264 cells with RANKL, the appearance of TRAP positive multinuclear cells increased in the presence of HyAs when cultured without OCP coating as reported previously [1]. The significant increase was observed in the presence of HyA 90 or HyA 600 [1]. When the cells were cultured on OCP coating, although the TRAP staining was apparent as reported in the co-culturing of osteoblasts and osteoclast precursor cells [2], the staining seemed to be enhanced by the HyAs treatment in the same manner without OCP. It is probable that the enhancement of these HyAs on the osteoclast differentiation in vitro is associated with increasing the osteoconductive property of OCP with HyAs observed in the previous in vivo study [1]. These results suggest that HyAs may have an influence on the osteoconductivity of OCP by up-regulating the osteoclastic resorption activity. References: [1] Suzuki K et al. Acta Biomater 10:531-543, 2014; [2] Takami M et al. Tissue Eng Part A 15:3991-4000, 2009.

U.U.P II.8
17:35
Authors : Oleksandr Lysenko, Anatoliy Borysenko (1), Oleksii Dubok (2)
Affiliations : 1)Bogomolets National Medical University (Kyiv, Ukraine); 2) Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine; al_dubok@mail.ru

Resume : Contemporary technology enables to create a synthetic bone graft that rivals their capabilities of natural origin biomaterials. However, it is possible to modify the synthetic material to increase biocompatibility and regulate biodegradation time and add new osteostimulation, angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory properties, etc. We have been planned and synthesized biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics with crystals range in several tens nanometers. The biphasic ceramics (30%) was combined with glass-ceramics (70%) selected composition to form the bioactive ceramic composite (BCC). During a synthesis, the bioceramic composite granules (0,3-0,8 mm) were directly modified by additional doping with silver and copper ion's combination at 2:1 ratio within 10 at% and 5 at% range accordingly. The aim was to explore the antimicrobial activity and to investigate the cytotoxic properties of the modified bioceramics in vitro. The cytotoxicity tests have been conducted in human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MCSs) culture to investigate the biocompatibility of the BCC samples. The antimicrobial properties have been determined by the degree of stunting bacterial cultures. As a test-microorganisms have been used the strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. It was determined extracts of the modified ceramic samples had no significant effect on cell proliferation within 1 at% Ag+ and 0,5 at% Cu2+ range. Meanwhile, the BCC sample's granules in such ion concentration in direct cytotoxicity test caused cell death in culture. By vital fluorescein diacetate staining and fluorescence microscopy it was confirmed the adhesion of MSCs to the modified bioceramic's granules. It was found that the synthetic implant material doped with silver and copper ions starting from 0,5 at% Ag+ and 0,25 at% Cu2+ range revealed the antibacterial and antimycotic effects, which depend on additions concentration. Selected bioceramic composite doped with a combination of silver and copper ions within 1 at% and 0,5 at% range respectively does not exhibit cytotoxic effect and does not inhibit MSCs adhesion and provides moderately expressed antimicrobial activity.

U.U.P II.9
18:35
Authors : Iryna Bozhyk (1), O.Dubok, O.Ivanyuta, Ya.Kyshenko (2), D.Zabolotny, H. Karas (3), V.Karbovskyy (4)
Affiliations : 1) LLC "I-PLANT" 2) TSN University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine; 3) O.S. Kolomyichenko Otolargngology Institute NAMSU, Kyiv; 4) Inatitute for Metal Physics, SPM&RS - Centre, NASU, Kyiv, Ukraine

Resume : Biochips are attracting large interest in cell biology as functional tools to perform quick and extensive cell studies by integrating different functions in a single chip. In this respect, impedance spectroscopy (IS) is an emerging read-out technique since the immobilization/adhesion of cells on biofunctionalized ceramic scaffold to the cell before bone tissue regeneration. The resistance are correlated to cell number, adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. These biochips are very cheap and reusable and represent a robust method to count cells with great sensitivity without detaching/destroying them (a crucial property for further assays such as migration tests and/or cytotoxicity tests): In addition we have used the biochip to monitor the adhesion between two different cell type, endothelial cells and leukaemia cells.

U.U.P III.4
18:35
Authors : Strebezhev V.V., Strebezhev V.M., Vorobets H.I.
Affiliations : Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University; g.vorobets@chnu.edu.ua

Resume : In developing optical biosensors, whose work is based on the determination of the spectral absorption characteristics of organic matter, it is necessary to apply cutting optical filters for the selection of certain infrared ranges of the spectrum. The work carried out to develop multilayer thin film interference filters with replaceable cutting position limits infrared radiation depending on the concentration and type of the studied compounds. The peculiarity of these filters is using semiconductor crystals In4Se3 and In4Te3 as substrates for thin-film multilayer coating. Crystals In4Se3 and In4Te3 are layered and well separated by cleavage planes (100), which allows us to produce plates required for the optical cell thickness without cutting and processing operations. The fundamental absorption, which is caused by the corresponding band gap (0.65 eV for In4Se3 to 0.48 eV for In4Te3), provides the absorption component of the functioning of the filter. High spectral characteristics, stability, resistance to chemicals and atmospheric single crystals In4Se3, In4Te3 enable design based on these filters with = 1,7-6,5 um different positions of shortwave radiation limits cutting range and a maximum transmittance Tmax = 91-95%. The method of SEM studies depending on the structure of thin films - component filters ZnS, SiO, Ge, Te, SrF2 on technological factors and the effect of organic compounds on spectral and mechanical stability of the multilayer coating. The design of the active cell optical biosensor developed using IR filters.

U.U.P III.9
18:35
Authors : Beata Kalska-Szostko, Urszula Wykowska, Dariusz Satuła
Affiliations : Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok, Poland; Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok, Poland; kalska@uwb.edu.pl

Resume : In last decades biorelated nanocomposites become driving force for huge number of investigations. For example combination of the magnetic nanowires with bioactive molecules leads to an interesting hybrid system which combine properties of nanostructures and bioparticle in one spices. In such manner specific recognition or catalytic properties of biomaterials are convoluted with the attractive electronic, optical, magnetic and structural characteristics of magnetic nanowires. However, to obtain biocomposite, nanostructures should be properly functionalized what can be realized by various linkage chemistries. Functional compounds can be directly bonded with organic molecules or via connectors like glutaraldehyde. The other option is noncovalent interactions with fatty acids, proteins.. Different ligands with different affinity both to the modified surfaces and bioparticles can be obtained: -SH, -COOH, -OP, -CN. The reason why magnetic nanostructures/nanowires are considered as a promising candidate of biocomposite constituents is their magnetic properties, which gives fast and easy manipulation tool with use of external magnetic field. Structural and magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles and composites will be tested by: XRD, TEM, IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

U.U.P III.10
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SESSION IV. Bioactive nano –particles, –clusters, -systems and -surfaces, -interfaces technology and functionality. ONE DAY SESSION : In collaboration with Invited Organizer – Chair Dr. Ovidiu Crisan, National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania ocrisan@infim.ro. In collaboration with Res. Groups : Professor Dr. Johannes Heitz, (Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria), and Dr. Duncan Satherland (inano Center, Aarhus University, Denmark), Dr. Luidmyla Reznichenko (Institute of Colloidal Chemistry, NASU, Kyiv, Ukraine)
13:00
Authors : Olivier Deschaume, Bert De Roo, Margriet J. Van Bael, Jean-Pierre Locquet, Chris Van Haesendonck, Carmen Bartic
Affiliations : Laboratory of Solid State Physics and Magnetism, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium; olivier.deschaume@fys.kuleuven.be

Resume : Protein-based scaffolds are actively investigated for the controlled assembly of advanced multifunctional materials taking advantage of the best of both inorganic and biological building blocks [1]. Due to their hybrid nature and novel properties, such materials have the potential to answer the current challenges and needs in applications including biosensing or regenerative medicine. In this study, amyloid protein nanofibres prepared from hen egg white lysozyme are used to specifically mediate the assembly of gold nanoparticles into regular arrays from solutions to different silicon oxide surfaces. The effect of nanoparticle size and deposition conditions on the self-assembly process is investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The periodic nanoparticle arrangement observed is mainly influenced by inter-particle interactions rather than by the presence of specific binding groups at the surface of the template. For a fixed ionic strength and particle concentration, the distance between nanoparticles increases with nanoparticle diameter and this trend fits well with calculated interparticle potential values. In turn, optical properties measured by UV-Vis on large surfaces are correlated with particle arrangements observed at the nanoscale. 1. F. Leroux, M. Gysemans, S. Bals, K. J. Batenburg, J. Snauwaert, T. Verbiest, C. Van Haesendonck, G. Van Tendeloo, Adv. Mater., 2010, 22(19), 2193-7.

U.U IV.1
13:15
Authors : Prof. Dr. Johannes Heitz (1), J. Herr (1), R-A. Barb (1), C. Hrelescu (1), B. Magnus (2), R. Marksteiner (2). www.johannesheitz.at
Affiliations : (1) Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, (2) Innovacell Biotechnologie AG, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Resume : Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are frequently observed coherent structures in laser surface processing. For polyethylene terephthalate (PET), LIPSS can be induced by irradiation with linearly polarized ns-pulsed UV laser light at fluences well below the ablation threshold. The lateral period of the observed LIPSS is close to the wavelength of the laser light divided by the effective index of refraction neff (about 1.3). Gold or silver nanowires can be formed on top of the polymer structures by means of evaporation under an inclined angle. These separated nanowires exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (SPR) in the VIS to NIR spectral region, overlapping with the so-called biological window. This together with the alignment of human cells on such LIPSS structures renders our nanowires as very promising candidates for biosensing applications.

U.U IV.2
13:35
Authors : Professor Dr. Ovidiu Crisan (ocrisan@yahoo.com)
Affiliations : 1 National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania 2 Condensed Matter Physics CMP, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH, Leicester, UK

Resume : Nanoscale organized materials for different purposes, such as nano-electronics, biomedicine, or magnetic applications are extensively studied. Novel nanoscale architectures are now engineered by using molecule-by-molecule or atom-by-atom assemblies, into building blocks for nanoscale devices, with a variety of properties, within the so-called “bottom-up” approach. A novel method for production of free clusters as building blocks for nanoscale devices is presented. These clusters may be subsequently functionalized in-situ by adding atoms/molecules of different nature, on the surface of readily formed clusters. The method uses a cold beam of rare gas (Ar) molecules and clusters, passing through a region of low-pressure atomic vapour, in an ultra-high-vacuum multiple chamber facility. The atoms are collected and condensed by the rare gas beam in the pick-up zone, and a large variety of very small cold clusters, metals, oxides, molecules, etc. are thus formed. We prove that the cluster size is extremely well controlled by the vapour pressure of the picked-up species. The method is versatile, since it allows multiple pick-up processes within the same rare gas cluster for producing, for example metal/oxide core-shell nanoparticles that are furthermore functionalized by attaching to the surface of the cluster, various molecules such as pentacene, for applications in nanoelectronics and aptamers, nucleotides, antibodies, for applications in biomedicine. Initial formation of Fe gas-stabilised clusters, Fe/Fe oxide core-shell nanoparticles, their structure and morphology, are presented and discussed.

U.U IV.3
14:55
Authors : Cezarina Cela Mardare (cezarina.mardare@jku.at), Achim Walter Hassel
Affiliations : Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at the Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz, Austria

Resume : Transition metal oxides like WO3 and MoO3 are versatile materials investigated nowadays for their properties like gas sensing and electrochromism. There are indications that both MoO3 and WO3 also possess antimicrobial properties, which can be used against proliferation of nosocomial infections in hospitals [1]. In this work two new approaches are presented: the preparation and characterization of Mo-W oxides combinatorial thin film libraries and the proof of principle as they can be used as antimicrobial coatings with screening compositional ranges active against E. Coli. Combinatorial thin film coatings with compositional spreads ranging from 91 to 44 at.% Mo (9 to 56 at.% W, respectively) were successfully deposited by thermal co-evaporation. After a multiple step heat treatment, a mixture of crystalline molybdenum and tungsten oxides and sub-oxides, and amorphous tungsten oxide were obtained. Preliminary tests of the coatings antimicrobial activity against E. Coli strain BL21DE3 (kanamycin resistant) were performed, by investigating the bacterial growth both onto the surface and in the volume of the working culture. In some certain compositional ranges the antimicrobial activity was proven, and some possible mechanisms were proposed. The mechanism involves a combined contribution of surface structuring and the presence of W19O49 phase [2]. [1] C. Zollfrank et al., Mater Sci Eng C 32, 47 (2012) [2] C. C. Mardare and A. W. Hassel, ACS Comb Sci – under review

U.U IV.6
15:15
Authors : Dr. Beata Kalska-Szostko, Urszula Wykowska, Dariusz Satuła
Affiliations : Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok, Poland; Faculty of Physcis, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok, Poland; kalska@uwb.edu.pl

Resume : Recently bioinspiered nanocomposites become driving force for many interesting investigations. Among others, integration of the magnetic nanoparticles with biomolecules leads to a novel hybrid system which connect characteristic of nano- and bioparticle in one. Such way can be combined recognition or catalytic properties of biomaterials with the attractive electronic, optical, magnetic and structural characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles. To obtain biocomposite, nanoparticles should be functionalized with adequate biomolecules through different linkage chemistries. It can be directly bonded with organic molecules which form at the surface self – assembled monolayers. These can be further modified either: by formation of covalent bonds with connectors like glutaraldehyde or by direct noncovalent interactions with fatty acids, proteins. Noncovalent bonds are one of the most important bonds in biological systems especially in hydrogen bonding networks. Different ligands with different affinity to the modified surfaces and bioparticles can be obtained: -SH, -COOH, -OP, -CN. The reason why magnetic nanoparticles are considered as a good candidate of biocomposite constituents is their magnetic properties, which gives fast and easy manipulation tool with use of external magnetic field. Structural and magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles and composites will be tested by: XRD, TEM, IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

U.U IV.7
16:45
Authors : F. J. Teran (1), P. Perna (1), G. Salas (1), D. Cabrera (1), S. M. Ocampo,1 M. P. Morales,2 A. Ayuso-Sacido,1,3 A. L.Cortajarena,1 A.Somoza,1 A. Villanueva,1,4 J. Camarero 1,4 and R. Miranda 1,4
Affiliations : (1) IMDEA Nanoscience, 28049 Madrid, Spain (2) ICMM-CSIC, 280449 Madrid, Spain (3) Hospital de Madrid Foundation, Madrid, Spain (4) Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & Instituto “Nicolás Cabrera”, 28049 Madrid, Spain; paolo.perna@imdea.org

Resume : One of the main challenges in nanomedicine is to provide early diagnosis, minimally-invasive and efficient treatments against cancer.In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles(IONP) are a real breakthrough in biomedical research.We review the current research on IONP to achieve “therasnostic” tools, with customized biological, chemical and physical functionalities for selective targeting detection and elimination of cancer cells1.A review of the fundamentals and experimental data will be shown, paying special attention to the influence of biological matrix on the nanomagnetism of IONP. This is crucial to warrant the heat mediated by IONP and its contrast agent signal for acting as efficient theranostic agents. Different results will be shown related to the IONP chemical synthesis, characterization of IONP dynamic magnetic and thermal properties2 for generating efficient intracellular hyperthermia3, their bio-functionalization with anticancer agents, and biological studies related to the IONP internalization and anticancer activity4.New guidelines to optimize the heating efficiency of IONP via tailoring heating mechanisms will be shown5,opening the way towards improving the use of IONP in biomedical applications. [1]F.J.Teran,et al “Cancer treatment using magnetic nanoparticles”.Yearbook of Science & Technology 2013, McGrawHill. [2] J. Mater. Chem. 22,21065 (2012); [3] Appl.Phys.Lett.101,062413 (2012); [4]Nanomedicine 10,733 (2013), [5] Salas et al. submitted to J. Phys.Chem.C

U.U IV.10
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09:00
Authors : Chiung Wen Kuo and Peilin Chen
Affiliations : Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Resume : An optically transparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) based organic electronic devices have been developed to investigate the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) and to sense and to capture circulating tumor cells. We first conducted a control experiment on electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) device by culturing the hMSC on the chip. According to our result, the impedance increased reflected the hMSC proliferation, attachment and motility during the first 16 hours of cell culture. In order to control the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) on chip, we also developed all-solution-processed multifunctional organic devices, comprising reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and dexamethasone 21-phosphate disodium salt (DEX) drug loaded poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) microelectrode arrays on indium tin oxide glass, that can be used to manipulate differentiation. In our devices, the rGO micropatterns were used as the adhesive coating to attract the adhesion of hMSC cells whereas PLL-g-PEG coated PEDOT electrodes served as the anti-adhesive coating where no hMSC cells can attach. In addition, the PEDOT electrodes also work as drug releasing components where control DEX release from PEDOT matrix can be achieved via cyclic potential stimulation (CPS). To capture the circulating tumor cells, we fabricated 3D PEDOT-based micro/nanorod array, which can be further surface-grafted with capture agents for directed specific recognition to study the cell–substrate interactions on bioelectronics interfaces (BEIs). This BEI platform features the advantageous characteristics: (1) diverse dimensional structures (tunable from the microscale to the nanoscale), (2) varied surface chemical properties (tunable from nonspecific to specific), (3) high electrical conductivity, and (4) reversible chemical redox switching. Furthermore, through systematic studies of PEDOT systems, we explore the effects of both chemistry and topography on the circulating tumor cell (CTC)-capture performance. The 400 nm PEDOT pillars exhibited the optimal cell-capture efficiency; it could be used to isolate CTCs with minimal contamination from surrounding nontargeted cells (e.g., EpCAM-negative cells, white blood cells) and negligible disruption of the CTCs’ viability and functions. It is conceivable that PEDOT-based micro/nanorod array films function as a critical therapeutic intervention for monitoring tumor progression and metathesis, providing valuable insight into the use of electronics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

U.U V.1
09:40
Authors : M. Venanzi,1,2 E. Gatto,1 F. Formaggio,3 C. Toniolo3
Affiliations : 1Dept. of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, and 2Centre for Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Advanced Instrumentation, University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’, Rome, Italy; 3ICB, Padova Unit, CNR, Dept. of Chemistry, University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

Resume : Recently we showed that self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by conformationally constrained peptides functionalized with antenna chromophores and covalently linked to gold electrodes, were able to generate electronic current after photoexcitation with good efficiency. We deminstrated that the modification of a gold substrate by deposition of a peptide layer allowed for fine tuning of the electronic conduction properties of the substrate. Particularly important is the effect that the electrostatic field generated by the helix macrodipole exerts on the efficiency of electron transfer (ET) across the peptide chain and on the electrode work potential at the peptide/gold junction. In particular, we showed that it is possible to switch from positive (anodic) to negative (cathodic) electronic currents by varying the applied potential to the SAM-coated electrode or by exploiting interchain ET pathways in bicomponent peptide SAMs. This knowledge allowed us to use a suitably functionalized peptide SAM as the photoactive element of a prototype Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell, enhancing the efficiency of a standard electrochemical cell based on TiO2 nanoparticles.

U.U V.2
10:10
Authors : Dr. E. D. Głowacki, M.Irimia-Vladu, N. S. Sariciftci
Affiliations : 1 Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Physical Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria; 2 Joanneum Research GmbH, Weiz, Austria

Resume : Many natural chromophores have recently emerged as suitable semiconducting materials for (opto)electronic applications. The motivation for exploring such molecules is the realization of biodegradable and biocompatible electronics fabricated from cheap and nontoxic materials. We find that natural pigment-forming dye molecules, such as those from the indigo family, form highly-ordered thin films with excellent -stacking. Using such films, we have demonstrated field-effect transistors (FETs) and complementary-like circuit elements utilizing exclusively natural materials operating at the state-of-the-art level with respect to mobility and operational stability in ambient conditions. These dyes show air-stable ambipolar charge transport with balanced hole and electron mobilities in the range of 1×10-2 – 2 cm2/Vs. A very important property is that these molecules form high crystal lattice energy solids with exceptional operational, thermal, and chemical stability. FETs with indigos can be operated without any passivation in highly-demanding aqueous environments, within a pH range from 3-11 and with a variety of different ions. We report on the results of stressing tests in such underwater environments. The –NH and =O functional groups lend themselves to easy functionalizing, which we have exploited to two ends: 1) creation of stable colloidal nanocrystals with controllable morphology and optical properties, and 2) biofunctionalization. We discuss also preliminary experiments concerning field-effect transistor biodetectors based on these materials. Hydrogen-bonded natural and nature-inspired materials are an interesting and previously unexplored class of organic semiconductors with inherent potential for biointegrated applications.

U.U V.3
11:00
Authors : Professor Bo ZHU
Affiliations : State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials & College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai, 201600, China

Resume : Electrically conducting polymers (ECPs) were widely used to electrically couple with cells in implanted electronic devices and biosensors, mainly thanks to the long-term stability of their electrical properties in biological environments and their mechanical properties comparable with that of the extracellular matrix. To erase/diminish nonspecific interaction for ECPs would not only increase the selectivity of biosensors but also reduce the inflammation risk for implants. In this presentation, we show that with finely tuning the chemical structure, ECPs could specifically interact with cells on a protein-resistance background. Our recent works further demonstrated that with combining specific interaction with protein resistance on ECPs, they could differentiate cells, dynamically interact with and release cells, or even help to construct a three-dimensional platform to capture CTC cells with both high efficiency and selectivity.

U.U V.4
11:30
Authors : K. Kertész1, G. Piszter1, E. Gergely-Fülöp1, Zs. Baji1, Zs. Bálint2, Z. Vértesy1, L. P. Biró1
Affiliations : 1 Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49, Hungary (http://www.nanotechnology.hu/) 2 Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross utca 13, H-1088 Budapest, Hungary

Resume : The physical color in biological materials in certain cases is determined by the structural and optical properties of the constitutive photonic crystal. The most investigated examples are among arthropods where the colorful structures are located in scales [1]. Altering the refractive index of the materials will produce a measurable color change. As an application, butterfly wings in volatile vapors show concentration dependent optical reflectivity variation [2]. The refractive index change also depends on temperature and is enhanced by capillary condensation [3]. Here we will compare the behavior of butterfly wings as gas sensors with bioinspired samples. On biological detectors we have shown that different butterfly wings exhibit specific response to the same vapors [4]. Chemical selectivity has been shown for different vapors on the same nanostructure [2]. Now we intend to investigate nanoarchitectures with similar structural properties made of chitinous material and we will compare them to inorganic Si based nanocomposites. Recently we pointed out the effect of minor structural differences on the reflectance spectra of Blue butterfly wings [5], the same delicate dependence is expected in case of bioinspired structures. [1] LP Biró & JP Vigneron, Laser & Photonics Rev. 5, 27, 2011 [2] RA Potyrailo et al. Nat. Phot. 1, 123, 2007 [3] K Kertesz et al. Appl. Surf. Sci. 281, 49, 2013 [4] LP Biró et al. Proc SPIE 7057, 705706-1, 2008 [5] Zs Bálint et al. Interface 9, 1745-1756

U.U V.5
 
SESSION VI. Bio -sensing, -detection, -recognition, -regulation molecular systems in bioprocesses guidance, optimization by nanomaterials, integrated in devices, systems : In collaboration with Invited Organizer – Chair: Professor Bo Zhu, Donghua University, China. In collaboration: Prof. Dr. Arzum Erdem, Ege University, Turkey, PhD Paolo Perna, IMDEA, Nanoscience, Spain, and Prof. H.I.Vorobets, Dep. of Computer Systems and Networks, Y. Fedkowych Chernivtsi National University, Ukraine
13:30
Authors : PhD Paolo Perna, Francisco J. Terán, Julio Camarero, and Rodolfo Miranda
Affiliations : IMDEA NANOSCIENCE, c/ Faraday 9, Campus de Cantoblanco ES-28049, Madrid, Spain; paolo.perna@imdea.org

Resume : Magnetoelectronics at the nanoscale provides new strategies to tackle issues concerning to life sciences and healthcare: from recognition of molecules to therapeutic health treatments. The basic requirement needed by this novel research field, is the strict synergy of a wide spectrum of scientific competences: physicists, chemists, biologists, physicians and engineers are called to join their expertise in order to realize innovative tools and new-concept devices. Magnetic structures can be exploited to detect molecules, bacteria and cells or to improve the functionalities of artificial biological tissues and finally may be directly employed to drug delivery and to kill cancers. However, this is only possible through a smart bio-functionalization of the magnetic objects, and a control onto their magnetic properties. I illustrate different examples of bio-sensing and bio-medical applications based on magnetic nanomaterials.

U.U V..9
14:15
Authors : Professor Yaopeng Zhang, Qingfa Peng, Huili Shao, Xuechao Hu
Affiliations : Donghua University; zyp@dhu.edu.cn

Resume : Natural animal silks from spider and silkworm have many remarkable properties. The dimension and functions of spinning apparatus in vivo were biomimicked in microfluidic devices with microchannels. Raman spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique were adopted to analyze the conformation transition of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) and the shape parameters of RSF aggregates in aqueous solutions before and after flowing in the microchannel. Results showed that higher RSF concentration, lower pH value and higher concentration of calcium ion in the solution promoted the growth of RSF aggregates and the conformation transition of RSF from α-helix to β-sheet. The increasing shear time and elongation rate had similar effects on the structure transition of RSF in aqueous solution. We also integrated multiple functions of the natural spinning apparatus in the microfluidic device. These functions include protein composition adjustment, shearing and elongation of spinning dope and spinning. The integration may have significant influence on the application of microfluidic technology in bio-inspired spinning.

U.U VI.3
15:00
Authors : Professor Shutao Wang
Affiliations : Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences; stwang@mail.ipc.ac.cn

Resume : Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an emerging “biomarker” for monitoring cancer metastasis and prognosis. Although there are existing technologies available for isolating/counting CTCs, the most common of which using immunomagnetic beads, they are limited by their low capture efficiencies and low specificities. By introducing a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured substrate – specifically, a silicon-nanowire (SiNW) array coated with anti-EpCAM – we can capture CTCs with much higher efficiency and specificity. The conventional methods of isolating CTCs depend on biomolecular recognitions, such as antigen-antibody interaction. Unlikely, we here proposed that nanoscaled local topographic interactions besides biomolecular recognitions inspired by natural immuno-recognizing system. This cooperative effect of physical and chemical issues between CTCs and substrate leads to increased binding of CTCs, which significantly enhance capture efficiency. Recently, we have also developed a 3D cell capture/release system triggered by aptamer enzyme, electrical potential and Temperature, which is effective and of “free damage" to capture and release cancer cells. The bio-inspired interfaces of cell capture and release open up a light to rare-cell based diagnostics, such as CTCs, fetal cells, stem cell and so on.

U.U VI.5
16:30
Authors : Professor Arzum Erdem
Affiliations : Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Analytical Chemistry Department, 35100 Bornova, Izmir, TURKEY arzum.erdem@ege.edu.tr

Resume : Aptamers are nucleic acid sequences that could selectively bind to their target molecules similiar to antibodies [1,2]. The synthesis and selection of aptamers are done by using SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment) method. The improved stability properties including resistant to denaturation and degradation, easy modification, target adaptability and easy-to-stock make them more advantageous comparison to antibodies and ideal candidates as protein recognition elements in a wide range of bioassays and for diagnostic applications. The development of advanced biosensor platforms could impact significantly the areas of genomics, proteomics, biomedical diagnostics and drug discovery [3-5]. Electrochemical biosensors coupling the inherent specifity of biorecognition reactions with the high sensitivity of physical transducers, hold great promise for detection of sequence-specific nucleic acids, or proteins for clinical, environmental or forensic investigations [2-5]. An overview to electrochemical monitoring of aptamer-protein interactions in combination with disposable sensor platforms has been presented herein with their advantages and further applications. Acknowledgements. A.E acknowledges the financial support from Turkish Scientific and Technological Council (TUBITAK) (Project no.111T073), and she also would like to express her gratitude to the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) as the associate member of TUBA for its partial support. References 1- J. Muller, B. Isermann, C. Ducker, M. Salehi, M. Meyer, M. Friedrich, T. Madhusudhan, J. Oldenburg, G. Mayer, B. Potzsch, Chem. Biol. 16 (2009) 442. 2- M. Mascini, I. Palchetti, S. Tombelli, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51 (2012) 1316. 3- E. Palecek, M. Bartosík, Chem. Rev. 112 (2012) 3427. 4- J. Wang, Electroanalysis 17 (2005) 7. 5- A. Erdem, Talanta, 74 (2007) 318.

U.U VI.7
17:15
Authors : Professor Vorobets H.I.
Affiliations : Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University; g.vorobets@chnu.edu.ua

Resume : Prospects for practical application of semiconductor sensors based on nanostructured and biointegrated materials primarily related to the development of so-called advanced cyber-physical systems. These systems are based on the use of intelligent embedded computer devices and are designed to analyze large volumes of incoming information signals in real-time a set and synthesis of recommendations to support decision-making, or forming the output array control signals to ensure the stability of the system under uncertainty. The variety of the analyzed signal generated by biomedical, biotech, telemetry and other systems led to the need to formulate a new direction - multifunctional embedded selfreconfigurable systems able to adapt to the solvable problem-oriented tasks. Clearly, reliability and portability of such systems is determined by the correctness and reliability of the signal processing of semiconductor, including optical, electrical, biointegrated and others sensors, which are the basis of information-measuring systems tract of the cyber-physical systems. In this research the technique and conducted testing of the synthesis of multifunctional selfreconfigurable embedded computer systems based on the through systematic analysis of a set of problem-oriented tasks for which the synthesized system. The basis of this analysis is the choice of the set of measured parameters characteristic of physical objects or processes with appropriate descriptions of arrays, such as temperature, current, voltage, light power and more: M = {[T, U, I, F, ...] [vT, VD, ...]}. Approved structural and algorithmic solutions for the implementation of selfreconfigurable directly depend on the boundary, say, the control parameter values of the object or process error computations that are crucial in selecting methods and algorithms for synthesizing information and identifies the parameters used sensors - current, photo- concentration sensitivity, temperature range, and others. As a simulation model for the implementation of the proposed principles of synthesis of selfreconfigurable embedded multifunctional computer system tested information-measuring system implemented on top of the pH sensor and gas sensor CO, SxOy, NxOy.

U.U VI.9

No abstract for this day

No abstract for this day


Symposium organizers
Emmanuel STRATAKISInstitute of Electrnic Structure and Laser (IESL)

Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) and University of Crete, Nikolau Plastira 1000, Voutes, Heraklion, Crete

+30 2810 3912 74
stratak@iesl.forth.gr
Eugenia BUZANEVATaras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv

NASU “Physical and Chemical Material Science Centre”, Volodymyrs'ka Str. 64/13, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine

+38 044 294 26 22
emrs@univ.kiev.ua
Peter SCHARFFTechnical University of llmenau

Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Weimarer Strasse 25, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany

+49 36 77 69 3603(04)
peter.scharff@tu-ilmenau.de